DKWeber

DKWeber

DK is a Teaching Associate of English at Coastal Carolina University. He believes literature is like a mother cradling a crying infant, it rocks!!!

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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

5

Streaming Good Writers: The Evolution of Television Writing

The 1970s saw a big push in public consumption of television. With well written programs like The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, and Good Times, society scheduled their evenings around television programming. This trend continued into the 00s until the rise of reality tv and the advent of DVR and streaming networks like Netflix. The public began moving away from tv for a more niche market suited for individual experience. Analyze the rise of binge-watching and how this reality changed the ways writers approach script.

  • Maybe looking at two or three shows on Netflix specifically might help maintain focus on the phenomenon of binge watching. And perhaps parallel that with solid shows like MASH, and how no show will likely ever receive that level of viewership, since nowadays, people consume TV in a very niche, individualistic approach. – mazzamura 3 months ago
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  • The relationship between binge-watch culture and television writers is an interesting topic to explore. Perhaps, as a way to focus the thesis of this piece, draw examples from shows that, without new digital outlets like Netflix and Amazon, would have died a quiet, unfortunate death (shows like STRANGER THINGS and SNEAKY PETE, for example), never to see the light of day.Another question this premise poses: Are writers really changing their approach to show creation in this post-Netflix world? And furthermore, are there new trends found in digital-exclusive shows that makes it more inherently bingeable (in season/episode structure, characters, etc)? – bloom 3 months ago
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  • These are great notes. I definitely think show creation has seen an evolution. Mini movies over compact 30 min to an hour plot lines. Thanks for the assistance. This would be a dope article. Of course, I'm biased. – DKWeber 3 months ago
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  • Another thing to discuss is the length of shows per season and how that might affect the writing of shows overall. It might also have an impact on binge watching if one show has a season that is 8 to 13 episodes long compared to say 20 or more. – CoolishMarrow90 3 months ago
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The Hard Truth: Analyzing George Carlin's take of Soft Language

Analyze the way George Carlin, in his comedy routine titled "Soft Language", discusses the evolution of language through jargon and euphemisms in daily society and interpret the effects of this evolution over time, beginning with the groundwork laid by Carlin in his 1990 Comedy Special Doin’ It Again and ending with modern day jargon and euphemisms.

  • This would be interesting to explore in light of current political divisions— how the same idea can be split and reinterpreted in different groups, and called entirely different things. – eleanorstern 3 months ago
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Latest Comments

DKWeber

As are many Romantics lol. It’s not for everyone. You may enjoy Modernist poems from the likes of Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, and Gertrude Stein.

Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture
DKWeber

That’s great to hear. Keep expanding that world view. Also, check out Jack Gilbert if you’re a fan of emotion filled poetry.

Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture
DKWeber

I can see that as well. That’s the beauty of poetry, right? There’s no one way to discuss or try to explain it.

Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture
DKWeber

Wordsworth seems to be the primary focus of most Romanticism classes. It’s sad sometimes because we forget about other greats like Coleridge, William Blake, and John Keats.

Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture
DKWeber

Thank you.

Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture
DKWeber

How exciting! You’ve just made me more happy than you can imagine. Knowing I had even a small part in generating another’s interest in experiencing poetry means a lot. I’d love to know what you were drawn toward.

Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture
DKWeber

That’s great! My dad’s not a big fan of poetry. It’s not a part of my life he entertains often. I’m glad you two could share in Coleridge’s work.

Coleridge, The Hippie: Romanticism and The Counter Culture
DKWeber

Beautifully explained. It’s amazing how a literary device such as dramatic irony can lift the inclusion of the reader in a story. When a reader feels as if they are part of the story as opposed to a simple viewer, the stakes change a bit in regards to character(s). While I may have a bias being a fan of Poe and enjoy reading what others have to say in regards to his work, I believe this analysis is extremely clear and insightful. The explanation of terror vs. horror is a refreshing angle for a repetitive theme found in Poe. Thank you for your contribution.

Terror and Horror in Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado"