LC Morisset

LC Morisset

A book, TV, and movie lover who routinely overanalyzes things to people who did not ask for it. Sparing my Facebook friends my opinions by posting them here

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    Latest Articles

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    Superheroes on Screen: Entertainment or Escapism?

    Superman arose in comics in the aftermath of The Great Depression. Captain America was designed to fight Hitler. The X-Men were a brilliant allegory to the Civil Rights Movement. Comic book superheroes were created or rose in prominence when readers saw them fighting their enemies or representing and overcoming their struggles. Although the last 10 years haven’t featured any crises of that scale, superheroes have dominated our media. Has the stigma of comic books simply elapsed and everyone can be a nerd in the mainstream or does the rise of superhero media indicative of a country looking to be distracted?

    • i don't understand this topic. how is entertainment different from escapism? which represents the way that comics can operate as allegorical or literal consideration of big issues? why does the topic's author claim "the last 10 years haven’t featured any crises of that scale"? how about the global financial crisis / the great recession? how is the rising acceptability of comic books/nerd culture opposed to a society "looking to be distracted"? and again, if the two are indeed in opposition, which is "entertainment" and which is "escapism"? it seems the whole topic is premised on a false dichotomy and an irrelevant preamble. – Richard Marcil 8 months ago
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    • I would examine the superheroes & see what aspects of society they represent and check to see how they have transformed in pop culture over the years – BMartin43 8 months ago
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    • I like the idea you have going. I wouldn't say that the last 10 years haven't featured any crises on that scale though. – Bfitts 8 months ago
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    • It's an interesting idea you have going, but I think you should explain your theory more, – shazia 8 months ago
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    Latest Comments

    LC Morisset

    If anything, they’d probably have Bucky in a solo Black Widow movie considering their comic history

    Why Steve Rogers Should Die in Avengers: Infinity War
    LC Morisset

    I think we all share the same concerns about that. Infinity War is being written by Markus and McFeely who wrote Civil War and I think they managed a solid balance so I have a bit of faith on that front. I’m pretty sure though that the people with the most screen time will probably be Tony Stark, Stephen Strange, Peter Quill and possibly Thanos. (Which I’m not thrilled about to be quite honest and I’d love to be proven wrong)

    Why Steve Rogers Should Die in Avengers: Infinity War
    LC Morisset

    They’re not movies but while reading this I immediately thought of two show that I think superbly used sex as a means of art or narrative progression rather than simple titillation. Diary of a Call Girl used sex to show how Hannah views her job and the show actually had an episodic nature wherein Hannah attempts to find the best way to fulfill her client’s needs. The sex is very present but it’s secondary to the mental connection she builds with clients and also the walls Hannah builds between her personal and professional life.

    And in Netflix’s Sense8 there are minutes long orgy scene but they’re used to demonstrate the telepathic connection of the main characters and also introduce the concept of fluid sexuality.

    Sex in Cinema: Poetry vs. Pornography (Explicit Content)
    LC Morisset

    I’ll be the first to admit I’m not the biggest fan of the Flash (I stopped watching after Season 1) but I think this perfectly exemplifies the appeal of the show for some people. It’s unrepentantly silly and embraces the wackiness in ways almost no other supershows are doing aside from maybe Supergirl. (And I may not be a fan but I do think Captain Cold is vastly superior to most of the other speedster villains. At the very least he’s had more of an arc and solid motivations)

    "The Flash" as the Modern Equivalent of 1960's "Batman"
    LC Morisset

    He did say that,however recently he also stated that his appearance in Avengers 4 will “wrap everything up”. His contract was slated to end in Infinity War and due to his renewed excitement he did extend it to include at least one more movie. However, my article is my opinion on what character deaths I think would provide the most narrative progression combined with probability of their deaths. And I feel that Cap dying in Infinity War would have a lot more impact going into the next film and feel a bit less traumatic than many of the original avengers dying/retiring en masse at the end of Avengers 4 (another popular theory)

    Why Steve Rogers Should Die in Avengers: Infinity War
    LC Morisset

    I got into the cosplaying scene fairly recently and this was such a good read. I’d always been obsessed with Halloween and went a little overboard and ended up a bit disappointed when everyone else at the college party was dressed like a sexy cat or football player (not that there’s anything wrong with that).I went to Comic Con in San Diego last year for the first time and being surrounded by people who had clearly put so much time and effort into their costumes was inspiring. I cosplayed as the Winter Soldier and was fairly nervous for my first time and didn’t think it looked very good but everyone was incredibly nice. People in cosplays I thought were leagues above my own would stop me to tell me how cool I looked. It is a very open and inviting community and I would definitely recommend everyone try it at least once.

    An Overview of Cosplay: Exploring the Subculture
    LC Morisset

    Toys as art is a very intriguing topic but I felt as though the delivery could have been significantly streamlined. Your introductory paragraph is very aggressive and makes it fairly confusing if the issue of gendered toys is the issue you’re discussing or if you’re dismissing other people’s concern. Your actual thesis statement didn’t come until around the 13th paragraph which at that point made all the previous ones feel wholly unnecessary. And when you finally focused on Barbie and Lego, you only wrote about four paragraphs summarizing the rich history and originality you claim these toys have in the previous paragraph. And then you return to speaking about how they are gendered. If your argument is that gendering toys doesn’t matter because most of the time children prefer the toy that ‘corresponds’ to their gender, you don’t need to keep repeating it because you have good support in the findings of your cited psychologists. Say it once and be done so it doesn’t feel so much like I, the reader, am being scolded for something. Instead I would have loved to maybe get a history of toy making, benefits of playing with toys since you brought in psychology, and how toys have changed over time.

    Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO
    LC Morisset

    I think one of the biggest positives of interconnected movie universes is it’s TV-esque quality. It gives characters a chance to develop not only individually but in their relationships to each other. Using the Marvel example, we’ve seen the relationship between the Avengers change and become more complex. From a thrown together group of heroes in the first Avengers to clear friends in Avengers 2 (best exemplified by the party scene) and ending in a heart wrenching tearing apart in Civil War. Yet mere sequels couldn’t have accomplished this because the relationships of the group depended so strongly on the motivations of the individual established in the solo movies. Civil War’s titular battle wouldn’t have happened if Steve Rogers hadn’t been so disillusioned with the government by the events of the Winter Soldier; he likely would’ve had little issue with working closely with government officials.
    The Marvel Netflix shows share the same redeeming qualities but stand out in their quality of villains. The solo series’ have all given their villains time to be fleshed out which make their final battles all the more intriguing. While the MCU has struggled in the villains department, in Infinity War, we’re going to have a villain that’s been building up over multiple movies which will increase our engagement with him.

    The Pros and Cons Of Developing A Cinematic Universe