Shannon Kelly

Shannon Kelly

I am a film undergraduate student with a passion for the creative arts. Located in Sydney, Australia.

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Latest Topics

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How growing up with Sci-Fi is different from discovering it as an adult.

Sci-Fi television has seen its fanbase grow immensely over the past decade. Many shows such as Doctor Who and Supernatural have an intense cult following on the Internet, which has only existed since the advent of Tumblr. Now, these same fans are flocking to old shows like Firefly and fueling their obsessions through binge-watching. How have the same Sci-Fi shows had different effects on viewers depending on whether they grew up watching them weekly or discovered them for the first time as an adult (or teenager)? And how has the Internet and social media influenced a new generation of Sci-Fi lovers?

  • As a young viewer, the entrenched messages and the profoundness of the story line I believe tends to hold a subdued stance. An adult may find more practical value in the artistry, the potential, and the timelessness of the substance behind the entire production. An interesting point, hope to read it soon. – lofreire 3 years ago
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  • I find this topic interesting and worthy of investigation, but I'm unclear on how exactly one can go about evaluating the central question. The way I see it, there are really only two options: anecdotal evidence (which makes for a weak argument) or conducting extensive research interviews (which is, quite frankly, too much work for a typical Artifice-level article). If there is a third route, I'd be happy to be proven wrong; I just think it would just be a shame to see this good topic wasted in the event that the prospective author should choose the former. – ProtoCanon 3 years ago
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  • Interesting topic. I think there's definitely scope to look at if and why the timing of when you are exposed to something might have a more pronounced effect in the science fiction genre than in other genres. I suppose it might be something to do with the degree of foreign-ness of the subject matter. For example, I might have a different/more difficult time trying to get a friend to watch old star trek episodes with me, than i would trying to get the same friend to watch Gilmore Girls with me. If I grew up with both and loved both, but she did not grow up with either, I wonder if and why one may be more accessible than the other for my friend as an adult. I would be curious to see what kind of research there is out there on this in terms of genres and the effect of growing up with shows from particular genres such as science fiction, as opposed to finding them later in life. It's an interesting topic, I look forward to seeing what happens with it! – HRadford 3 years ago
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Latest Comments

Shannon Kelly

Mikey, what a well-written argument supporting such a beautiful piece of art. I have always had a superficial love for Danny Elfman’s music in this film, but I never took the time to internalise and analyse it. Thank you for taking this time to write this. It has really opened my eyes to something I knew was there but never really understood.

The Nightmare Before Christmas: Why Being Unique in Hollywood Still Matters
Shannon Kelly

Adnan, thank you!! This article is everything I’ve ever wanted to say about my love for Star Wars and I am definitely using this to back myself up next time someone tries to challenge me. As a current young adult who grew up watching the prequels as they were released in cinemas, my passion for the original trilogy is just as strong as my love for every bit of the prequels (yes, even Jar Jar). Fans need to realise that the world-building and overall franchise George Lucas has created is brilliant, but coming from a critical standpoint, the original trilogy and prequels alike are not the best filmwise. However, this certainly does not diminish my adoration for them, nor should it anyone else’s.

In Defense of the Star Wars Prequels
Shannon Kelly

Daniel, this is a great topic of discussion and I completely agree with your argument. Even in big budget movies like Star Wars Ep. VII and Guardians of the Galaxy, it is obvious when practical effects are not being used cohesively with CGI. Of course, there are many filmmakers who have found a balance, but most of Hollywood right now needs to learn that in order to make visual effects fit seamlessly into a film, practical effects are needed just as much as (if not more than) CGI.

Does CGI Benefit Special Effects or Detract From Them?