Bribbleisfreeble

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    In what ways do Marvel's depictions of females affect society and real women?

    When considering how women are viewed in film, I like to think of the Bechdel test. This test (and I am paraphrasing here) says that if a movie does not have two female characters in it that talk about something other than a man, then it fails. Unfortunately, not all of Marvel’s movies pass. How do these depictions of women (ie, their lack of roles that include interactions with other women, the way that only men are discussed when interactions do occur, etc) affect real live ladies? How does it affect society? How does it support the systematic oppression of women and perpetrate the patriarchy?

    • I agree that Marvel fails it's female characters, and women, as a whole with it's representation of women.It rarely treats women badly, and ocasionally has some really good female characters (see; Black Panther). But it's just in sheer numbers and representation that it fails its women. For every 4-5 men there is one notable female character. (See Avengers and Guardians of the Galaxy). It fails to show women do much of anything as a whole, as even the supporting female characters, are delegated to just being "the girlfriends." And even the superhero women eventually become someone's girlfriend. Women cannot exist long in the marvel universe without being attached to a boyfriend or love interest. That si where Marvel fails most. There are hardly any women in the movies as headliners, and even when they are they are put into usually forced relationships. It's a shame. – Dimitri 2 years ago
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    • I have found majority of films that aren't targeted specifically to the female demographic fail the Bechdel test. I think it would be interesting to focus on how a lot of people criticise the test, without realising that if it is normal and common for men to have discussions not around the opposite sex, then it should be normal for women as well. – Zohal99 2 years ago
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    • You could contrast this with how the DC has tried to target more towards women (and POC but that's not the main focus here) especially with a movie like Wonder Women that featured a largely all female cast and a female director. Her character also eventually exists without the male hero and can exist without him. – Pamela Maria 2 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    I think that it is interesting and important to investigate the evil stepmother trope that prevails in most fairytales a little more closely. In relation to the death of the mother (one subtle way of the reader/viewer to be told that only the main character is the only female that matters), it insists that nothing would be better if you can’t have the original. However, that original is stripped from the story, leaving us feeling as lost as the main character. I believe that this is one way to limit the amount of female characters displayed in stories. It also takes away any chance of depicting a healthy mother-daughter relationship.

    Missing Moms and the Fairytale Characters Living Without Them

    The importance of dystopian novels are definitely to help readers wake up and open their eyes to situations around them. The effect that they can have on a society is rather incredible–especially when a book or movie becomes popular. However, I do not think that this is a new genre. Books and movies discussing topics such as these have been around since at least the 1920s.

    What is the Purpose of Dystopian Literature?

    I think that the CEO’s comment at the end of this video really rubs me the wrong way. Wojcicki seems to be implying that Paul’s videos–possibly including the one bring discussed–might not be tasteless to everyone. The amount of disrespect that video displayed was atrocious and I don’t believe that I have heard anyone have a good argument defending it. To imply that it was merely “tasteless” is both infuriating and vexing.

    For Logan Paul and Others, What Happens Online Doesn't Stay Online