ApeX

ApeX

One clever little monkey who has stumbled into a world of fictional delights. I spend my time consuming "geekery" in it's many forms, and produce original ideas now and the

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Latest Topics

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Cosplay Rising: from sub-culture to pop-culture

Look at the rise of cosplay in modern culture, and speak to this once dark convention niche. Speak to key influences (Big Bang Theory, cosplay models, rising comic/gaming culture, etc…) and hypothesize how cosplay has become more accepted (or not) compared to what it was even as early as a decade ago. I would also recommend including social media and outlets like Imgur and Reddit as influences. Conclude with an educated opinion on whether cosplay is here to stay, or whether it would eventually shrink back to subculture status. This topic is categorized as comics, however modern cosplay taps: gaming, movies, literature, anime, and much more.

  • I think this would fit better in the Arts category. As a cosplayer myself, I think that it's important for whoever is writing this to discuss the occasionally toxic nature of the art - incidents of bullying and harassment are sadly too common through internet and in real life. – DullahanLi 5 years ago
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  • Excellent point! I am a cosplayer myself and I agree whole-heartedly. I wish I had thought to classify this in the Arts, that would be a far better fit. Not sure if I can re-classify a topic after submitting it. The harassment, bullying, and sexism that can exist around cosplaying is a great bit to include. Sad as it is, it's become such a prominent aspect of being a cosplayer. – ApeX 5 years ago
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  • Yeah; I'd love to see this in the Arts section. It's a huge topic with a lot of angles, so maybe it's worthy of more than one article. In the Arts section, a focus in the article could be an examination of all the custom-made pieces that often go into elaborate costumes -- not only sewing, but custom jewelry and metal-casting for buttons or other embellishments; wood-carving; etc. – Monique 5 years ago
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  • One aspect that would be good to explore is the movement from a craft and skill (I made this!), to a consumer culture (I BOUGHT this!). How the second has (potentially) diluted the attention and appreciate of the art the first represents. – carboncopyben 5 years ago
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Alfred Pennyworth: Overpaid Slave?

Alfred Pennyworth, known to most as "Alfred", has been a longtime servant of the Wayne family. At his father’s dying wish Alfred decided to carry on the family tradition of serving the Wayne family, which has taken him on a whirlwind adventure as a butler to not only Bruce Wayne, but to Batman as well. Batman fights crime in it’s many forms, however it appears (from time to time) that Alfred is little more than a slave to his masters wishes. The web of secrets he must keep has, on occasion, robbed him of his free will. His master’s activities have also forced Alfred to compromise his personal wishes/ethics more than once. Discuss the relationship between Batman/Bruce Wayne and Alfred. Is Alfred a free man?

  • I'm not as learned on the Batman Universe as I'd like to be but whoever does take this up, I would suggest acknowledging the fact that as Bruce's caregiver since the deaths of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne which makes Alfred something of a father figure as well as Butler. This, in my opinion, serve as a fair balance between free man and servant. On one hand, Alfred is responsible for Bruce's life but on the other, Bruce decides how Alfred acts. How are these two relationship between father and Butler reconciled and does Alfred do a good job in reconciling them? – SpectreWriter 5 years ago
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  • Interesting thing about Alfred; he is the only member of the bat family that is aloud to carry a gun. He is not a slave because he quit being a british spy to be a butler instead, plus Batman cares for Alfred like a farther figure. Alfred can also talk back to Batman when he is out of line, clearly showing he is not scare to be around Bruce. – Aaron Hatch 5 years ago
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  • I agree that an analysis of the Bruce/Alfred relationship could be a fascinating one, but Alfred is far too much a father figure for Bruce to call him a slave. He is deeply loyal and loves Bruce like a son, which keeps him from leaving, but he is also the only who can be openly sarcastic and critical without censure. On many occasions and in many ways Alfred has been the last line of defense for Bruce's health and sanity; if he wanted out, he could have let that happen time and time again. So "slave" is the wrong term... but they are an extremely co-dependent pair. – Monique 5 years ago
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  • I agree that I went a little on the nose with this one. I think what I was really tring to get at was the secrets that Alfred keeps, which have been thrust upon him without any level of actual consent. Could he actually leave that life behind knowing what he knows. Does what he know bind him to Bruce/Batman more so than his employment, and how does that affect he freedom? He certainly signed up to be a butler, but to be the many other things he has, maybe not. Great points raised by all. – ApeX 5 years ago
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  • My understanding is that Alfred became a father figure to Batman. In one issue where Batman was seemingly killed, Alfred says that he "lost his son". Perhaps this attachment differentiates Alfred from slaves? Maybe Alfred chooses to stay and keep Bruce's secret like a father overlooking a son with problem. – idleric 5 years ago
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Where did all the Good Heroes Go?

Modern comics highly regard the anti-hero as the new go to stereotype. Gone are the days of shining knights, and in their stead stand deeply flawed "heroes" who are thrust, most unwillingly, into roles that beg them to save the day. Conduct a comparison between heroes of old and modern comic heroes, and determine whether there is a place for the old "white knights" in modern comic franchises.

  • This is a very interesting topic. There are people who consider the "white knight" to be an idealized hero that may come across as one dimensional. A good addition would be to discuss whether or not the anti-hero is adding complexity to the character. – missmichelle 5 years ago
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  • Great idea! I think that it would be interesting to see how cultural mores/ethics have changed as well as how taste has changed to support these "new" superheroes and what they stand for – DClarke 5 years ago
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  • Might be worth looking at potential shifts in readership from entertainment (far as I'm aware comics use to be the norm to read) to wish fulfillment. The anti-heroes might be seen as easier to relate to while still maintaining the admiral qualities that the readers want in themselves. – WingerZ 5 years ago
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  • I feel like we live in a very post modern world that favors realism over illusion. Many people like to see themselves in their heroes so that the common humanity is clear. It's much harder to get attached to a character that we don't see as flawed. I think that's just the world we live in right now- we don't want idealized caricatures of what life is supposed to be, but something a little more raw and relatable. – SomeOtherAmazon 5 years ago
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  • on the same note I wonder if this is a good thing. Do the idealized characters inspire us to be better versions of ourselves? Do we lose that in these anti- hero types? – SomeOtherAmazon 5 years ago
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Latest Comments

ApeX

This is a well written and insightful look at not just the game, but the role it plays in the overall lore and chronology of a very scattered game franchise. Thank you for sharing this!

Hyrule Warriors Review: A Bright Future for Zelda
ApeX

What was it that instilled that sense of sadness? I ask only because I left with a completely different feeling, and I am curious to know whether I missed something, or if I just gravitated toward different content.

Jurassic World: Human Psychology and Animal Behavior
ApeX

This article does a fantastic game great justice. It puts to words exactly what I have been trying to say for the last year in my gaming circles, and I am more than happy to share this with them so as to say: “See! I’m not crazy! Other people out there think this game is incredible too!”

What rang true to me of this game was how, though similar to games of a similar vein, it stood out as genuinely original. The music, gameplay, difficulty level, and mechanics found a way to use tried and true formulas, but remain somehow fresh.

Brilliant article!

Why Shovel Knight Would Be the Perfect NES Game
ApeX

I hate to lean on a writer’s “golden years” but I share your opinion. I don’t know if he could ever achieve the same level of impact that he had in the ’80’s, and fear that he will always be caught competing with that permanent image of his younger self.

Frank Miller's Return To Batman Comics
ApeX

I am of the opinion that Roverandom would make for a fantastic animated film, of the same vein that many Pixar movies fall within. It is a fairly whimsical tale, and was primarily a bedtime story for his children.

What I like about Roverandom is that it has somewhat darker undertones, akin to Lloyd Alexander’s Black Cauldron. I think it would make for an entertaining movie that both young and old audiences could get into.

Tolkien to Film: What Could Come Next?