shiroyuni

shiroyuni

Shiroyuni is foremost an anime blogger on the interwebs at http://www.thelimitlessimagination.wordpress.comEverything else comes after that :>

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    Musings on Fate Stay Night Unlimited Blade Works (TV series): Emiya Shirou's Idealism

    A huge fan favourite, the Fate Stay Night series of visual novels originally penned by Kinoko Nasu, who also founded Type Moon, coupled with Fate/Zero written by Gen Urobuchi, slowly gained traction in the anime community with the first famed adaptation of Fate Stay Night (TV Series). Spawning many movies, TV series in the form of Fate Zero and the Unlimited Blade Works route, this is surely not just another generic tale of dark fantasy steeped in life-changing consequences.

    Part of the Fate series’ attraction lies in the how different character motivations can be despite harbouring arguable ‘good’ intentions. One prime example comes in the form of Emiya Shirou, the protagonist in Fate Stay Night and Unlimited Blade Works whose ideals detract largely from his adopted father, Kiritsugu. Both intended to benefit the world and, to save as many people as possible, yet the way they set about carrying out this mission which is of utter importance to them reveals a fundamental difference in their moral beliefs and value judgments.

    This is especially seen in Unlimited Blade Works, where the dialogue-heavy exposition and verbal sparring between Shirou and characters like Archer, Rin Tohsaka and Gilgamesh exposes the weaknesses in Shirou’s beliefs and how impractical and fruitless his blind pursuit in those ideals are. Yet, Shirou’s beliefs – by argument of how the series ends – seem to be promoted as the main takeaway and portrayed in a positive light.

    Are the arguments put forth by Archer and Gilgamesh not valid? Are Rin’s concerns for Shirou’s well-being unfounded? Can Shirou’s values stand on their own? This article attempts an exposition of the various arguments propounded by the above-mentioned characters based on the material covered in Unlimited Blade Works, and seeks to examine whether Shirou’s principles are really as admirable as they seem to be.

    • The Fate/stay night visual novels were written by Nasu, not Urobuchi. Urobuchi only penned Fate/Zero. – ZeroReq011 5 years ago
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    • @ZeroReq011 Ah yes, I missed that out & edited the above. Thanks for pointing it out! – shiroyuni 5 years ago
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    • Very Interesting! – scattaharris 5 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    shiroyuni

    I personally think to write a topic on manga would be attempting to cover too much ground at a go, though I still commend this article for articulating some very salient points. Also, I was of the impression that majority of manga readership belongs to males, though correct me with I am wrong.

    Manga: The Hidden Treasure in America
    shiroyuni

    Sadly, I think personal subjectivity may be an impediment towards seeing whether a medium of entertainment is mature or immature or just plain weird. Its rare to see people able to throw away personal biases to see what is really hidden beneath – most are still able to raise examples about the copious amount of hentai and pure fanservice-dedicated harem romcoms just to prove their point that anime is immature or unhealthy. It probably goes back to societal perceptions of anime and the demographic of otakus who enjoy it, at some point.

    Perceptions of Maturity in Anime
    shiroyuni

    Great post! Akane serves as a moral compass of all the main characters as the lines of morality she draws between following and defying the system may accord more with our sense of morals, not being in the society that Psycho Pass is situated in.
    Makishima is probably the most interesting character for me given that his goal is one that is not common compared to stereotypical anime villains.

    Psycho-Pass: The Ethics of an "Ideal" Society