Nature

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Evil plants

Numerous stories have featured plants in the role of villains. These plants range from minor nuisances (like the mandrakes in Harry Potter) to central antagonists (as in the musical Little Shop of Horrors). Why are people so fascinated by the idea of plants as villains? What are some examples of real-life dangerous plants? Are there any particular real-life plants that seem to get used as models for evil plants more often, and if so, why?

  • Maybe people get tired of pruning and they start blaming plants for their health problems? Or maybe get traumatized by them? The Venus fly-trap and poison ivy are used a lot (from what I've seen). Interesting topic. – OkaNaimo0819 11 months ago
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  • I think to explore this as a use of flora in science-fiction and fantasy would be thought provoking considering the ongoing discussions surrounding climate change. Some of these stories have evolved from the "plants taking earth back" perspective and could be viewed as the motive. Others, in the case of The Last Of Us and the Cordyceps, are more of an inspirational note where ideas from nature have informed designs and creative solutions – CAntonyBaker 11 months ago
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Nature Writing

Writing about nature is an interesting way to go about creative nonfiction. Nature writing forces a writer out of their comfort zone and requires them to have a personal interaction with the world around them. Some nature writers travel for months at a time following a flock of birds, living in a wooded area, or experiencing different climates, all while taking notes and collecting research. What impact does this interaction with nature have on the writer? How does this help the writer grow? What are the limits of nature writing? Nature is an interesting topic in the field of writing that should be explored and discovered.

  • That's totally agree on. Bella Wick. Nature can be fascinating in oh so many ways. – WSSfan 1 year ago
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  • I couldn't agree with you more, Bella Wick. I'd like to recommend a particularly interesting book, Wildwood: A Journey Through Trees, by Roger Deakin (2007. Penguin Books. ISBN 9780141010014). Quoting from the back cover 'Roger Deakin's unmatched exploration of our relationship with trees is autobiography, history, traveller's tale and incisive work of natural history. It will take you into the heart of the woods, where we go to grown and learn'. Especially apt in a time when trees are being felled to make way for 5G. – Amyus 1 year ago
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  • I find this take very interesting Bella. I also think writing in nature also allows for the persons inner creativity shine through, it allows for their interpretation of what they are perceiving, all the while giving the reader the opportunity to step into the writers words and visualize and feel what they are seeing. You look at the great western writers such as Thoreau, and Muir, who steeped themselves in nature for an extensive period of time, they were able to get closer to the earth, a deep connection, and the actualization that they are a part of this beautiful spinning rock in the cosmos. I am so stoked for you to explore this topic if you do choose to do so! – thomasgoenczi 1 year ago
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  • You can't write about a penguin if you don't see it, you have to experience it yourself. – otohoanglong 1 year ago
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  • This is definitely an interesting topic. Recently, I had watched a small documentary about the importance of nature and the psychological impact this has on astronauts. Astronauts spend months in space and psychologists needed to take into account how much they miss earth as whole. The life and creation on earth as a whole is what they miss. Nature writing I think would definitely help with the mentality of these astronauts who spend months up in space with no interaction with simple things that we take for granted such as trees, animals and rivers. Perhaps, nature writing and taking pictures of nature could help them feel more at home? – JAbida 1 year ago
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