therevolution

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Dragon Ball; why is it still endearing to people everywhere?

    The original run of the manga and anime, Dragon Ball, the most popular work by mangaka Akira Toriyama, has long since finished (although a new series of films and episodes is just being released in Japan). And yet, it is arguably the most popular Shonen series even to this day. What is it about the series that is so compelling? Are the characters and their arcs sympathetic, or is it the simplicity of the story-telling and morals?

    • As a life long fan of Dragon Ball myself, I'd say its a combination of both. Dragon Ball started out about the adventure and growth of Goku's character as he trains to be the strongest fighter along with his childlike innocence and kindness that makes him compelling to follow on his adventures. Where as Dragon Ball Z stepped up the game with bigger threats that pushed Goku's limits even further with life threatening villains and introduced plot concepts that could have been never conceived in the original story. But aside that, it was also the shonen series that introduced character and manga/anime tropes that would later be used in other manga and anime, such as iconic special attacks that is recognizable with a specific character. And was also the major inspiration for other manga series, mostly known with Naruto and One Piece. – Ryan Walsh 5 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    I like that the writer had the grit to take a well-loved mythic character from the series and make him the antagonist.

    The Four Timelines of The Terminator Movies

    This game is one of the pinnacles of artistic achievement using its medium. Subtle choices in how you play the game affect its story, not obvious prompts like the much-lauded Telltale series (though I do also enjoy this style of game). It has brilliant aesthetic design, for its city and monsters, a claustrophobic soundtrack and a sense of surrealism in its characters. Another underrated Silent Hill is the Wii title Shattered Memories, one of the only good western-made SH games. The game changed with how you responded in a psycho-analytical therapist’s frame narrative. The writer went on to do ‘Her Story’, a recent game on PC. Check it out.

    Silent Hill 2: A Pinnacle in Gaming Symbolism

    I would love to see an adaptation of several Image properties. I’m glad Saga was up there; I’d also like to see East of West, and Wytches. Oh, and of course, The Wicked + The Divine.

    Comics That Deserve Their Own Show/Film

    I feel like I am one of the only people who really appreciated Genisys. It is by no means the best Terminator film, but I still think it is a worthier sequel to the original two than, say, 3 or Salvation. 3 was trying too hard to rehash moments in Judgment Day, and Salvation, well, ‘I can feel your heart beat, it’s so strong!’. Cringe.

    Genisys took the Terminator series back to its roots, thematically and literally. With many smart, subtle nods to the original (and, well, others admittedly less subtle) the film also puts an engaging twist on one of the mythic characters of the franchise in its incarnation of John Connor.

    The Four Timelines of The Terminator Movies