LC Morisset

LC Morisset

A book, TV, and movie lover who routinely overanalyzes things to people who did not ask for it. Sparing my Facebook friends my opinions by posting them here

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    Latest Topics

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    Superheroes on Screen: Entertainment or Escapism?

    Superman arose in comics in the aftermath of The Great Depression. Captain America was designed to fight Hitler. The X-Men were a brilliant allegory to the Civil Rights Movement. Comic book superheroes were created or rose in prominence when readers saw them fighting their enemies or representing and overcoming their struggles. Although the last 10 years haven’t featured any crises of that scale, superheroes have dominated our media. Has the stigma of comic books simply elapsed and everyone can be a nerd in the mainstream or does the rise of superhero media indicative of a country looking to be distracted?

    • i don't understand this topic. how is entertainment different from escapism? which represents the way that comics can operate as allegorical or literal consideration of big issues? why does the topic's author claim "the last 10 years haven’t featured any crises of that scale"? how about the global financial crisis / the great recession? how is the rising acceptability of comic books/nerd culture opposed to a society "looking to be distracted"? and again, if the two are indeed in opposition, which is "entertainment" and which is "escapism"? it seems the whole topic is premised on a false dichotomy and an irrelevant preamble. – Richard Marcil 4 months ago
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    • I would examine the superheroes & see what aspects of society they represent and check to see how they have transformed in pop culture over the years – BMartin43 4 months ago
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    • I like the idea you have going. I wouldn't say that the last 10 years haven't featured any crises on that scale though. – Bfitts 4 months ago
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    • It's an interesting idea you have going, but I think you should explain your theory more, – shazia 3 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    LC Morisset

    I got into the cosplaying scene fairly recently and this was such a good read. I’d always been obsessed with Halloween and went a little overboard and ended up a bit disappointed when everyone else at the college party was dressed like a sexy cat or football player (not that there’s anything wrong with that).I went to Comic Con in San Diego last year for the first time and being surrounded by people who had clearly put so much time and effort into their costumes was inspiring. I cosplayed as the Winter Soldier and was fairly nervous for my first time and didn’t think it looked very good but everyone was incredibly nice. People in cosplays I thought were leagues above my own would stop me to tell me how cool I looked. It is a very open and inviting community and I would definitely recommend everyone try it at least once.

    An Overview of Cosplay: Exploring the Subculture
    LC Morisset

    Toys as art is a very intriguing topic but I felt as though the delivery could have been significantly streamlined. Your introductory paragraph is very aggressive and makes it fairly confusing if the issue of gendered toys is the issue you’re discussing or if you’re dismissing other people’s concern. Your actual thesis statement didn’t come until around the 13th paragraph which at that point made all the previous ones feel wholly unnecessary. And when you finally focused on Barbie and Lego, you only wrote about four paragraphs summarizing the rich history and originality you claim these toys have in the previous paragraph. And then you return to speaking about how they are gendered. If your argument is that gendering toys doesn’t matter because most of the time children prefer the toy that ‘corresponds’ to their gender, you don’t need to keep repeating it because you have good support in the findings of your cited psychologists. Say it once and be done so it doesn’t feel so much like I, the reader, am being scolded for something. Instead I would have loved to maybe get a history of toy making, benefits of playing with toys since you brought in psychology, and how toys have changed over time.

    Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO
    LC Morisset

    I think one of the biggest positives of interconnected movie universes is it’s TV-esque quality. It gives characters a chance to develop not only individually but in their relationships to each other. Using the Marvel example, we’ve seen the relationship between the Avengers change and become more complex. From a thrown together group of heroes in the first Avengers to clear friends in Avengers 2 (best exemplified by the party scene) and ending in a heart wrenching tearing apart in Civil War. Yet mere sequels couldn’t have accomplished this because the relationships of the group depended so strongly on the motivations of the individual established in the solo movies. Civil War’s titular battle wouldn’t have happened if Steve Rogers hadn’t been so disillusioned with the government by the events of the Winter Soldier; he likely would’ve had little issue with working closely with government officials.
    The Marvel Netflix shows share the same redeeming qualities but stand out in their quality of villains. The solo series’ have all given their villains time to be fleshed out which make their final battles all the more intriguing. While the MCU has struggled in the villains department, in Infinity War, we’re going to have a villain that’s been building up over multiple movies which will increase our engagement with him.

    The Pros and Cons Of Developing A Cinematic Universe
    LC Morisset

    Bojack Horseman is such an incredible show that’s been nearly impossible for me to explain without making it sound utterly ridiculous or like the most depressing thing on earth, so I applaud you for explaining it so well. My only problem with the show has been the amount of people willing to put up with Bojack’s destructive behavior. Although the show presents a fairly realistic depiction of depression and substance abuse, it seemed to me that the damage Bojack has inflicted on the lives of everyone around him was always overlooked. With the example of Todd brushing off Bojack’s sabotage of his rock opera, I thought that was a little unfair to Todd as a character. The sabotage was supposed to show us how Bojack really depends on Todd or any other kind of social contact, but in the process just showed that Bojack is benefiting from others whilst actively ruining their quality of life. Because Todd is so passive, I think it would have been even more powerful to have him stand up for himself and make Bojack see the consequences of his actions.
    In terms of dark comedy in general, I just wanted to make a comparison to the new Amazon show “Fleabag”. I think this is the only show, other than Bojack Horseman, where after I’m done laughing it leaves me sitting for a minute and contemplating what just happened and what it says about the characters. The eponymous fleabag isn’t as outwardly destructive (or mean) as Bojack, but in the 6 episode run we see all her little ticks and quirks snowball into a pattern of unhealthy behaviors. Unlike Bojack, the show ends on the darker note and leaves that for the audience to stew in until the next season. Fleabag follows a different progression than Bojack, rolling towards the darkness rather than a continuous undertone, yet it is equally deft with it’s handling of dark comedy. If you don’t laugh, you’ll cry.

    Bojack Horseman: Balancing Humor and Dark Themes
    LC Morisset

    I thought this was an interesting take on the progression of “masculine” qualities in Disney princesses over time. Specifically in regards to Mulan, I thought the point that pretending to be a man is what helped lead her to accept her womanhood more was very insightful. However you used the example of Mulan’s plan to bury the Huns in the avalanche as an example of her “masculine” traits of recklessness and bravery when it was the exact opposite. Although the fight did get her termed “the bravest of them all” by her fellow soldiers, it was actually a very calculated move that exemplified one of Mulan’s more underrated traits, her cleverness and knack for strategy. Mulan realized the one remaining missile wouldn’t do significant damage to Shan Yu’s army, so she ignored all the people yelling and shot it towards the mountain and burying the thousands in the rapidly approaching horde. All though the most obvious example, Mulan’s cleverness is what actually caused her to succeed in the situations her bravery put her in and it’s on display from the very beginning of the movie. When she’s late to get ready for the matchmaker she rigs a device so her dog can feed the chickens, while being dragged through her makeover she stops, analyzes, and wins a chess game between to older men sitting in the street, and finally figures out how to use the two weights to climb the pole in the training camp and retrieve the arrow. Had she not been able to think creatively,her bravery would’ve been for little since she would have been sent home during training. Although intelligence is obviously not gendered, there’s still the implication that being female is what lead her to think around problems differently than all the other characters. While the other soldiers, and especially Shang, try to solve problems in a very direct and more “masculine” fashion, Mulan considers every possible angle. When Shan Yu makes it into the Emperor’s mansion, the soldiers attempt to make a battering ram which proves mostly ineffective. In a fairly obvious metaphor, simply hitting the problem didn’t solve it. Instead Mulan, the lone female, thinks of using the columns around the house to gain access. The more “feminine” trait of flexibility leads to her greater success as a strategist. Mulan for a long time was the pinnacle of the “masculine princess” yet it’s her feminine traits that save her live throughout the film and lead to her eventual victory.

    Masculinity and the Disney Princess
    LC Morisset

    One major problem with the question of superhero franchises ending is the definition of “franchise”. Superman and Batman movies have been coming out in spurts for decades, one actor is retired and another puts on the costume and fills the same role. But unlike Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings, comics don’t actually have an endpoint. They have hundreds of character each with their own personal history, villains, team ups and relationships. There isn’t a chosen one who defeats the big bad at the end of the last book and then everyone moves on with their respective lives. If anything Superhero films are most similar to Bond films or Doctor Who series, the only real limit on the story is the imagination of the writers.

    However, my issue with the definition of franchise is in this relatively new concept of the “cinematic universe”. For example, every generation has “their” Batman, be it Adam West, Michael Keaton or Christian Bale or any other person their partial to (maybe Clooney does it for you, it’s subjective). But in those instances, the actor did a couple movies, that specific universe ended and than a new one began headed by someone else as though it was the first time ever attempted. But in this shared universe, the story never ends. With the example of Hugh Jackman retiring the claws in Logan this year, he’s leaving but”Wolverine” is not. With the introduction of X-23, a young movie viewer now may grow up with a completely different face on Wolverine but who is still technically part of the same continuity. Robert Downey Jr. can’t play Iron Man forever but it’s possible Riri Williams as Ironheart could be brought to the the big screen. I’m not speaking in the area of should, but it is theoretically possible for there to be an entirely different set of Avengers 15 years from now that are still part of the sprawling MCU. Nobody wants to see Paul Bettany painted purple as the Vision 20 years from now (and I’m including Paul Bettany in that), but if the movie universe was as constantly changing and complex as the comics have been over more than 70 years- I don’t see why the franchise couldn’t go on until audiences simply refuse to see another one.

    Should Superhero Franchises have a Definite Ending