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Batman or Superman: How do their moral values affect the youth of today?

Analyze the aspects that make Batman and Superman inspiring, and then aim to understand which of these aspects could be beneficia, and which may be harmful. For example, Batman is one of the most self disciplined characters of all time, but at the same time, he goes against the law and constantly breaks the rules. How much of this should youth today aspire to be like?

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    Is Batman really a Superhero?

    A superhero is defined as a "benevolent fictional character with superhuman powers." Batman essentially has no super powers. He can’t fly, run abnormally fast, or anything spectacular. There is clearly a very distinct line between Batman and what is defined as a superhero. On the other hand, he can perform better than an average human. Batman is a great character because people can look up to him and realize that its possible to be like him. It gives hope to the readers of the comics. He inspires the audience to believe that they can have a great impact on the world, even if they don’t have any super powers. Regardless of his impact on his fans, Is he really a superhero or not?

    • I would describe certain aspects in order to develop your topic further. – BMartin43 10 months ago
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    • Great idea for a topic. I think it depends on the criteria of the definition of "super hero". Finding a definite definition of the term might help to influence how the topic proceeds from here.I don't really think that there is a right or wrong answer to this question, but just depends on how you define super hero and other terms related to the character.Great topic! – SeanGadus 10 months ago
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    • He is 100 times better than a normal human. – KnowledgeFirstFinancial 10 months ago
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    • I think if you narrow the criteria so much for a superhero (i.e. superpowers, benevolence), it'll become harder to see a character like Batman as a superhero. Heroes like Batman blur the lines of good and evil. He certainly does good things for Gotham - cleaning up crime, stopping murderers, etc. - but he is also a vigilante that the police (the other "do-gooders") hate. He is very much human but is also created and thriving under special circumstances. He's a complex character and I think that definitely needs to be considered here, as well as a more definite definition of what exactly a superhero means, as suggested above. – karebear7 10 months ago
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    • In Watchmen there was a lot of distinction made between the costumed heroes/vigilantes' and the one 'superhero,' Dr. Manhattan. This prompt is mainly definition-based, so I might go into the word's etymology? 'Super' typically means above, literally or figuratively, so you could discuss the grounds for superiority? – m-cubed 8 months ago
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    • If a superhero is based on the willpower to kickass and save the world, yes, but if it's based on having super abilities then no. However, that brings into question Hawkeye - who, essentially, has no superpower. Can just kickass at archery haha. Same with Joker, he's just a maniac and super psychotic. This is a cool topic, for sure! If I was a DC fan I would totally try my hand at it, but I don't have enough knowledge about Batman! – scole 8 months ago
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    • Do you believe that any of the people that Batman saved from imminent peril would say, "Well, that was nice. But he isn't a superhero, he's too rich." IN a way, I think that your strict definition of what makes a "superhero" might be pigeon-holing your argument quite a bit. For past generations, the mutant human with super strength or the ability to fly may very well have been the norm for what makes a superhero- as you stated, with "superhuman powers." IMO, Batman doesn't fit your definition as a superhero, he REDIFINES it. In a modern, capitalist world, someone could easily become a "superhero" strictly through financial means. – AndyJanz 8 months ago
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    • There's how we define the "super" part of the word, but there's also how does one define a "hero". Is a hero a literary hero, someone who follows particular narrative arcs, someone who upholds a particular morality, or just the protagonist of a work? Are they a hero because they save people, or because they fight crime? Then are emergency response personnel and police also their own type of hero? – sk8knight 8 months ago
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    Batman Arkham Knight: Destruction of Characterization?

    An extremely popular and successful franchise, the Batman Arkham series is yet another universe added to the Batman canon. However, the latest addition to the series brought in the controversial role of Jason Todd — the former "second" Robin who had been murdered by the Joker — as the "Arkham Knight" and main antagonist of the game. Most fans expressed their outrage for the use of Todd’s character and the way it was conveyed within the Arkham Verse, along with (yet again) using the over saturated Joker trope, and Batman’s decision with the "Knightfall Protocol". Was this addition to the gaming series poorly plotted out? And most importantly: was the characterization of these iconic characters destroyed by the Arkham verse canon?

    • I would argue that another reason there was disappointment with the "Arkham Knight" was not just that he was Jason Todd, but that it was so painfully obvious that he was Jason Todd. I think a lot of people were hoping for a brand new baddie to add to the Batman franchise but received a variation of the Red Hood instead. – Logan 1 year ago
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    The Employment of the 'Bat-Voice'

    Analyse the methods/extent of effectiveness of the use of the ‘bat-voice’ by the likes of Michael Keaton, Kevin Conroy, Christian Bale etc. and how it plays into the different dimensions and tones of their respective series.

    • Maybe include not only how the different voice techniques play into the stories but also how the voice helps define Batman within that story. – TheLegendofPie 2 years ago
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    • Maybe focus on how certain Bat-voices are treated in pop culture at large. – FantasticMrMac 2 years ago
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    The appeal of Batman and how it has managed to evolve with the audience.

    Batman has been such a big staple in comics and has remained that way for decades, why is there such a resonance with audiences? Also, the audience for comics has largely changed, as well as what people expect from their comics. What has Batman done to remain captivating for people and fresh after so long?

    • I think half of the appeal of Batman is the fact that he's ordinary. He has no powers, he's not from another planet- he's a man trying to do the right thing. – SomeOtherAmazon 2 years ago
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    • I agree, most of his appeal is that he's an ordinary guy. He's wealthy and a business man so you have an "American Dream" aspect there but he uses his money for good. Batman has also evolved a lot through the many adaptations and I think part of the appeal is that audiences are excited to see what spin a new director will put on him. – Kathryn 2 years ago
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    • I personally love how dark the Batman universe is. Batman goes through some pretty heavy stuff, and DC isn't afraid to press their luck with how dark things can get. I think this makes it relatable in a way, because we don't always face our problems in life with a BOOM! POW! WHOP! superhero attitude. Bruce Wayne faces his problems as a regular home being, which makes it easier for us to identify with him. He also has faults, which we see regularly. He's just like the rest of us (except for the billions of dollars). – Christina 2 years ago
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