Yama144

Yama144

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Latest Topics

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    literature
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    A presentation of Michael Cunningham's "The Hours": Metafiction

    An article covering Michael Cunnigham’s novel The Hours , and its subsequent adaptation into a film.

    In a sense it could be a review article, but I feel there is a lot of groundwork for this i.e how realistic is the potrayal of Virginia Woolf. (does this matter?) 3. The role of the novel Mrs. Dalloway in fiction – metafiction (fictional analysis of fiction)
    (The phrase presentation, rather than comparison is used)

    • I wanted to write about this for my Film and Literature course but I got a little bit confused as to how to approach it, as I can imagine you are. Namely because its focus on three women is exciting but also complex. Perhaps it may be useful to create or highlight the connections between the three characters and address how these are translated on the film? – Aliya Gulamani 5 years ago
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    • yes exactly, there is a lot to cover. I put metafiction in the title because I was thinking of maybe focusing on the role of the book 'Mrs. Dalloway' in The Hours, and then any other analysis that emerges. Perhaps splitting it into a two , or even three piece article. – Yama144 5 years ago
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    • That's definitely possible. I really like the sound of this. I think the metafiction angle would be a lovely way to approach the book and take apart its complex structure. – Aliya Gulamani 5 years ago
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    1
    literature
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    Sleep and dreaming in Shakespearean Drama - 16thc Europe

    Briefly and broadly examine the role of sleep and dreaming in Shakespearean literature, and sleeping as a social construct within 16th century Europe (the Elizabethan period)

    Potentially using some material from Historian Roger Ekrichs book ‘ At Days Close: A History of the Night-time’ as it relates to the aforementioned.

    • Interesting premise. Hamlet's soliloquy easily comes to mind ("To sleep, perchance to dream..."). What other Shakespearean dramas deal with sleep and dreaming? – S.A. Takacs 5 years ago
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    • A Midsummer's Night Dream definitely. Also Romeo and Juliet, in the final scenes when Juliet is sleeping but Romeo think he's dead. Macbeth and The Tempest may also have some subtle but relevant examples. – Aliya Gulamani 5 years ago
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    • ' Hamlet's soliloquy easily comes to mind ("To sleep, perchance to dream..."). ' That is actually one of the quotes I was considering using as a starting point! Yes, A Midsummers Night Dream definitely! Thanks for the other references.I was also thinking of Othello. – Yama144 5 years ago
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    • Othello is a great play. Could you refresh my memory: where is sleeping/dreaming mentioned or in what context is it presented? Just curious! – S.A. Takacs 5 years ago
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    • Well I would have to re-read it, but I was thinking of referring to this article as well (if I can get my hands on it) “Shakespeare and Sleep Disorders”, Neurology 49 (1997): 1171–72.There are several references throughout Othello.... when I have time I'll post a few here.. – Yama144 5 years ago
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    3
    literature
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    Female narcissism in The Grimms Fairytales. (1812)

    Explore the portrayal of narcissism in the characters of The Grimm Fairytales , and how this has manifested in the representation in today’s popular culture and mainstream television. Are Grimm Tales really suitable for children? What makes them universally appealing? Could explore Philip Pullman’s adaptation of them.

    • This is a good idea but why specifically female narcissism, and not narcissism in general? Also, the Grimm fairy tales were not really intended for children originally. Although they were called 'Children's tales', many elements were thought inappropriate for children at the time and were changed throughout the tales' various editions. – Rachel Elfassy Bitoun 5 years ago
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    • Female narcissism because it hasn't been covered before simply. Actually they were not originally aimed at children, but have been culturally adapted for them. – Yama144 5 years ago
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    • ..also just add to that, that female narcissism is also prevalent within the Grimm Tales. – Yama144 5 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    Yama144

    ‘By portraying so many of their female characters as evil, Once Upon a Time dwells on the many negative stereotypes of women. Traits like vindictiveness and manipulation are especially prevalent in the female villains.’

    I do agree on the general negative potrayal of women in the media, but as far as’Once Upon A Time’is concerned this programme does have it’s roots in The Grimm Fairytales which are better understood if we realise that the ‘conventional flat characters’ in them , psychologically are characters with personality disorders. Snow White – the narcissist. Cinderella and Rapunzel are tales of narcissistic mothers who abuse their daughters.

    Given the social pressure for individuals and adult children to evangelise mothers eg with mothers day and associate sociopathy with men, with a slight predisposition to believing that women are incapable of abuse, I think its healthy so to speak, loosely to keep a balance as far as female representation goes, because female ‘villains’ do unfortunately exist.

    Once Upon a Time and the Villainization of Women
    Yama144

    Typing errors : * first and second line. Sorry!

    Colorful Haruki Murakami and His Ever-growing Popularity: Why do People Like His Works?
    Yama144

    I enjoyed this article, and I have enjoyed some of Murakami’s work,despite some the existential currently I am reading Colourless Tsukuru.

    Particularly ‘After Dark’, and ‘What I Talk About When I Talk About Running’. I found the former insightful,although a little pseudo-philosophical it was heart-warming in places.Hard Boiled Wonderland and The End Of The World particularly made an impression on me, as you pointed out he has the ability to create surreal, but realistic microcosms.

    And despite the existential dilemmas faced by his characters, there is sometimes a naivety about them which can make them appealing.

    I have never read any of Murakami’s work in Japanese , I always assume a little is lost in the translation.

    Colorful Haruki Murakami and His Ever-growing Popularity: Why do People Like His Works?
    Yama144

    ‘ They aren’t looking to devote time to learning something that deviates from their modern and fast-paced lifestyle, and instead, are only looking for something that will add to it’

    Although the article attempts to emphasise the cultural significance and context of yoga and find it incredibly judgemental and romantic.

    Despite yoga originating in Asia (though not restricted to India I might add ) just because an ascetic practice is beneficial to oneself does not mean that should not be targeted to a wider audience , regardless of whether this means commodification. Maybe this is the question that should be asked?

    Instead of singling out yoga, perhaps you should have aimed your criticisms and scepticism at the general fast food culture you have associated with the United States.

    There is anecdotal scientific evidence that yoga alleviates PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder)symptomatology and allows attuning of certain regions of the brain and the body’s response to stressors. Whether this is through breathing techniques (asanas), meditation remains to be seen.

    You seem to have gone into detail on the religious aspects of it, without touching on the concept of mindfulness- in a secular context.

    Just a couple of references to finish off, for those that might be interested:

    Damasio, A,R. 1999. The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Meaning of Consciousness. (an accessible science book written by the distinguished Antonio Damasio)

    Kolk Der Van A Bessel Ann.N.Y.Acad.Sci (2006) Clinical Implications of Neuroscience Research in PTSD.

    Why Yoga Isn't Really Yoga: The Trendy Path to Divine Hotness