DankileLin

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Watching A Film Alone vs With Company

    With film being more accessible on personal devices such as laptops, tablets and phones, movies are just as likely to be viewed in solitude as with family or friends. How great would the impact of those around you be on the experience of watching a film?

    • One always has to take into consideration how others act and because of this, it's sometimes nice to watch television alone. I know some people who like to talk and ask (sometimes unnecessary) questions during a movie/show which is distracting and frustrating. Watching a show/movie with family is not always easy either because no one wants to watch the same thing and an argument potentially follows. – JennyCardinal 4 years ago
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    • Film genres should also be considered. Comedies are typically enjoyed best with friends, while psychological thrillers may be best digested with solitude – Dominique Kollie 4 years ago
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    • I'm inclined to argue that a plot driven work is proportionally more rewarding to watch with company, as you have the formal mechanisms of plot to engage with socially, discuss, whatever. More "character driven," perhaps dialogue heavy films, you're expected to turn your social faculties over to the characters. Here, company in watching it might not detract from the experience, but you're only immersed insofar as you're leaving your company behind. – TKing 4 years ago
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    • I enjoy watching a thriller or intellectually heavy film with others where you're bouncing off theories amongst one another. When it comes to melodramas--such as emotional period pieces--I tend to become emotional, and therefore prefer to watch this particular genre of film alone. – danielle577 4 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    Great read. I love Angela Carter, and I thought that you explored both stories quite well. I particularly enjoyed your take on white snow and roses, two recurring symbols throughout her collection.

    Angela Carter's Beauty and the Beast: Building a Feminist Romance

    In my opinion, Infinite satirizes game endings the same way Bioshock (the first one) does to choice. Like you so eloquently said, Bioshock foregrounds the fact that we never truly have any choice in the game– despite our impressions of them. Infinite criticizes the player for expecting the choices made during the game to affect the ending by having only one (as opposed to the original Bioshock’s multiple endings). Infinite shows that choices can be significant without affecting the ending; they intrinsically matter because it characterizes Booker/the player and creates your individual experience. In a sense, the ultimate goal of the game is not to reach the ending, but for the player/Booker to spend time with Elizabeth in a way that is unique to every experience.

    Bioshock and the Illusion of Choice in Gaming

    Interesting read. In the series finale (“Felina”), Skyler says to Walt that she doesn’t want to hear him say that he ‘did it’ for the family anymore, to which he replies: “I did it for me.” Do you think this is Vince Gilligan trying to challenge his ‘good will’?

    Breaking Bad: The Appeal of Walter White