DLC

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Downloadable Content - Difference Between a Cash Grab and Actual Content

So many games lately have been focusing on releasing hoards of extra content after the base game’s release. Sometimes, there is the season pass system, which doesn’t even offer you access to all of the content that will be released (look at Borderlands and Fall Out for two quick examples), or sometimes, the content just really isn’t that impressive and makes you wonder why it wasn’t included in the base game (look at the new Lego Games and Batman).

But then there’s games like the new The Witcher – where the add-on content adds almost a whole new game onto what has already been released.

Why is there such a huge range in terms of what game development companies are doing? Are some truly just attempts to get more cash out of consumers for their products? Is content like The Witcher’s expansions a sign of more dedicated developers? Why are so many games seeming to cost more and more, with less value being added?

  • Definitely a topic worth writing about. As you stated, there's such a wide margin for what qualifies as DLC and what qualifies as a completed game. I think the mentality for developers has become "Well, if we don't finish this before release, we'll just make fans buy a Season Pass for content that should've been in the main game!"Speaking personally, I think the quality of games has gone downhill a lot in the recent decade. You used to be able to count on that you were getting what you paid for, and I understand development is a time consuming process but...at least give me a game that's not in pieces at the end of it all. – Nayr1230 4 years ago
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  • I'd like a layer of real-world research in this piece, exploring rate of production/speed of release and number of costly DLC's. To better explain: are companies forcing games into the public's hands before they're fully complete, knowing that the skeleton structure of a game will demand a DLC? Or are they flushing out fully realized games, taking their time in creation, writing and production, and then providing additional outlets for further exploration. – Piper CJ 4 years ago
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  • Check out the game Evolve, and how it's undergone a complete resdesign in its philosophy concerning DLC. Also, talk about "On-Disc DLC," where content is already in the game, just gated behind a paywall to unlock it at a later date (like the latest Street Fighter installment). – Tarben 4 years ago
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  • Don't get me started on Starwars Battlefront and how it changed the way we play video games; for the worst that is – Riccio 4 years ago
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  • Riccio, I think you just came up with a great topic. – Tigey 4 years ago
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The Ethics Behind Downloadable Content in Videogames. When Should We Draw the Line on Excessive Pricing?

With recent game releases such as "Starwars Battlefront," a lot of gamers are frustrated with the lack of content on the base, $60 game, with most content locked away behind an additional $50 price tag. While some DLC can add a lot to a game, such as extra story missions in the "Borderlands" series or new playable characters in "Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and 3DS," other DLC feels like the developers are just showing their inner greed (ex. downloadable content that is almost crucial to understanding the game’s full story.) Explore the ethical issues when developers, almost intentionally, leave games unfinished and devoid of content. When does DLC become less of a "reward" for players looking for more content and more of a quick, money-making business scheme?

  • (Make sure to capitalize the words in the title). I think this is a really interesting and relevant topic. It could also be interesting to talk about what the cause of the trend toward including DLC is, and why its becoming so omnipresent. – Null 5 years ago
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  • I don't view this as an ethical issue, as both parties are using their free exercise to create video game content, and to purchase that content (or not in either case). I see this more as a question of motives for creating content. – JDJankowski 4 years ago
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