Film

Latest Articles

Film
22
Film
30
Memento
Film
25
Film
35
Film
36
Film
32
Film
24
Film
25
Film
39
Film
26

Latest Topics

12

The Superhero Origin. Why?

Do you know the origin of how James Bond came to be a spy? Does it take away your enjoyment of the Bond films if you don’t? What about Indianna Jones? Movie after movie after movie, it’s still fun, they are like issues of a comic book series. Why does Hollywood insist on pummeling us with repeatedly telling us the origin of a superhero? Whether it’s 45 minutes of the "first" Spider-Man film, or a five minute recap to remind you (Batman vs Superman) before the next installment commences. Is it necessary? Can’t we just go into the next installment of the movie?

  • I agree. Origin stories lose the whole mystery. A good example is LOST where the final season explained how everyone got to the island and then proceeded to undermine the whole backstory with a finale that made everything out to be a dream. What a total waste of time and so disappointing. I definitely agree with you that I don't need an origin story. Familiarity breeds contempt! – Munjeera 1 year ago
    0
  • I personally love origin stories, if they're good and come out gradually. It's the same reason I love learning about an author after reading their work -- it often explains the actions and reactions of a character in a way that makes you want to read the story or watch the movie again and search for subtleties you may have missed in the character's various interactions throughout. – Cait 1 year ago
    2
  • I personally don't mind the background story as long as there are variations, of some aspect. If i were to go see two or 3 or etc. version of spider man movies and they all showed the same origin story then it would be pointless and i understand what you are saying then. Although by giving a back-round this also attracts the rest of the population that might not know all the facts about spiderman or etc. . – tranpreet 1 year ago
    2
  • It's a difficult question because on one hand fans want the film to be so faithful to the comics, the origin is necessary but on the other hand, it does take away a large chunk of the film which could have been used elsewhere to enhance the film further. Not having an origin could also confuse those who aren't familiar with the characters comic history. Depending on the character and context to the film, an origin should be explained in some way or another, whether it be ten minutes or even one simple line. – ajgreen94 1 year ago
    0
  • The origin of the superhero is interesting because it provides insight into the character's motives and drives. Knowing certain aspects that occurred before the individual reached this level allows the viewer to understand why they act the way they do and it does create a level of understanding and acceptance. The background of Batman is probably one of the most interesting; yet it does not have to be reiterated in every single franchise installment--this I agree with, 100%! I hope someone picks up this topic, especially with the upcoming onslaught of superhero films set to hit the big screen in the upcoming months. – danielle577 1 year ago
    2
  • In my opinion, an origin story, done well, brings a lot to a story because it shows you something about the hero's attitude to their status as hero. For Batman, understanding that he does what he does because of his parents' death throws light on what he's going through internally while he's out fighting bad guys. For Spiderman, seeing him first as a nerdy outcast brings a kind of humour to his sudden freedom when he becomes a superhero. All this brings vulnerability to the characters, which isn't easy to achieve in a genre when victory is mandatory and usually absolute. Interiority obviously isn't the main point of a superhero, but you've got to have some or the thing falls flat. For that, you basically have to reach into their past. – TKing 1 year ago
    2
  • I actually really love origin stories. In fact, you talking about how James Bond became a spy or how Indiana Jones became a treasure hunter really got my mind working. I don't think its necessary, but I think it's fun for audiences to realize why a character does what they do and feel a little more sympathy towards them. The same goes for villains, before I knew Harley Quinn's backstory, I didn't really have an opinion about her one way or another. Now that I do, I love her and think she's a super interesting character. – Jenae 10 months ago
    1
  • Ok, let's agree that an origin story is fun and interesting. I think 99% of the people by now know Spider-Man was bitten by a spider. The story is so well known. Spider-Man began in 1960's and ran monthly ongoing to the present with over 1,000 issues to his name. Only ONE issue contained his origin. (And that was in another title). We had 45 min origin in the 2002 movie, we had another 45 min origin in the 2012 movie. We wait so long for a movie to come out, do we really need another 45 min origin story in 2017 when there is sooo much to be told that hasn't. – DrTestani 10 months ago
    0
  • This depends on how the creator wants to the story of that character to be played out. Origin stories are good in order to see how the character came to be and why. Some origins stories can come in the beginning, like how Peter Parker became Spider-Man, or in the middle of the plot, like how Marinette and Adrien became Ladybug and Cat Noir in Miraculous Ladybug. Sometimes, there is no origin story and that is what makes it interesting; it makes the audience guess and look for answers on that specific character. Origin stories are what help make the entire story plot come together, as long as it makes sense. A good plot makes a good origin story. – Sagemaster1 9 months ago
    0
  • Any discussion of this topic needs to reference this article: http://www.npr.org/sections/monkeysee/2017/07/11/536508517/origin-al-sin-what-hollywood-must-learn-from-spider-man-homecoming – derBruderspielt 2 months ago
    0
  • Isn't the origin story part of the whole superhero story formula? For many superheroes, it's the explanation of how the human crosses some sort of line, enters a new realm, becomes the superhuman. I agree that the origin story needs to be creatively retold every time it's told, but I'm all for keeping it in the superhero story formula. – JamesBKelley 19 hours ago
    0
3

The Evolution of The Bank Heist in Cinema

Whatever happened to the good ole’ bank job? A small team of dedicated villains who cased the job, drew up meticulous plans and (sometimes) got away with the loot. These days we are used to seeing technological spectaculars with the villains often touting hardware and computer systems equal to, or even superior to, that of the Police. The Bank Heist has been a popular movie theme since the days of silent film making, but times move on and so do the brains and specs behind the operation. ‘Bonny and Clyde’ (1967) showed the simple, violent approach to robbing a bank; ‘The Italian Job’ (1969) had a more lighthearted spin and instantly made the Mini car into an icon. In more recent years we’ve had ‘The Bank Heist’ (2011) a Canadian comedy and the Las Vegas-style showmanship of ‘Now You See Me’ (2013), whilst the British films ‘The Bank Job’ (2008) and ‘The Hatton Garden Job’ (2016) both harked back to old school techniques. Of course the list is endless and these are just a few examples. Explore the evolution of the bank heist and not just in terms of the advance in technology over the years, but also look at the characters involved, what their motivations are and why we, the international viewing public, retain a fascination for such villainy. It’s not always about the money!

    9

    Is popular "geek culture" infantilising a generation of adults?

    A generation ago, merchandise for film/TV/anime/literature pitched at children and young adults was also aimed at children and young adults. In 2017, we are seeing a rise in merchandise pitched to adult aficionados – think Pokeball serving bowls and superhero-themed shot glasses. Do these trends mirror an entire generation that is unable to grow up? Is this just about rampant capitalism? Or is this generation of 20 and 30 somethings just passionate, and less ashamed than their Gen X and Baby Boomer family members?

    • Yes. But in a way it is nice to see people keeping their inner child alive. Last September I attended a ComicCon and was impressed by the quality of handmade items available by various artists. Also, in talking to some of these adults, I sensed that for them, their work was a real labour of love. It was an eye opener for me.I like your point that these are not shameful pleasures as in the past. I think Cosplay also could be included to support your point. "Embracing the Inner Child" could be a title here. – Munjeera 5 months ago
      6
    • Amazing topic. I've never really grown up, myself (my PopVinyl collection will tell you all you need to know about that😁). It might also be interesting to delve into the blurring of fact and fiction and how many young people on social media are using fiction to illustrate injustices in the real world. – AGMacdonald 4 months ago
      3
    • I think you'll need to make important distinctions between types of merchandise that have gotten more popular; there have always been statues and t-shirts, for example. But now you see leggings and underwear, pop figures, piggy banks, etc. There are Rick and Morty (and Mr. Meeseeks) plushies! It also, obviously, depends on the show. – IndiLeigh 4 months ago
      4
    • I'd like to comment on just this one question: "Do these trends mirror an entire generation that is unable to grow up?" I don't think that's the case at all. I think it's very possible to be a highly functioning adult and still not fully put away childish things, regardless of what we find in the "good book." – JamesBKelley 19 hours ago
      0
    5

    The Use of Music in Baby Driver

    Analyze the use of music in the film. The music Baby listens to becomes a major part of the movie’s score and also serves to punctuate many of the film’s amazing chase sequences; it is often synced perfectly to the action, as Baby is meticulous in timing the music just right. A film’s score is always deliberately attuned to the story’s plot and themes, but do the musical choices, timing, and the fact it is usually coming from a character’s iPod produce a new or different effect upon the viewer?

    • I have yet to see baby driver but I hugely appreciate a good soundtrack in a movie so this topic would be great to explore the importance of music in film and how it can at times be equally as effective as special effects and dialogue. The Dark Knight trilogy is a great example of this as I believe Hans Zimmer's composure on that made it all the more amazing. – AdilYoosuf 1 week ago
      3
    • It would be helpful to add a track-listing for the Baby Driver soundtrack, and possibly a link to its iTunes page so readers can have a place to sample songs track by track in case they forget a song. – TeriekWilliams1988 1 week ago
      1
    • I recently watched a clip from an interview where the actors talked about the fact that music was a big part of this film already in the scripting phase. They even wrote a special program to help readers experience the story and the music together while they were shopping it around. https://youtu.be/RB7E0geIeV8 – derBruderspielt 1 week ago
      0
    5

    The differences between the DC and Marvel cinematic Universes and why we care so much

    Since the two companies became huge competitors in the comic book industry, DC and Marvel have split fandoms and caused many heated debates among their followings. Why is this? Why do people swear that Zach Snyder films are terrible and say Superman is a boring character, and than praise the Marvel movies? Are there biases involved? Do DC movies simply not put enough jokes in them? Why all the hate? And is there any hope that it will be acceptable to enjoy DC movies as well as marvel movies? I would like the person who picks this topic up to discover first the differences between these two franchises, and then talk about how these differences play out into the Cinematic Universes.

    • You wrote: "Do DC movies simply not put enough jokes in them?" Maybe it's not just the presence/absence of jokes but rather the type of humor used? For me, there's definitely a streak of camp and self-awareness in many of the Marvel movies that is not present in the DC movies. – JamesBKelley 19 hours ago
      0
    6
    Locked

    Dark, Light, and Color in Tim Burton's films

    An examination of how color, light, and dark have been used in Tim Burton’s films to reflect the view points of his characters and the observance of the mundane vs the outrageous. Specifically looking at how Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children differs from many of of Tim Burton’s other films by providing more "grey" spaces that are neither colorful "dream worlds" nor colorless "realities". It would also be interesting to include an analysis of the film Edward Scissorhands and how the "normal"/suburban world is portrayed as the "dream world" through color reflecting Edwards viewpoint.

    • May I suggest adding Charlie and the Chocolate Factory to the article? Not only is the film bursting with color, it's simultaneously similar and different in theme to the other two. You could do the same with Alice in Wonderland. – Stephanie M. 2 weeks ago
      3
    Taken by IAmToast (PM) 3 days ago.
    5
    Locked

    The Effects of Iconic Roles on an Actor and His/Her Career

    Most actors play a plethora of roles in film and on television shows. Some actors though, are best remembered for one or two iconic roles, even after the film has been out for years or the show gets cancelled. Examples include Mary Kate and Ashley Olsen, best known for their portrayal of Michelle Tanner, Jaleel White (Steve Urkel), and Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter). More examples: Juliette Binoche (Vianne Rochet, Chocolat), Julie Andrews (Maria Rainer, Mary Poppins), and Leonardo DiCaprio (Jack Dawson).

    Does being associated with an iconic role help or hurt an actor’s career? Does it make a difference whether the actor was a child or adult at the time of the role (s) in question? Do viewers prefer that actors stay in iconic role "molds," or would they rather actors create new characters/avoid typecasting? Explore these and other questions, as well as any examples you might choose, to determine the positive and negative aspects of associating actors with very specific roles.

    • The best actors would tend to belittle any type of impact, I would say. Take my childhood idol Clint Eastwood: traded his spurs for a holster, plays good guy or bad guy with equal tact; and still going strong in politics of all things--makes it seem as just matter of dusting off the layers of script material and moving on to the next being thing (nothing to it). Not convinced? Then, there is Arnold Schwarzenegger: Mr. Universe, Mr. Titanium, and Mr. Dream Teacher; still turning heads in politics. Positive and negative in Hollywood, not these guys. – LFreire 2 weeks ago
      3
    • Yet another interesting topic suggestion from Stephanie. I suppose there are examples of iconic roles that have helped an actor's career and others that have hurt a career. Off the top of my head I could mention just how long Sean Connery took to shake off the '007' tag, as some people actually confused the actor with the role, but he has gone on to more interesting roles, even if he did revisit Bond in 'Never Say Never Again' (1983). Conversely there's the controversial 'unsimulated sex act' that Chloë Sevigny performed in 'The Brown Bunny' (2003), which she will no doubt be forever remembered for and appears to have damaged her standing as a serious actress. Remaining in an iconic role certainly helps with the bank balance, but doesn't stretch an actor in any way - the actor Adam Woodyatt, who plays the character, Ian Beale in the long running British soap 'Eastenders', lives a few miles away from me and is often seen around in his Maserati (No, I'm not envious!...Well, maybe a little). The locals all refer to him by his on-screen character name. However, for me, the best example of someone who has never let the grass grow under his feet is Sir Patrick Stewart - perhaps best known for Captain Jean-Luc Picard in 'Star Trek: The Next Generation', who has since returned to his Shakespearean roots with vigour as well as delivering one the best performances as Ebenezer Scrooge in the 1999 version of 'A Christmas Carol'. – Amyus 2 weeks ago
      2
    • I think being strongly associated with a role is probably harmful for an actor in terms of their future career prospects. It's difficult to be type-cast and if an actor is type-cast than I suspect it would be very displeasing for them to have to struggle to break into new roles and in new genres. That being said socially it's probably neat for them to be strongly associated with a type of character or genre which would be cool if it didn't also impact what casting agents and directors think of them. – LucianoTheWriter 2 weeks ago
      1
    Taken by LucianoTheWriter (PM) 2 weeks ago.
    4

    Teen Films as Sexual education

    This article could asses the ways teen films inform, it’s primarly teenage audience, about the social and emotional ways of dealing with sex. Given this is never addressed in the clinical and scientific approach schools take towards sexual education, its reasonable to assume that most people would understand the other elements of sexual education through alternative mediums. Teen films are a great example as they often focus around the sex quest for boys i.e. Superbad, the Inbetweeners movie, Sex Drive, American Pie etc. Its could be said these films often create a gender disparity in dealing with sex as there is barely any female representation aside from the, older and sexually intimidating character

    • This is an interesting topic as it would be worth looking at the impact also of the genre of the film on the presentation of sex in such films. For instance the role in comedy is often to amuse and this can be used to soften the awkwardness of such sexual encounters and exploration. However, some of this does also normalise and champion the pursuit of sex as a rite of passage, which can send a negative portrayal of sex. The presence of sex in horror films is perhaps one of the most disturbing as often there are undertones of rape, force and abuse, 'Cherry Falls' is a concerning one. Then the issue of teen romance films can both have a positive and negative portrayal of sexual relations, 'Girl Next Door' and '100 Girls' are two interesting and frank films that deal with unusual portrayals of the emotional connection related to sex. I think this could be an intriguing topic to discuss. – SaraiMW 3 weeks ago
      2
    • I would add that there could also be strong critique involved. The teen dramas also facilitate an idealization of sexual engagement and often promote problematic images of women. – Jonathan Judd 3 weeks ago
      3
    • YES! I'd be interested to know how newer films tackle this idea, too. – Emily Esten 3 weeks ago
      2