EarlGreyTRex

EarlGreyTRex

Current Master's candidate studying History and Indigenous Treaty Rights. He is a member of a Northeast Native American Nation and currently works in his tribal government.

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    Latest Topics

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    The historical influences in the creation of RPG worlds

    I am an avid Elder Scrolls fan and a history student. Recently I noticed some similarities between the fictional gods in the story line and the depictions of ancient gods in historical texts. For example, Molag Bal in TES is based on the horned god of the ancient Canaanite people. The same god the Hebrews worshiped underneath Mt Sinai with the golden calf, and the same god Moses destroys when he descends the mountain. So when players kill Molag Bal in the video game, they are fighting the same battle Moses fought in the Old Testament! How cool is that?

    I’m willing to bet little nuggets of historical information have been hidden in countless RPGs and I think it would be a really cool topic for an article.

    • This would take a lot of research but it sounds so cool! You could take a look at the mythological structure of some of the theologies in these games and see which mythologies they are based off of. – LaRose 4 years ago
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    • It wouldn't have to just be limited to theologies; most game lore can be read like a history book. I'm sure there are a lot of ties to actual historical events as well. – GameGoose 4 years ago
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    • I am positive that TES interpret true historical events just as other RPG games. For example, Assassin's Creed and Fallout 3 (about slavery). In addition to your example. you could go a bit further and discuss how Elder Scrolls reflects Norse mythology. For instance, the northern lights, the scenery is equivalent to that of Northern Europe (specifically Sweden and Norway), and they use Northern names in the game. So just some suggestions there, but I like where this is going! I hope this transpires into an article. I'd love to read it. – breeyabrown 4 years ago
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    A look at how Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them, fits into American History and Native American culture

    There has been a lot of debate over the newest installment in the Harry Potter series, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, particularly from the Native American community. This is shocking to a lot of people, mainly the hardcore Harry Potter fandom who eagerly await the movie. Most fans are unsure whether this dissent from the Native American community is valid. A well-written article should address both sides of the argument and clearly lay out the issue.

    Rowling recently released the house mascots of her new American Wizarding school. These mascots are based off of mythological animals in Native American culture. They are: The Horned Serpent, The Thunderbird, The Wampus and the Pukwudgie. These ‘fantastic beasts’ are steeped in traditional Native oral histories and I think it could be fun to delve into their stories and examine what they mean to Native culture.

    • This seems like a very interesting topic. As an aid Harry Potter fan myself, I would absolutely love to take this article up. But, I think I'd hold off until I've actually watched the movie. In my opinion, this is much better written once the movie has entered the cinematic world and the official Harry Potter canon. If, by that time, this topic is still open, I'll be back. – Adnan Bey 4 years ago
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    • I agree with the above. When we've seen what place and role the 'beasts' have in the film, then there'll be much more to discuss and chew over. – J.P. Shiel 4 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    EarlGreyTRex

    You bring up some great points, but I’m not sure I agree with how you determine the worth of these movies. Not all movies are made to appeal to the most people possible. And the fact that they didn’t make a big blockbuster splash or win a lot of awards doesn’t determine a movies worth. I love history. I always been enthralled by stories of the past and I don’t mind dull things. Exhaustive detail on some mundane aspect of another’s life can be genuinely interesting. And yes, I know that’s an unpopular opinion, but I sure hope boring biopics don’t stop getting made. I love that stuff.

    The New Wave of Biopics
    EarlGreyTRex

    This was really interesting. Thanks! I loved Inside Out. I saw it with a gaggle of pre-teens I was supervising for a summer camp, but I probably enjoyed more than any of them. The relationship with emotions we all face is real and the personification of which can resonate with anyone in any time period. That’s the beauty of it!

    Inside Out and St. Thomas Aquinas' Philosophy of the Emotions
    EarlGreyTRex

    To This Day by Shane Koyczan changed my life! I was pumped to see it on this list. For most of my life, I’ve been less than interested in poetry. I guess it was a little too vague for me. But in To This Day, I saw something new and exciting. I was wrapped around every word like I was in the climax of an amazing speech or the depths of a good story.
    Story-telling is important in my culture. It’s how we explain everything from our religion to our histories. This is an amazing way to tell a story and I’m excited to see animated poetry grow.

    Animated Poetry: A Starting Point