Burkely Hermann

Burkely Hermann

A recent MLIS grad who loves archives, libraries, history, poli sci, genealogy, reviewing pop culture, watching anime & animation, and doing research for fun.

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Latest Topics

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Feminity, gender roles, and girl power in magical girl anime

Many are likely familiar with well-known anime like Sailor Moon or even Cardcaptor Sakura. But, how do these anime, and others in the magical girl genre, counter (and support) existing gender roles? Are they empowering or do they support existing beliefs? Answering these questions, with available resources, would be an important part of any article on this topic. Such an article could also compare and contrast with Western animation, showing the differences between those animated shows and anime. In any case, this topic is broad enough to allow for a litany of articles, of various types, on this subject, no matter which one the writer chooses to follow.

  • I think this topic is actually really interesting. I think that looking at gender roles in such a specific context is a really good way to go about it. Good job! I hope someone picks up this topic! – RheaRG 3 weeks ago
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Latest Comments

Burkely Hermann

A good article all around. I think there is no doubt that white princesses will have overarching journeys that speak to the themes you highlighted. I was going to point out Tangled as well, as she first tries to figure out her place in the world and new responsibilities (in Season 1), discover more about her past (in Season 2), and returning to Corona (Season 3) to fulfill her “total birthright.” Although you say that “Disney movies featuring white heroines haven’t been quite as brave as ones featuring POCs yet,” that’s not completely true, as Rapunzel was brave in the animated Tangled movie, and White princesses have showed bravery in their respective movies. Besides, if there are more POC princesses, all the better! Sure, there can be White princesses now and then, but they should not be the majority of those in such stories. There need to be more POC princesses (or princess-like) characters, such as Luz Noceda in The Owl House, or Cleopatra “Cleo” in Cleopatra in Space. In any case, the princesses you mention have improved the Disney princess narrative, without a doubt.

How Princesses of Color Have Improved the Disney Princess Narrative
Burkely Hermann

Like the other commenters, I would say this is a good read as well. The fact that anime is more popular in the U.S. than in Japan raises the question: who is this anime being made for, anyway? Can it even be considered a “Japanese cultural product”, as you could call it, anymore? In any case, this article is well-argued and I agree with its conclusions. Without a doubt anime has an adverse affect on women. There are very few series which do not have at least some fan service. Sadly, that seeps into a lot of anime with LGBTQ characters. I appreciate the author brought up Sailor Moon as not objectifying women. I haven’t watched much of Kuroshitsuji / Black Butler, and have not watched FullMetal Alchemist, Princess Jellyfish, One Piece, Evangelion, Chobits, Bleachm High School of the Dead, or Strike Witches 2. After watching Cardcaptor Sakura, I would say that it includes well-rounded female characters, so that would be a good addition to your article, as would an anime I watched this morning, Burn the Witch. I agree with the conclusion that it is time to end “hypersexualization of women in anime.”

Anime in America: The Adverse Affect on Women
Burkely Hermann

I like how this article deconstructs Made in Abyss, showing how it has a feminist veneer but actually is just like any other anime by putting characters into traditional gender roles. I haven’t watched this series, but if I do, I’ll keep this article in mind when watching it. Some have made hostile or negative comments, but I actually think this author makes a compelling case.

Made in Abyss: Gender Politics