ralphpolojames

ralphpolojames

Junior at the University of Iowa. Interested in Frank Ocean, Wes Anderson, Kyrie Irving, Hiro Murai, and everything in between.

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Empathizing With Serial Killer Protagonists - Barry

Barry is a "dramedy" television series following the life of Barry Block (his stage name), a man who is a former marine turned hit man that aspires to become an actor in Hollywood due to his hatred for having to murder people (who are often innocent). Barry feels the need to go to extreme measures in order to pursue his career in acting which results in the murder of several people whom he considers friends or colleagues. Is it appropriate to empathize with a character who performs such immoral actions?

  • For interesting topic. I also think that comparing Barry to someone like Dexter or other antagonistic protagonists would be a good idea. Are redeeming qualities and remorse for human nature strong enough for the audience to disregard serious moral questions such as murder? – Pamela Maria 2 years ago
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Latest Comments

ralphpolojames

This was an incredible read, it opened my interpretations to each of the episodes you reviewed to a whole new world of understanding. I’m incredibly intrigued to see what your input is on the newest season, “Black Museum” stands out in particular. The format of this article was well organized and easy to read, it made me eager to move on from each paragraph’s transitions into the next.
I specifically enjoyed the portion of the text analyzing “The Entire History of You” and the distinct anxieties that are attributed to a person when they commit to becoming a human cam-corder. I think that tied in really well to the “Shut Up and Dance” section where humans are constantly in a state of concern regarding what is distributed to the public from their own privacy. This is something that’s clearly evident amongst social media users in our modern society, and it’s interesting to observe the lengths that people will go to in order to prevent their deepest secrets from being exposed.

Black Mirror: A Look at Modern Day Paranoia
ralphpolojames

Yes, absolutely, it’s necessary to watch this series on chronological order. The first episode “Winter is Coming” is a tone-setting episode that really captures the entire essence of the show in the first 60 or so minutes.

How A Feminist Watches Game of Thrones: Power Is Power
ralphpolojames

I really appreciated the comparison and specific similarities between Cersei and Arya. It makes me more appreciative of Cersei as a character, because although Arya physically contributes to one of the highest kill totals of all the characters in GOT, Cersei contributes to that same achievement through her constant scheming of sitting on the Iron Throne (like blowing up the Sept). It makes me curious as to how these characters would react, whether it be similarly or differently, to each other’s circumstances. Wouldn’t Cersei have the same amount of vengeance and desire to make something right out of something that was wrong like Arya’s determination immediately after she witnesses Ned’s beheading? This analyzation of feminism in the world of Westerns is incredibly enlightening as far as my appreciation for female characters in GOT goes and the immense amount of powers they display.

How A Feminist Watches Game of Thrones: Power Is Power
ralphpolojames

It’s interesting to consider someone as ignorant and slow-minded as Charlie Day as a legitimately emotionally unstable stalker that assists in the ruining of people’s lives. For someone who is typically favored by younger audiences for his jolly, happy-go-lucky attitude, Charlie would be labeled in real life as exactly this, a lost and curious gnat-like human that is completely incapable of getting the hint as to when to leave someone alone. Perhaps that’s what provides such immediate comic relief, realizing that in real life Charlie Day and The Waitress are actually married, but on screen, their lack of chemistry is clearly apparent although Charlie (the character) will refuse to admit it. I really enjoyed the scope you put on this article, it was incredibly well done.

"It's Always Sunny" and Why We Laugh at Bad People