celeste239

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Latest Topics

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    Do historically inaccurate re-telling's perpetuate ignorance

    Can authors and auteurs play with the past without perpetuating ignorance and false narratives within our history. Take the lack of political stance in Marie Antoinette (2005) for example and the films dismissal of Marie’s involvement in the French Revolution.

    • This is pretty much already done with the Nasu verse/Type Moon series. Characters in this anime series have their gender changed from what it was historically. This is usually done for entertainment purposes. So, being inaccurate in a retelling does not matter unless you are presenting your information as accurate. If you are trying to be accurate then one should do their research and try and get to as close to the truth as possible. Ultimately it really just comes down the authors intentions. (Which we may not always privy to.) – Blackcat130 5 months ago
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    • I found this topic interesting from the viewpoint of invulnerability and ethical closure of the reader. Although authors and auteurs use a certain amount of truth and fiction when writing history, history should be written from the standpoint of knowledge and responsibility. For example, the author's lack of political stance in Marie Antoinette (2005) doesn't clarify Marie's role in the French Revolution; this leaves the audience vulnerable and perpetuates ignorance by interpreting history inaccurately. I find this extremely important from an epistemic perspective; writers need to work towards truthful narratives. – Richard 5 months ago
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    • Or, to think about it the other way, is a story ever retold that is an accurate portrayal? Nostalgia overtakes fact and memory very quickly. It's why we see memes that talk about how great the 80's was compared to today and 20 years from now, we will say how great things were in the '20's (2020's) because as things change, we view change as a loss and that perceived loss leads us to reflecting on that past through rose colored glasses. – Amie709 5 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    This is a super interesting concept. The horror film ‘The Descent’ from 2005 also follows this notion of fear in silence and the fear of being heard, which establishes that this idea is something which has been prevalent for many years. Perhaps you could say this is somewhat of a self-consciousness that we as a society have developed where the idea of being watched or caught is an extremely harrowing thought.

    Hollywood's Fascination with Silence and Horror

    I really liked how you brought in the Greek notions of eros, philia, and agape. I think a film without well developed versions of these concepts never seem to contain nostalgic value or allow audiences to form close and relatable connections with the characters and their world.

    Star Wars, Love, Loss & Redemption

    I think your discussion of Frankenstein not being appointed a female counterpart is very intriguing. It raises a discussion on the softening of male characters (who are written by women) when a female counterpart is involved. The male characters once violent and ‘masculine’ nature is partly distinguished, only returning when their significant other is in danger and in need of protecting.

    Men Written by Women: Dreamboats or Brutes?