Mela

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

Junior Contributor III

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

    4

    The Gray Area Between Good and Evil

    Within comics and movies, heroes have slowly been developing more flaws while villains are beginning to produce a more human face. More so, with the rise fandoms, readers and fans have begun to appreciate both; picking favourites and encouraging this type of development for characters. By examining older heroes and villains and how they have developed/changed over time, as well as, the rise of the "flawed hero" and the "human villain", are we slowly entering an age where there is no right answer? Or will "true villains" be forced to be purely "evil"? Analyze both the negatives and positives of this within a writing context — will this change how plots and characters are being written? Will the definitions of what a "villain" or "hero" are, have to change? And will this bring in a new era of "grey" as opposed to the archaic, early form of writing that was strictly black and white? Or is our perception of the "character", "plot" and writing becoming deeper and more advanced?

    • Interesting topic, but please make sure to go over it to fix some minor punctuation errors. "Favourites" is actually spelled without the "u." Also, commas must be placed within the parenthesis. You also end your fourth sentence with both a question mark and period, which you cannot do. – Diego Santoyo 8 months ago
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    • Diego, I believe Canadians and the British spell favorite with the u, Americans don't. – Tigey 8 months ago
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    • I wasn't able to update my topic before it became accepted, so here is the proposed revision:Within comics and movies, heroes have slowly been developing more flaws while villains are beginning to produce a more human face. More so, with the rise fandoms, readers and fans have begun to appreciate both; picking favourites and encouraging this type of development for characters. By examining older heroes and villains and how they have developed/changed over time, as well as, the rise of the "flawed hero" and the "human villain", are we slowly entering an age where there is no right answer? Or will "true villains" be forced to be purely "evil"?Analyze both the negatives and positives of this within a writing context -- will this change how plots and characters are being written? Will the definitions of what a "villain" or "hero" are, have to change? Compare and contrast the potential backlash and consequences. Will this suspension of "grey" initiate a return to the classic hero? Or will this bring in a new era of "grey" as opposed to the archaic, early form of writing that was strictly black and white? Or is it our perception of the "character", "plot" beginning to change into something new; bringing in a new era of writing that is deeper and more advanced?Possible characters to look at may include: Joker, Bucky Barnes, Jesse Pinkman, and Jean Valjean, Dexter, etc. – Mela 8 months ago
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    • A character that could be a good focus on the gray area concept would be Deadpool. Although comedic, the character displays characteristics that could classify him as both hero and villain. – AngeloCruz 8 months ago
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    • Another good character to focus on could be Tony Stark from Iron Man, who is the perfect example of a flawed hero. – mariamvakani 7 months ago
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    • A good character to focus on is Walter from Breaking Bad. Lots see him as an evil man and others see him as a man who did bad things but with good intentions. – sabrinakasymov 7 months ago
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    Batman Arkham Knight: Destruction of Characterization?

    An extremely popular and successful franchise, the Batman Arkham series is yet another universe added to the Batman canon. However, the latest addition to the series brought in the controversial role of Jason Todd — the former "second" Robin who had been murdered by the Joker — as the "Arkham Knight" and main antagonist of the game. Most fans expressed their outrage for the use of Todd’s character and the way it was conveyed within the Arkham Verse, along with (yet again) using the over saturated Joker trope, and Batman’s decision with the "Knightfall Protocol". Was this addition to the gaming series poorly plotted out? And most importantly: was the characterization of these iconic characters destroyed by the Arkham verse canon?

    • I would argue that another reason there was disappointment with the "Arkham Knight" was not just that he was Jason Todd, but that it was so painfully obvious that he was Jason Todd. I think a lot of people were hoping for a brand new baddie to add to the Batman franchise but received a variation of the Red Hood instead. – Logan 11 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    Yes, the most common mental disorder that the cinematic and superhero franchise chooses to focus on is PTSD. They’ve done a great job so far, with both Iron Man having panic attacks as well as the silent suffering of Steve Rogers adapting to the twenty first century. However, PTSD is often assumed and suggested as well as the only mental disorder that gains attention. I also find it interesting, and although I didn’t mention it in my article, PTSD is a great way to draw attention towards mental illness because of, as you mentioned, how many people suffered and because of how understandable it is for superheroes to develop it. Thank you!

    Disability Bound Superheroes and the Representation of their Struggles

    Sorry, I meant to reply to Tarben’s recommendation of “The Ables”. However, I agree. With the cinematic universe of both Marvel and DC unraveling in popularity I really do hope they choose to represent both mentally and physically disabled characters more often.

    Disability Bound Superheroes and the Representation of their Struggles

    I’ll have to give it a read! Thanks for the rec!

    Disability Bound Superheroes and the Representation of their Struggles

    Very creative and an interesting viewpoint! I wasn’t familiar with Anderson’s version of the little mermaid, but I know that Disney often puts a much more childish and happy twist to their portrayal of fairytales. I do enjoy the darker aspects of fairytales and I’m really glad you explored this topic. Great read!

    In Defense of the Conclusion to "The Little Mermaid"

    Honestly this is so inspiring. I love poetry; reading, writing, enjoying it but it is a dying medium in terms of popularity and it can be difficult to sit through and enjoy. This is such a great way to not only mix media with it but also to refresh the genre! This also reminds me of this video game that came out a few months ago called “Elegy for a Dead World “. It’s function is to turn players into writers and poets and although I haven’t tried it out yet, I really love the idea of mixing digital media with traditional media. Reading, writing length novels, poetry, journalism is all turning into a dying art (slowly) and it’s nice to see new things created to change the game.

    Animated Poetry: A Starting Point

    I think this is really great for further opening the discussion about what “diversity” should be in comics from weight, to gender, sexual orientation, nationality, religion, etc. However not sure if I totally agree with this. From one perspective, I really do think it’s important that we embrace all types of people and they should have equal representation in comics and movies, however, when does it become too much? In a sense of: are we broadening the diversity of these characters just to please the masses or with good intentions behind it. Also, I don’t want to come across as rude but, depending on the superhero/villain I think weight really is a factor. For instance Batman, who has no supernatural powers what so ever, goes through insane training regiments to be able to do what he does and I just don’t think it’d be possible for him to be overweight. Also, say, a supernatural hero like Flash who literally runs all the time… I just don’t think it’d be possible for him to be overweight since despite running fast, he’s still running. Nonetheless, someone such as Green Lantern or even Scarlet Witch whose powers go beyond physical exertion and don’t really need to be physically fit would make more senses.

    Overweight Superheroes and Supervillains

    Really well writing article and I think you pegged Spectre perfectly — people aren’t sure what they want within a Bond movie. On one hand, Casino Royale was amazing because it was so emotionally charged and really changed the face of Bond however not everyone was pleased with it. I myself must admit that I didn’t enjoy the movie at first because to me, he wasn’t James Bond. Unfortunately, the classic 007 really is a womanizing, macho, god-like agent and I loved it for that. The freshness was almost too stinging and like I grouchy old man I missed the old Bond. However, with how Quantum Solice and Skyfall turn out your absolutely right. Spectre should have followed the new trend. Apparently Tom Hiddleston might be the next 007 so I’m really curious to see whether they’ll go back to classic roots with him…

    Why was Spectre a Disappointment?