AndyJanz

AndyJanz

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

6

Who is "The Bad Guy"?

Enter into a discussion about the identity of the villain in media and how this identity has changed and/or evolved over time. I think it would be interesting to take a sampling of different media over time (film, TV series, video games, literature) and analyze which group/people represent the "Bad Guy" in each and how that may correspond to the specific historical time period. Older Bond films often pit British intelligence against the Soviets – along with films such as Hunt for Red October – while many modern films concentrate themselves on Middle Eastern conflicts (i.e. London Has Fallen.) Does the bad guy always fall under a certain nation? Are directors forced to deal with the ‘politically correct’?

  • Looking at the shift in villain identity in media over time could be an interesting read! Over my lifetime I've seen an apparent shift from villains as just wanting to destroy the world into a character we can relate with, however looking back to when film first came out, it's easy to see that the villain was sometimes racialized as a form of propaganda. Bringing a variety of media into the discussion could be a difficult task and I wouldn't blame someone for narrowing that down. But who knows, maybe there's a direct correlation between when film came out in regards to literature or when video games came out in regards to film, that the new media type inspired a change in villain identity across the others? – Slaidey 3 years ago
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  • One could easily address this topic only using superhero films. Or even just one studio's superhero films. Or just one superhero's films. In particular I think of the richness of the Joker in his depiction of an enemy that thrives on conflict, without a past or real identity. – jackanapes 3 years ago
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French Revolution-era Paris in Assassin's Creed: Unity

Anyone who has played this game knows that the developers did a fantastic job. Anyone who has both walked the streets of Paris and played this game has most likely had their mind blown. I am the latter, and also a student of French language and History. The accuracy with which a Revolution-era Paris is depicted not only thematically but geographically accurate to an incredibly detailed degree. If anyone out there is a Revolution buff and enjoyed this game, aidez-moi!

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    Latest Comments

    AndyJanz

    I love the book as well – I think you are right in that they posses different elements and offer a great compliment to one another. I personally love the end of the book and the resolution to the conflict there as much as I love the ending of the film. It’s interesting how two very different ways of concluding the same story can be equally as successful.

    Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s "The Shining"
    Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s "The Shining"
    AndyJanz

    Please do! Let me know what you find!!
    aj

    Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s "The Shining"
    AndyJanz

    It gets better every time!! Thanks friend!

    Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s "The Shining"
    AndyJanz

    I can’t truly be sure what your friend, the “production designer”, thought about the film’s intention. These are simply questions that arise from me, an audience member, after watching. As far as I’m concerned, audience interpretation has little to nothing to do with authorial intention. If the creator didn’t intend something but the audience finds it anyway, does that mean it’s not there?

    Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s "The Shining"
    AndyJanz

    Very true- some cuts had to be made! But for a film lasting around three hours, I hesitate to describe it as “short”!

    Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s "The Shining"
    Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s "The Shining"
    AndyJanz

    If the creator didn’t intend something but the audience finds it, does that mean it’s not there?

    Where’s Johnny? Questions left over from Stanley Kubrick’s "The Shining"