TomWadsworth

TomWadsworth

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

Junior Contributor I

  • Lurker
  • ?
  • Articles
    0
  • Featured
    0
  • Comments
    4
  • Ext. Comments
    4
  • Processed
    0
  • Revisions
    0
  • Topics
    1
  • Topics Taken
    0
  • Notes
    4
  • Topics Proc.
    0
  • Topics Rev.
    0
  • Points
    34
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    26
Sorry, no posts matched your criteria.

Latest Topics

2

Envisioning VR: A wider look at the uses of Virtual Reality

Most of what we see to see in the media relating to VR technology seems to all come back to videogames. Certainly it’s one of the most obvious applications for the technology, having been brought up in numerous futeristic sci-fi scenarios, but what about outside of that? What are its other uses, perhaps in museums, cinema, or even the classroom? The ‘Scotland VR’ app might be a good place to start.

  • I know Concordia University's been working on VR and its multiple uses, Google as well. It could be worth a look. – JennyCardinal 4 years ago
    1
  • I think there's massive uses for VR outside of video games, or even general entertainment purposes. VR has massive potential in the education field, and I have seen some really interesting AR applications that allow people to examine anatomy/physiology in 3D space. I think I also saw something about using VR to explore battlefields during history lessons. Any kind of visual information seems like it could be more efficiently studied in VR/AR, especially as it adds an interactive third-dimension. I wouldn't be surprised if the military started using it for training purposes (if they aren't already). It's definitely a fascinating topic. – Ben Woollard 4 years ago
    0
  • Not only, I am using VR for presentations in design, to show the space, to immerse people in it and to actually be in the space, not just to see it on paper. – aichabrinley 4 years ago
    0
  • VR has been used in aerospace industry to visualize simulated airflow around the aircraft. Due to the time-dependent and 3D nature of the airflow, VR is a perfect technology to visualize the it. – yigu8115 4 years ago
    1

Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

Latest Comments

TomWadsworth

Hopefully I’ll be writing on Stories Untold soon in fact.

The Text Adventure: Relic of Gaming History, or Timeless Medium?
TomWadsworth

Even if more options are available these days, and games are more accessible, I definitely think there’s still place for text adventures. Check out Stories Untold, a set of four interlinked horror stories that came out his year, that play with the format eof a text RPG, old bugbears intact and all. Really engaging, and provides a much freshers kind of spook than a lot of stale modern horror games.

The Text Adventure: Relic of Gaming History, or Timeless Medium?
TomWadsworth

You’re right, videogames just aren’t suited to any kind of gallery space. You can appreciate a painting or photographs hung from a wall, a film in a cinema, or drama in a theatre. To me, games are much more close to books in how we experience them as art. A book is something you have to nestle in with, enjoy at your own pace and perhaps take the odd break to digest. Any of the games that’ve really hit me as interesting artistically are ones that I remember playing for anything up to 100+ hours, definitelt not something you can just nip into a gallery to um and ah at!
I’m glad to see that the industry as a whole is starting to pay more attention to ‘arty’ games though. Not to diminish the Call of Dutys and Street Foghters of the world, they have their own mertis, but certainly there are some examples of games that hold more meaning than others, and they seem to be getting more and more prevelant as developers experiment.

Games as Art: Displacement within the Art Gallery
TomWadsworth

Perhaps, but it’d be a shame if he did, childish too. Any artist should know that once they release their work into the world, it’s no longer really theirs. Tolkein was quite staunch in saying the LoTR wasn’t supposed to symbolis anything, he hated allegory in fact. But that’s never going ot stop people from interpretting and repurposing his work in their own way. That’s the beauty of any kind of art, it’s never static. It shifts and changes constantly depending on who’s reading it, and when.

The Influence of J.R.R. Tolkien on Modern Video Gaming