Michel Sabbagh

Michel Sabbagh

Editorial Assistant of Qu Literary Magazine + Writer for Cathnoquey: The Fractured Isles. Past QA Tester at Bethesda Softworks + Gamasutra & Southern Review of Books Bylin

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Latest Topics

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Moby-Dick And Humankind's Fear Of And Desire To Conquer The Unknown

Between Melville’s description of the color white as one of unsettling nothingness and the meticulous description of whales/whaling that can border on the obsessive (which could mirror Ahab’s mindset), Moby Dick sports a kind of thematic link that emphasizes humankind’s grappling with that which they either can’t/won’t understand or are willing to study if it means being better able to control the unknown. Have any of you gotten the impression that Ahab—in his single-mindedness—stands as a metaphor of sorts for the individual who not only dreads the strange, but also seeks to annihilate/tame it?

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    Latest Comments

    Michel Sabbagh

    The likes of Bradbury, Shelley, and Le Guin proved that the depth and analytical appeal of literary fiction can apply to genre fiction premises and concepts. Having an interest in and extensive knowledge of the human condition can benefit characterization and thematic potency, something that can be turned into a vibrant metaphor via genre fiction templates like SFF and horror.

    Genre Fiction in University Writing Programs: No longer the MFA's Red-headed Stepchild
    Michel Sabbagh

    Writing consists of not just wrangling words, but also having one’s work shared with others so they may offer feedback for further improvement. So although talent is a boon for the budding talent, persistence and a willingness to accept critiques and change are just as, if not more, crucial.

    As for teaching, a combination of traditional instructing and self-teaching can work. On one hand, having a second pair of eyes gauge your work can help one identify blind spots in their judgment of their writing. On the other hand, genuine (and good) writing stems a lot from one’s personal initiative.

    Are Creative Writers Taught or Talented?
    Michel Sabbagh

    The same way that working out daily is a good way of remaining fit in the long term, writing and reading every day can be useful for becoming more comfortable and proficient in the trade. As long as one relishes the process and doesn’t become too beholden to any particular project they’re working, success shall ensue when they least expect it.

    The Impact of Writing on Well-Being and Self-Development
    Michel Sabbagh

    TPN wouldn’t be the same without Isabella and the contrast between her sweet exterior and more malicious interior, and I appreciated the last few episodes’ attempt to further flesh out her character and reasons for being the way she is. Goes to show how external pressure can render an individual deprived of their agency and put them on a razor’s edge.

    The Promised Neverland: A Dialectical Analysis of the Antagonist
    Michel Sabbagh

    A textbook example of a work for all ages that deftly depicts mature themes and social commentary without ever losing its enchanting and hopeful touch.

    Moomins and the Finnish Culture
    Michel Sabbagh

    The Soulsborne titles also make for a good opportunity to channel one’s inner Stoic through perseverance and resilience. 🙂

    How Dark Souls Teaches Us to Accept Failure
    Michel Sabbagh

    For me, books—like all artworks—represent an opportunity for one to delve into the unknown (in the artistic case, another’s mind), so any attempts to ban—or burn—books merely on the grounds of protecting a state of mind from unorthodox elements strike me as a wasted chance for humankind to more readily embrace the unknown.

    Why Books Shouldn't Be Banned