aserraglio

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Why Are "True Story Movies" a Current Trend?

    In the past several years, we’ve seen the production of movies such as "Hidden Figures", "Hacksaw Ridge", and "Dunkirk", just to name a few. All of these movies have the fact that they were based on a true story in common. These are only a few of such movies, with easily a dozen others having come out within the past decade, or even less, within the past five or so years. What is it about these "true story style movies" that has made them so incredibly popular within the past ten years? What aspect of society does their popularity stem from? Is it just filmmakers trying to come up with viable movie ideas, or is there a deeper societal meaning that contributes to their success?

    • This sounds like a compelling topic! I was once told by someone that movies often reflect the ideologies and beliefs of the society at that point in time. For example, films in the late 80's and 90's were all about a dystopian future which reflected societies worries about technology. Similarly, biographical movies have certainly seen an uplift but it might benefit you to think about the common themes which are shared by all of these movies. – simonmalik 1 year ago
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    • Something possibly worth exploring in this proposal is the inherent artificial nature of adapting stories for an audience. As Picasso is credited with saying, “Art is a lie that helps us realize the truth.” With this vein, it may prove helpful for the topic to delve into how these “true story” pictures stretch their own basis in truth. Nonetheless, an interesting idea to nurture! – jgpolk 1 year ago
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    • It's because people are curious about history, and enjoy seeing "True Story Movies", even though the trueness of the story or stories in question can be stretched and/or twisted to the point of exaggeration. – WSSfan 1 year ago
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    • Adding to what has already been mentioned by commenters above, 'truth' is obviously subjective and one of the problems with 'true story' or 'based on a true story' films is discerning the agenda behind them. Whose truth are we seeing? In a time when alternative news is under attack, frequently labelled as fake news (or worse) and even words are being weaponised to drive home official narratives, it's more important than ever to be a critical thinker and make up one's own mind. We've recently had the 6th of June D-Day commemorations and I was reminded of when, in 1994, I accompanied my (then) girlfriend to France as she was covering that year's commemorations for her newspaper. Once the official services were over, we met some fascinating old men and women - French, German, British, American, in fact so many nationalities it would take a long time to list them all. I heard some truly moving stories, not just acts of bravery in the face of fire, but also heartwarming tales of empathy and compassion from those who saw past the horror and went to the aid of the 'enemy'; saving lives and, in the process, making life long friends. There I was, sitting amongst soldiers, airmen, resistance fighters etc, and realising that these real 'true' stories might never be heard, let alone made into films. – Amyus 1 year ago
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    Latest Comments

    I had never thought of fairy tales being sensationalized before, so thank you for bringing this to light! I personally tend to separate “fairy tales” like Disney movies and other such things from their original, darker versions like what the Brothers Grimm actually compiled and wrote. The new versions have been changed so much that I almost count them as completely different stories with very little in common with the original other than the inspiring topic.

    The Formidable Fairy Tale: A Writer's Guide

    This article is fascinating to me, as someone who upon first entering the digital world hated the very thought of using textspeak in any scenario. I have now come to realize many of the things presented within this article, and I would completely agree with the idea that textspeak is almost a separate dialect of written English entirely. It takes skill to be able to interpret this textspeak, and so many people write it off as laziness. It reminds me of the book series Chaos Walking by Patrick Ness, where the books are written linguistically according to the point of view of the narrator. For the main character Todd, it’s written using poor grammar and spelling, as though the uneducated boy himself was writing it, whereas with female lead Viola, with a better education, the language is more clear, with the two coming closer together as they each change each other throughout the series. It’s amazing what using these intricacies of language can do to a story or even just a daily conversation.

    Creative Texting: Writing and Textspeak

    This essay speaks to me as a writer on a number of levels, but the main one is from the section titled “What’s Your Backup Plan?” This is particularly poignant to me, as I have had that response directed to me nearly every time I tell someone that I want to write. What most people don’t realize, that I think this article touches on briefly, is that without creativity, those cold hard “facts” of life would not be here. Mathematical equations may be based on certainties, but they would not have been thought of without someone being inventive and creative enough to make previously un-thought of combinations. It’s amazing how so many people ignore the creative aspects of “realistic” jobs. Thanks for drawing attention to this!

    Creative Writing is the Sincerest Form of Reality