Celeste Reeb

Celeste Reeb

A graduate student in English Lit. with a focus on Film Studies. I focus on Sound Track studies, Post-Colonial studies, and representations of violence. All while drinking tea

Junior Contributor III

  • Lurker
  • Pssst
  • ?
  • Articles
    2
  • Featured
    1
  • Comments
    33
  • Ext. Comments
    19
  • Processed
    3
  • Revisions
    1
  • Topics
    0
  • Topics Taken
    0
  • Notes
    5
  • Topics Proc.
    0
  • Topics Rev.
    0
  • Points
    350
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    190

    Latest Articles

    Sorry, no topics are available. Please update the filter.

    Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

    Latest Comments

    Celeste Reeb

    While I can understand what you are saying I think that there is a major difference in Scorsese’s approach to this film. Everything in the film takes on a double meaning. Upon re-watching there is a new level of irony that becomes explicit. I feel in most “twist ending thrillers” this dedication to detail is not present. It is more than just re-watching knowing the ending and saying “oh how did I miss that”. It becomes an entirely different experience. Choices at the sonic level and all of the small details ensure that the film is read differently on each viewing. I think the soundtrack shows that their is a level of craft in this film that expands past the usual thriller tropes. Thanks for reading and commenting!

    Shutter Island: Mahler's Musical Fragments, Irony, and Fairy Tale
    Celeste Reeb

    Do it! I encourage everyone to watch it a second time and absorb all of the new meanings. Thanks for reading.

    Shutter Island: Mahler's Musical Fragments, Irony, and Fairy Tale
    Celeste Reeb

    Watching this film a second time is so much fun because you know the ending. Everything takes on new meaning. Watching it a second time does not mean the ending is any easier to figure out though. Thanks for reading!

    Shutter Island: Mahler's Musical Fragments, Irony, and Fairy Tale
    Celeste Reeb

    There is always small details that the audience never notice but they add to the overall effect of the film. Everything in film is a choice and this extends to the music as well. Thanks for reading.

    Shutter Island: Mahler's Musical Fragments, Irony, and Fairy Tale
    Celeste Reeb

    Nice write up. I have not read all of the novels you mention but I get a good feel for the patterns etc. I am a huge fan of Sci-Fi dystopian novels. I think that as long as there is trauma there will be dystopian novels. There is a major difference when looking at the pattern in YA dystopic novels and the “classics”. The system was not beaten in 1984 or Brave New World. These older novels usually focused on smaller individual stories rather than someone saving the entire population. I think the YA aspect or teenager as you pointed out plays a part in how these newer stories are told.

    Sci-Fi stories have always been cautionary stories set in the future about the present. The current dystopic novels are less Sci-Fi and more Dystopic Melodramas. This is not to say they are bad but that they are different. The threats are different. The classics were in reaction to the atomic bomb, censorship, and classisms (and other -isms). From your write up it seems that this is not the threat these newer novels are speaking to.

    Again, nice write-up. Thanks.

    The Rising Popularity of Dystopian Literature
    Celeste Reeb

    Lovely list. I think the beauty of Pixar is that there are several other moments you could have included. This is not a failure on your part but speaks to the depth of their plots. I think that Pixar has continued to be respected without the ups and downs of other animation studios because of these moments. While they make me cry, I would rather cry than be numb. Thanks for the list!

    10 Mature Moments in a Pixar Film
    Celeste Reeb

    I really enjoyed reading your piece. Jane Eyre is one of my more beloved novels. I think you took a good approach to analyzing the ending (considering how much is written about the novel using a feminist approach). I have always found the economic issue of the ending to be interesting. It is not until Jane is fiscally stable on her own terms that she allows herself to more fully embrace “wifehood”. Thanks for the article.

    Analyzing Jane Eyre as a Contemporary "Bad Feminist"
    Celeste Reeb

    Thanks so much.

    How Disney's "Hell Fire" Illuminates the Struggle of the Subconscious