Suman

Suman

Yogi in the making, Harry Potter fanatic and lover of good food.

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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

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Representation of Harry Potter in 'Harry Potter and the Cursed Child'

Among the anticipated release of ‘Harry Potter and the Cursed Child’, readers were avid to know more about the Potter universe based 20 years after Voldemort’s defeat. But did the playwrights do an accurate job of representing Harry in the script? Readers might see him as stony, uncompassionate and cold- not representative of Harry. Explore why Harry might come off as ‘different’ and whether this is a possible interpretation of how he might be in the years after he defeated Voldemort, as he attempts to create a ‘normal’ life for himself and his family.

  • Well, the Harry we knew was Harry as a child. The Harry of the books is an adult, having faced trauma, accompanied by current real-life stressors and a slew of responsibilities. Also, people do change after traumatic events. Another thing to consider is the fact that when people are facing obstacles, they have a level of momentum driving them through each challenge; yet, once these obstacles cease to exist, the person can sometimes become lost and not know how to interact "normally," now that their world, as they've known it, has changed. Just a few thoughts... – danielle577 4 years ago
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  • Harry Potter, as we knew him at the end of Deathly Hallows was at the beginning stages of the transition into wizarding adulthood. The only glimpse we got of him as an adult is the epilogue, which was very brief, but it was all we had to go off of for nine years. It is important to remember that the 20's is another very important season of changing for most people, and Harry Potter shouldn't be considered immune to that at all. Another idea, this play is mostly told from Albus Severus's perspective. Perhaps this is why Harry does oftentimes read as cold or stony, especially when taking into consideration the conversations between Ginny and Harry about the father and son's relationship in the play. – EmilyEMeadows10 4 years ago
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Exploring the concept of the untraditional family in Dreamworks vs Disney films

Pixar films are usually comprised of the ‘traditional’ family and have only recently started to uncover what an untraditional family is (Finding Dory). Dreamworks, however, managed to address this topic much earlier, such as in the Shrek Series (Donkey Dragon) or Kung Fu Panda (Po has both an adoptive and biological father in his life). Has Dreamworks surpassed Disney on animating the concept of modern family in their films? Explore the expectations of how Disney is supposed to portray a family and did these also apply to Dreamworks?

  • I think just narrowing down this topic to the nontraditional in films will yield enough material to write an effective analysis. – Munjeera 4 years ago
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  • Disney might have been the first, but they have always been behind on the times (as the years have transpired). I agree with your assumption that they do feel they, too, need to address this relevant topic of the untraditional family in order to make impressionable children feel included as opposed to outcasted. Nice topic. – danielle577 4 years ago
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  • Steven Spielberg tries to incorporate non-traditional families, instead of focusing on what happens when the supernatural intersects with single parents or parents getting a divorce as in the case of Jurassic World last summer. ET took place in the context of a single parent family and Jurassic Park 2 had Jeff Goldblum with an African-American daughter and there were no references to if she was adopted or where her mom was, as far as I can remember. I heard in an interview that this is intentional. – Munjeera 4 years ago
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  • Behemoths move slowly. – Tigey 4 years ago
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Pixar's 'Braintrust' model producing high-quality films

Pixar produces some of the most high-quality animation films in Hollywood. Pixar president Ed Catmull attributes this success to the "Braintrust" model, a set of four rules Pixar teams should follow that aims to "remove ego" for the ultimate creative success. Very briefly, these rules include

1. Removing power structure from the group
2. Only lateral, peer-peer interactions (no subordinates)
3. All success shared between team members
4. Honesty from peers on ideas proposed

How is this seemingly simple Braintrust model the key to Pixar’s success? Further, can this model be applied to other forms of entertainment (such as anime, film, literature) to unleash the potential to create quality, well-received work?

  • I think this is an interesting topic to analyze, but does require some knowledge of business I would assume, as well as some research into Disney's success as compared to other studios, as well as the knowledge that Disney is probably the largest media corporation in the entire world. A look into Pixar's history and the success of movies produced after this model was introduced in comparison to movies before would be a good contrast to have in this article as well. – Nayr1230 4 years ago
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  • This sounds like a fascinating topic. Disney has also put into practice certain leadership ideals and their workshops available for business executives are legendary. I mean does anyone actually need anything from Disney, a cap with mouse ears? No of course not, but we all buy Disney. Their marketing strategies combined with corporate leadership has set the bar high. – Munjeera 4 years ago
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  • Wow, this is a really interesting topic. I didn't know that Pixar teams followed those rules, but obviously it's working for them. As for if that model could be applied to other forms of entertainment, I think it would be quite difficult for film production companies to employ because everyone's roles have their own set of rules (i.e. directors, editors, producers etc.) – shaniaclarke 4 years ago
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Latest Comments

Suman

I really like the way this article is written. Aditionally, I think that the Royal Tyrell Museum should be applauded for the way it emphasizes fossils as artwork. From what I can tell, the museum strives to celebrate history as much as your typical “oil on canvas” artwork is. This is so important because it is these fossils that have given insight and key knowledge to how humans/Earth evolved!

Are Fossils the New Art? Analyzing the Lords of the Land Gallery
Suman

I liked how you brought up that Disney princesses over generations have had to learn to balance between “femininity” and “masculinity” to be their best self. Modern Disney princesses in this way are so similar to today’s women. However, I hope that as time passes, traits are no longer denoted as “more feminine” or “more masculine”- instead women should simply choose the traits or lifestyle that allows them to be their best self. In any matter, it should be celebrated that Disney princesses are increasingly representative of the strong, successful women of our society. Thanks for the good read!

Masculinity and the Disney Princess
Suman

I’ve been reading Harry Potter for as long as I can remember; with the first book released in my early childhood and the last one in my early teens. To this day, this is my favourite series because I felt like I grew up with the characters because of similar age. Not only this, this series played an integral part in expanding my imagination and creativity. As you mention in your article, the books do a superior job at teaching love, understanding, and the importance of family/strong support system, and all characters are relatable, and this is what makes this series so great for all audiences. Not to mention I think the books are extremely humourous! These books are everlasting- they are my definition of “home”.

Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences
Suman

I always loved watching this film when I was younger- even though the unfortunate events that the four kids experienced horrified me! For me, the severity of the outcomes that the children experienced from them acting spoiled/bratty/behaving inappropriately helped me gain a fundamental understanding that those kinds of behaviour shouldn’t be tolerated (even in adults too). Reading this analysis was fun and enjoyable, especially because I think it’s spot on. Awesome!

Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory: Lessons for Parents and Children