Adnan Bey

Adnan Bey

Writing is my life, my love, my passion, my hobby. I was born in rural Kentucky, USA and now live abroad in Lebanon where I majored in English Language and Literature.

Correspondent I

  • Plebian Penman
  • Common Writer
  • Aristocratic Author
  • Lurker
  • Pssst
  • Hand Raiser
  • Vocal
  • Outspoken
  • Sharp-Eyed Citizen
  • Town Watch
  • Detective Deskman
  • Penman Patrol
  • Motivational Columnist
  • Phi phenomenon
  • Actor
  • Animator
  • Animaniac
  • Otaku
  • Article of the Month
  • ?
  • Articles
    16
  • Featured
    15
  • Comments
    352
  • Ext. Comments
    113
  • Processed
    118
  • Revisions
    105
  • Topics
    33
  • Topics Taken
    4
  • Notes
    78
  • Topics Proc.
    103
  • Topics Rev.
    19
  • Points
    4403
  • Rank
    6
  • Score
    3385

    Latest Articles

    Animation
    48
    Film
    105
    Anime
    52
    Anime
    36
    Anime
    243
    Animation
    38
    Anime
    102
    Animation
    49

    Latest Topics

    6

    When Filler is Good

    Sometimes, filler is dreaded. It’s a time when an Anime fills in a gap with unneeded material, usually to give it’s source material time to give them more material, and fans start letting out a groan of frustration. But it’s not always bad. Sometimes, it’s good. This article would explore when filler is actually good, and by good, we define it as something that, in a way, adds something to the fictional world or plot of the show.

    • I have been actually thinking about doing an article like this! Once it gets approved, I would love to write this! – Kevin Mohammed 2 years ago
      0
    • Nice idea! Yeah, I feel the same. I honestly don't mind filler if I feel it adds to the story in some dimension. It's only annoying if it seems like there is no point in having it. It reminds me of the trend of splitting the finales of book-to-film adaptions into parts or extending small books into long, saga-like movies. I didn't mind it in the case of the Harry Potter films, but there are other cases where it felt like just an obvious cash grab. – aprosaicpintofpisces 1 year ago
      0
    • I find that a filler episode is helpful when the show gives us something to contemplate, it helps explore the evidence through the characters' perspective and maybe offer a little extra insight. I've been watching an anime called Endride which has a filler episode, based on how the show presents its evidence on the issues of the show, I think its rather useful in that sense, but that's just my opinion. – RadosianStar 1 year ago
      0
    • Fantastic idea! You can also take into consideration what lines up with the manga (if one is available) and if said filler is actually filler since it's in the manga. – OldxSoul 11 months ago
      0
    • I think filler can be fun in more action oriented, or serious type anime. The filler episodes are when more silly or daily slice type of behavior can be seen from our heros/heroines. Example: protagonist usually in battle or tough situations casually goes to an all you can eat buffet. – bluishcatbag 11 months ago
      0
    • Filler is definitely important, and I think you can make the structural argument that filler can at times sign post the end of a dramatic arc or plot development and signal the beginning of a new one. Kind of like a space between two important arcs or as a signal of a turning point? What immediately comes to mind is the school festival in the first season of Code Geass - it serves as a break between "things going comparatively alright" and "things falling apart" and also signals the cause of the transition – phaasch 10 months ago
      0
    4

    What Makes a Musical

    Is it correct when people say that a musical must have a basis on stage? What, by definition is a musical? Should Disney movies count as musicals? Must musicals be live-action or can they be animated? Does Mary Poppins count? What strictly, is a musical?

    • I think for this it's important that the writer take all different examples of animation, live action, stage, film, different genres, etc. etc. etc. and compare and contrast them. Also, it'd be a good idea to look at musicals across the world, as well as, check out a good old-fashioned dictionary entry. – Jaye Freeland 2 years ago
      0
    • Musicals make for great topics. Especially when you look at context. During times of economic recession, war and great instability, musicals flourish as a genre. I love musicals as a genre and am so happy that it has been revived. I think Disney should definitely count as musicals, since they have contributed so many songs. – Munjeera 1 year ago
      0
    • It could be useful to compare the musical to the operetta (See Works of Gilbert & Sullivan). – JDJankowski 1 year ago
      0
    • It might also be interesting to show a possible connection between musicals and music videos. – green16 1 year ago
      0
    • What would be interesting is a comparison with musicals and movies with signing and see how they differ. If they really are different in any way. – VeeTee8 1 year ago
      0
    • Musicals for the stage and musicals that are animated or made as a live action movie do tend to differ in a few ways- these are often referred to as movie musicals, as acting for the screen is very different from acting on stage. Subtle differences do validate subgenres within musicals, and it would be worth looking into. Try looking into musicals that originally aired as a movie then moved to the stage (I believe Newsies was one of them, and there's many more) or vice versa. – HeartofAvalon 1 year ago
      0
    2

    Are MMOROPG's Taking Over the Video Game Industry?

    Will there come a point where systems and consoles are obsolete and the franchises migrate to online instead. We’ve seen it happen with Legend of Zelda and Elder Scrolls. Might this happen with Pokemon? Kingdom Hearts? Will this repel some fans or bring in new ones?

      1

      Filler Outside Anime

      Anime is mostly known for filler, but sometimes, even books or movies, TV shows or anything else, can have filler too. This article would examine such instances and how they were received.

      • Did no one catch the obvious problem with this topic before they approved it? How is Anime "mostly" known for filler? A prominent trait of Anime is filler. But Anime is "mostly known" for filler," it's mostly known for crazy hair, loud screaming, school girl sailor outfits, and magic. I get the intention of the description, I just find the opening line misleading and poorly phrased. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
        2
      • With Anime, filler episodes are more or less obvious because there's likely source material (manga or light novel) that it's being based on. For, say, Western, live-action TV shows, what would be a "filler" then? I think it would be important to first define what a filler episode is! As for the second part, I'd imagine most audiences don't like fillers. But in the case of a show like Gintama that's both innovative and meta, fillers can actually be a highlight! – txl 2 years ago
        0
      • I think better wording for this would be that most Anime is notorious for having fillers, most of which is uninteresting and bleak, rather than it is known for fillers. Then again, as mentioned previously, some do fillers right. So open up the discussion to which Anime had good filler arcs and why that was, and what needs to be done in order to make fillers more interesting and engaging. – andreacr 1 year ago
        0
      1

      When Anime Ends

      Sometimes, an Anime ends before it’s supposed to, or it ends in a poor way, a way devoid of any meaning. Surely it’s not just a decision on the part of the directors to discontinue it without giving a coherent ending. Anime like Pandora Hearts, Blood Lad, and Darker than Black gives that sort of vibe. Why does this happen, what options can a viewer explore if they want to satiate their hunger for more?

      • Some animes end because the viewer rating expectation is not fulfilled. Pandora Hearts is still ongoing as a manga, so technically it didn't end. It just wasn't funded in that medium. – Jill 2 years ago
        1
      • Yes, and that's sort of what I'm talking about. I know the manga is ongoing, but what caused viewer rating to go down? Why not give the first season an open-close ending and leave whether or not to continue on how things look later? – SpectreWriter 2 years ago
        0
      • This wouldn't have anything to do with how Gangsta ended? Because... that ended on a cliffhanger from what I heard. – DustinKop 2 years ago
        0
      • Often money or lack of money is the primary reason anime's end prematurely. Furthermore, the ratings for the anime could be too low to justify continuing. I think that the manga versions can sometimes be more successful than the anime, and vice versa. – Jiraiyan 2 years ago
        1
      • I agree with the previous comments. As with any series, even Western, live-action shows, anime end because of poor ratings. It's all about the bottom line! – txl 2 years ago
        0
      0

      Pirates of the Caribbean- Should it Continue?

      Since The Curse of the Black Pearl, Pirates of the Caribbean has been a major franchise for Disney. However, ever since the end of the original trilogy, it’s sort of lost its original flair. Should it continue? What should Disney do to revive interest when the fifth one does come out? Why make more?

      • Maybe detail a few of the major flaws from On Stranger Tides, and how the series has gotten worse from it's premier to it's latest flop. – luminousgloom 2 years ago
        0
      • I was surprised at how... flat and lifeless, and even copycat-ish "On Stranger Tides" both looked and felt in comparison to the Gore Verbinsky trilogy. Nothing about the production looked or acted authentic, and it seemed as if everyone was simply going through the motions in an attempt to recapture the same magic. Almost like the film could have better served as a TV special rather than a theatrical production. However, I think the two key flaws here are the director and the writer(s), as is quite often the case. A more imaginative writer and a more stylistic director would greatly improve the chances of Pirates of the Caribbean regaining its former footing again. I absolutely adore the first three films, almost all equally, because when it comes to movie magic, and great movie-going experiences, I just can't think of anything more perfect and indicative of the concept than Pirates. Pirate stories in general are pretty damn awesome. So I'd love to see them do more if they can make it work. Though, it might actually be nice if they moved away entirely from Jack Sparrow, and created a new lead character who's also a Pirate of some unique background, and gave him a new crew of misfits. That might allow the franchise to revive itself. I love Jack, I really do. But Johnny isn't going to be young and fit for much longer, and I really don't want another Indiana Jones 4, where we keep the same actor around just because they were the coolest part of a franchise. Yes, you will never be able to truly replace them, but you can at least try, or create a brand new character who can be played by someone with a bit more youthful energy. And for Pete's sake, can we please go back to the grimy, greasy green color grading? "On Stranger Tides" felt like the whole movie was lit with flourescents, and it was just too darn pale. Like... that's not what a "Pirate" movie should look like. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
        0
      • Agreed, completely. Changes in directors made the Pirates movies feel more like a removed special, something far removed from canon into something else, something foreign to the Pirates magic. – SpectreWriter 2 years ago
        0
      • I hated the opening scene too. It was too slow, too bizarre, confusing, and shoehorning Jacks dad in again was unnecessary. The opening to Pirates 2 was much more quirky and entertaining. I also never fully understood why Barbosa looked so bad by Pirates 4. Was it all like... a side-effect of his ressurection, where he's hyper-aging and decaying right before our eyes? I don't get it. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
        0
      • What about its original flair is missing? Maybe clarify on that. I can see how they are sort of going a different direction with the series now, but I did notice that Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley will be back, which is actually really confusing. Try adding your thoughts on how they remove and bring back characters. – kendalld 2 years ago
        0
      2

      Pirates of the Caribbean: Glory of Piracy

      From the first film, Pirates of the Caribbean has basically focused on the inherent code of piracy. But there’s a moral dilemma here. Does it defend piracy? Does it deplore it? What message does it send to kids who watch the movie? In the end, are the British Royal Navy really the bad guys?

      • Swashbuckling and looting on the high seas have always captivated readers. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island told tales of seafaring outlaws that filled their days by having endless adventures. Their missions included visiting islands seeking riches, battling vicious savages and fighting the oppressive British Navy. The lifestyle of piracy was not entirely anarchistic because loyalty was carefully measured using laws; these supported by an honorable self-governed system. The pirate code of conduct was a way to punished captured enemies as well as providing a necessary social contract between the captain and his crew, an accord that if broken, resulted a stroll off the plank regardless of their rank. More importantly, why was this society revered or even respected by audiences? Is it the little guy taking on the big bad government? These were killers, rapists, etc. It seems odd that we vilify modern day Ethiopian pirates with machine guns yet Europeans are romanticized? Is only white piracy glorious? – Jason052714 2 years ago
        1
      • I believe in one sense the film also shows people's perception of what piracy was during the colonial era. For those who approach to write this particular topic, it would be essential to understand what were some of the circumstances that gave rise to piracy in this time period, and why people misunderstood pirates. – aferozan 2 years ago
        1
      • I don't think the film, in any way, actually condones the act of piracy. Because at no point do we ever see the "hero" pirates, actually steal anything of value (in large quantities anyway) from any innocent bystanders, towns, villages, or rich people. Barbosa's crew ransacks Port Royal because he's desparate to get back all of the gold pieces that belonged to the chest of Cortez, which had cursed them all. But after that point, not a single pirate is seen actually doing what Mr. Gibbs referred to as "a spec of honest piratin'. We DO, however, see them go on adventures, duke it out with a few ships through cannon fire, find ancient treasures and maps to yet more treasures, and involve themselves with curses and magic. All of which are perfectly acceptable things within a fictional story and universe. Yes, they are pirates. Yes, pirating is entirely and morally wrong. Yes, the British Navy and Lord Beckett are actually in the right (for the most part) but are portrayed as the antagonists, simply because we are meant to side with the pirates because our protagonists are with them, and we do not wish to see them die at the hands of this manipulative, egocentric, and pompous businessman. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
        0
      • Also, I completely disagree with Jason052714's suggestion that only white piracy is glorious, or can be glorified in media. Clearly there were numerous ethnicities involved in the Pirates films, and who were part of many different crews. I took to liking each and every pirate in those films because of how entertaining they were. Their race never changed my perception of them. In fact, the films never once gave the impression that race mattered at all when it came to Pirate comradery or the Pirate laws. Everybody on each crew seemed pretty swell with each other. So in this way, I don't think race is the reason we don't glorify modern piracy: it's the fact that older piracy has been heavily romanticized by 19th century literature, and 20th century media. The pirate is an explorer: an anti-heroic figure with no rules and no life obligations. They simply go where the wind takes them. And much like Jason and the Argonauts or Sinbad the Sailor, Pirates have been known to encounter legendary mythical beasts and hazards which made their search for "burried treasure" all the more magnificent to read or learn about. Modern pirates have no such romanticising of their exploits, except perhaps among themselves, and maybe certain people who appreciate what they do for whatever reason. But this would have likely been the same back when Pirates really existed. You would have had a majority of people completely against their actions and existence, but a select few who thought they were a magnificent bunch: mostly likely because the pirates themselves were spinning tales about their travels just like any sailor worth his salt might have done once they reached port after each trip. In modern time, and modern society, however, we have much less room for appreciating people like them, ironically or romantically, and no reason to even romanticize the waters of our world, because we know so much more about them now. Ultimately, there is simply too big of a difference between the image of Captain Hook, Black Beard, or Jack Sparrow, and some angry guy on a rusty metal barge holding an automatic weapon in 2016. The time periods aren't the same, the circumstances and worldly awareness of society isn't the same, the costumes and vessels aren't as imaginative or majestic, and their choices of weapon don't leave the same visual or fanciful impression. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
        0
      • I don't think the films so much defend piracy as much as it romanticizes it. It creates this opposition between Barbosa's crew and Sparrow's, and adds in the British Royal Navy as additional pressure for the protagonists, but if they weren't defending themselves from these two groups of people, they certainly would not be volunteering at homeless shelters and reading to the blind. Because the films romanticize Sparrow's group, it keeps the film from actually having to deal with the moral dilemma, especially since Barbosa's group is dehumanized when they are exposed as being living-dead. As for the message it sends to kids, the films were rated pg-13, or at least the first one was. The fact that it is a sort of period piece displaces it from modern times to the point that the kids in the audience of the series might not recognize any content in the film that could be applied to current-day life. The only thing, that occurs to me at the moment, that might affect kids watching these films is gender roles. Although the main male characters do not seem as violent as the enemy, Will is often driven by this need to keep Elizabeth safe, which is stereotypical for male roles. But Elizabeth does not play the role of the typical damsel in distress, and throughout the film, and the entire series, she finds clever, sometimes cunning ways to save herself. I'm not sure how that ties into the theme of piracy, but it does sort of perpetuate the stereotypes of males as the protectors, or seeking revenge, or being violent and courageous by nature, when, obviously, men vary a little more beyond that. – Jenn 2 years ago
        0
      2

      Link: Young or Old

      The Legend of Zelda has always been about Link. Link is generally a young boy/man setting out to save Hyrule from the forces of evil, most of the time that being Ganondorf. However, the identity of Link is sometimes called into question. Is Link a young boy or a man? Ocarina of Time used both, but the Toon games like Wind Waker, Phantom Hourglass, and Spirit Tracks use a young boy. Originally, it is well known Link is a boy. What changed for the creators to make him a man in Ocarina of Time and Twilight Princess? And what changed to make them change him back again? What does this do for the franchise? Does it help or ruin it?

      • It might be helpful to refer to the timeline given by the game creators in the Hyrule Historia: which also brings up the question, are they all the same character at different times, or different characters united by striking similarities? – Luthien 2 years ago
        1
      • They're different. Wind Waker practically confirms this. – SpectreWriter 2 years ago
        1
      • This could be really interesting if the article takes a slightly different direction and discusses the perception of Link's masculinity and how that changes based on his age. In some of the games where he is depicted as younger, his relationship to the female characters in the game is different than when he is older. When he is depicted as a young man, there seems to be somewhat of a bachelor's complex going on: most of the female characters are in love with him, or make comments about how he is "cute" and whatnot (examples: TP, OOT). This is a conscious decision made by the creators of the game. How does it play into perceptions of heroic men? How does Link's performance of masculinity change based on his age? How does his relationship to women change? Ocarina of Time would be a particularly good study because it shows his growth from a child to a young man. – Emilie Medland-Marchen 2 years ago
        0
      • For anyone writing this, research into the timelines is really important as well. It's sort of been made official by Nintendo in Hyrule Historia, but before that was released there were many theories about the different Links and their relationships to one another floating around online (check Zelda Universe). You'd have to decide whether to use the official Nintendo timeline (which is not accepted by some game theorists) or explore the other in-depth theories. – Emilie Medland-Marchen 2 years ago
        0

      Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

      Latest Comments

      Adnan Bey

      Eh… if it is, it’s not part of the Disney movie. I never saw any such ending.

      The Darker Corners of Pinocchio
      Adnan Bey

      Good question. I usually despise it when people come back from the dead but Han coming back… I’d be happy but at the same time, I’d be underwhelmed, disappointed. So… mixed feelings, mostly pissed off.

      Gosh, the Main Character Is Dead!? So, When Do They Come Back?
      Adnan Bey

      I believe TV trope refers to it as Death is Cheap.

      Gosh, the Main Character Is Dead!? So, When Do They Come Back?
      Adnan Bey

      Well, I dunno about the book but the movie implied he was brought back because God did it.

      Gosh, the Main Character Is Dead!? So, When Do They Come Back?
      Adnan Bey

      a la Dragon Ball Z.

      Gosh, the Main Character Is Dead!? So, When Do They Come Back?
      Adnan Bey

      I actually really hate it when characters resurrect in anything. The only exception was Gandalf and I made that exception in spite of my usual standards. I despise DBZ for that reason. I can’t stand resurrection freely handed out just because.

      Gosh, the Main Character Is Dead!? So, When Do They Come Back?
      Adnan Bey

      Well, they didn’t really know they were aliens until later, in the heat of more intense parts. No time to show alarm.

      Lilo and Stitch: The Seven Standards of Disney
      Adnan Bey

      And Nani is a major pain for Lilo 😀

      Lilo and Stitch: The Seven Standards of Disney