Dena Elerian

Dena Elerian

Dena is a freelance writer and proofreader. She enjoys helping others while accomplishing personal goals of growth and prosperity.

Junior Contributor I

  • Articles
    0
  • Featured
    0
  • Comments
    3
  • Ext. Comments
    3
  • Processed
    0
  • Revisions
    0
  • Topics
    1
  • Topics Taken
    2
  • Notes
    6
  • Topics Proc.
    1
  • Topics Rev.
    0
  • Points
    51
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    33
Sorry, no posts matched your criteria.

Latest Topics

2

In writing, is it more important to create or to perfect?

What is more important when writing:
The Creative Process?
or
The perfection of structure, language usage, and grammar?

  • I think it would be interesting to approach this topic by examining the creative process in its entirety, i.e. the importance of creativity versus perfection when coming up with the idea in the first place, creativity versus perfection when writing a first draft and creativity versus perfection when editing. – PhoebeLupton 2 years ago
    2
  • I tend to agree with Phoebe's comments. In my case when I write the first draft it's very much in the 'stream of consciousness' vein, just letting it all flow out and getting the ideas down on paper (or screen) before they vanish. If we edit as we go then we tend to over-edit and be too self-critical. My advice is write with your 'right brain', then edit with your 'left brain'. Oh, and a good cup of coffee helps too :) – Amyus 2 years ago
    2
  • I agree with the comments above; the creative process and the perfection of structure complement each other and each act is more useful than the other at different stages of the writing process. However, I think that there's another interesting question implied by this topic: which draft features the writer's most sincere and authentic voice: the intuitive, free-flowing, and spontaneous first draft, or the meticulously crafted final draft? – Vertov.Isou 2 years ago
    1
  • Nice topic, but perhaps a bit too broad? I'd narrow in on a subtopic that deals with both creation and perfecting, such as how and when to make your inner editor be quiet. – Stephanie M. 2 years ago
    1
  • Forget perfection, you'll never write. I've seen colleagues over the years waiting to do their magnus opus and they still haven't written. Writing leads to better writing and better writing to even better writing. – Joseph Cernik 2 years ago
    1
  • This is a good question, I agree with Joseph Cernik that if you're aiming for perfection than you'll never write. You'd scare yourself off before you even pick the pen up. With saying that it is still important to always edit and re-edit your work. And Remember keep on writing! – Kylie27 2 years ago
    0
  • intriguing, but i think im going to have to say create. polish is polish. – Glimmerkill 1 year ago
    1
  • I was reading Stephen King's 'On Writing' the other day, and cannot but feel that if the thing doesn't exist, it cannot be perfect. Much like Vertov.Isou's comment, the drafting process often contains the authors real and true intensions, their most sincere and authentic voice. In this way, the creative process is so much more important than the perfection of the writing. – Hodge 8 months ago
    0
0
Pending

The return of the polymath?

Are Polymaths making a comeback?

  • In what respect? I'd suggest a few examples, perhaps from popular culture or books that you've read etc, to back up your suggestion, otherwise all you have at the moment is a generic question. This could make for an interesting topic though. – Amyus 2 years ago
    4
  • The title piqued my interested as I have been reading about Leibniz in my Modern philosophy class. Leibniz was a philosopher, librarian, mathematician, diplomat, and scientist. Author Matthew Stewart called Leibniz, "the last of the polymaths" in his book 'The Courtier and the Heretic'. So as far as I know, a polymath is a person who dabbles in multiple fields, though a google search reveals a wider definition as it simply states ' a person with a wide range of knowledge or learning'. Stewart's definition implies more, a proficiency in multiple disciplines.Our current age is an age of specialized knowledge and the economy of efficiencies it produces, hence the reasoning that the polymath is dead. With the expansion of knowledge, it it possible to be a polymath and still support oneself in society? I'd suggest taking a look at some of the modern philosophers. – BeyondKanji 2 years ago
    0
  • I think it's a potentially topic, but why does it matter that Polymaths have or haven't made a comeback? Will they have a positive or negative effect society? – Jiraiyan 2 years ago
    0
  • Polymath as in the term "Renaissance Man." Periodically that term is used in movies, say James Bond knowing the track conditions at Saratoga Race Track, then knowing how to reprogram a missile, and finally knowing best how to serve Sake. I'm not sure the notion of the well-rounded scholar or knowledgable person has ever disappeared. This just needs development. – Joseph Cernik 1 year ago
    0

Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

Latest Comments

Dena Elerian

I agree that the stigma needs to go away. Comics are very relevant to today just look at the main blockbuster movies that are highly popular.
Those who still maintain this stigma maybe do not understand comics or graphic novels. Maybe they should give them a chance.

The Social Stigma of Comic Book Reading
Dena Elerian

I think it is possible. Look at the popularity of “Otome” games on the App Stores such as “Midnight Cinderella” or games from a series called “Shall We Date” and many more. Young women (and men?) pay $$$ to play these games and spend time with their “love interests”.

Can You Really Fall In Love With a Fictional Character?
Dena Elerian

Traveling is a great way to experience new environments first hand and can definitely contribute to a greater passion within writing. A worthwhile investment.

Travel and literature: Broadening your horizons