jwiderski

jwiderski

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Tidelist

    Japanese Horror: What to Watch Next

    After watching Ring and The Grudge, some horror fans can be at a loss of where to go next. Here is an eclectic mix of J-Horror for you to try out next.

    Audition, 1999, Dir. Takashi Miike
    A lonely widower holds an audition in order to find a girlfriend. Unfortunately for him, the woman he selects has some dark secrets that destroy their relationship and even his life.

    Battle Royale, 2000, Dir. Kinji Fukasaku
    A class of delinquents is stranded on an island, forced to kill each other over the next three days. If there isn’t one person left at the end of those three days, everyone dies. Hell breaks loose, with friendships and rivalries being taken to whole new levels.

    Dark Water, 2002, Dir. Hideo Nakata
    A recently divorced mother moves into a run-down apartment building with her daughter. The constant presence of a mysterious handbag, dripping water, and strange appearances of a dead girl threaten the mother’s sanity.

    Hausu, 1977, Dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi
    Six girls travel to one of their aunt’s house for vacation. But after decades of living alone, is the aunt still the same woman she was?

    Ichi the Killer, 2001, Dir. Takashi Miike
    Depraved hitman Kakihara is out for revenge when his gang’s boss is taken out by a mysterious assassin. What follows is a blend of dark humor and disturbingly graphic imagery.

    • I'm not sure if you would call Battle Royale a horror, but it did have its gruesome moments. I can't believe I was able to watch that on my own! – YsabelGo 5 years ago
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    • I thought I left a comment but maybe it didn't go through. If you're talking about great horrors and you include Hausu and Onibaba, I feel there is a need for Jigoku and Kwaiden. Otherwise, solid list of the Japanese horror notables. – Connor 5 years ago
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    • I've never experienced Japanese horror. It sounds interesting! – trapgrandma 5 years ago
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    • I'm afraid of scary things. They didn't actually used to bother me. I can pinpoint the EXACT movie that ended my scary movie watching. The Ring hahaha. Never been the same. I had to have my parents remove my TV from my room so I could sleep. So I'm sorry to say, that even though a lot of these sound super interesting, I'm going to stick to the ones clearly marked as "more suspense than horror." Haha. – Tatijana 5 years ago
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    • Great list! I'll be sure to check these out. – Emily Deibler 4 years ago
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    • Japanese are the best at horror! – crolins 4 years ago
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    • Japanese are the best at horror! – crolins 4 years ago
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    • You always gotta love a brilliant Japanese horror! – Kevin Mohammed 4 years ago
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    • Good article! I'll check it out. – lolreconlol 4 years ago
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    • Japanese has made many famous horrors like Ju-On. I don't think Battle Royale is the horror for real but it is an exceptional piece to define the human ugliness. – moonyuet 4 years ago
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    • Great list: I especially enjoyed Uzumaki! – Barselaar 4 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    jwiderski

    I would love to hear your thoughts on more specific representations, particularly more popular ones like Orange is the New Black. I’m very happy that we’re making progress, but a quick look at the representations out there show we have a long way to go.

    Transgender Characters on Television: Quality vs. Quantity
    jwiderski

    I like the stance the article takes. It starts off seeming like a general list and condemnation of the trope, but as the article develops more emphasis is put on the importance of context. There’s no apology for the trope or simple hatred for it, but a genuine consideration of its place in comics. Bravo.

    Women in Refrigerators: Killing Females in Comics
    jwiderski

    Kind of weirdly structured, but a solid article overall. I always freeze up when people call comics a “diverse” medium. I’m very used to the all white, male/female, straight dynamic that comics have had for the past almost century. While diversity has increased in the past decade, at times it felt very forced and representation for the sake of representation. Of course forced is better than none, but I’m still not sure comics are to the point where anyone could call them diverse. Progressing, but not quite there.

    Sexuality in American Superhero Comics