itsverity

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

Junior Contributor I

  • Articles
    0
  • Featured
    0
  • Comments
    3
  • Ext. Comments
    3
  • Processed
    0
  • Revisions
    0
  • Topics
    1
  • Topics Taken
    2
  • Notes
    4
  • Topics Proc.
    1
  • Topics Rev.
    1
  • Points
    101
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    50
    Sorry, no posts matched your criteria.

    Latest Topics

    4
    Locked

    Marvel Cinematic Universe: How much is too much?

    The Marvel Cinematic Universe is complex and fascinating, and like many fans, I love the crossovers among the films. However, with the addition of several TV series (Daredevil, Agents of S.H.E.I.L.D., etc.), it seems nearly impossible to keep up with the intricacies of the world. With more TV content on the horizon for Marvel, I wonder if the platform is too much. It’s confusing for new watchers to fully understand the overall plot without having seen previous Marvel films. I think the argument can go both ways. On one hand, the multimedia platform is exciting and facilitates depth. On the other hand, is there a point when it will all be too much?

    • This is a very interesting point that you have brought up. With solo films for Black Panther, The Wasp and many other superheroes coming up too, it has become next to impossible to keep track of all the stories. One can also contrast the current times where a superhero film is released every 6 months and series like Luke Cage, Jessica Jones on Netflix ensure that we have stuff to watch all year round with say, a decade earlier when people used to have to wait for a couple of years to get a Batman or Spiderman movie. – Vishnu Unnithan 5 months ago
      4
    • Is it possible that the constantly growing scale of the MCU won't necessarily kill it but force it to become more and more niche? A casual viewer may reach the point of superhero fatigue or throw up their hands and say "I can't keep up with this anymore", but the more hardcore comic book fans who've kept abreast of decades of comic book history as well as all the multi-verses, galaxies, and timelines would theoretically still support these stories coming to life in all forms (as long as they maintained their level of quality). – LC Morisset 5 months ago
      2
    • You can never have too much Marvel. Just like you can't have too much ice cream. – Munjeera 5 months ago
      0
    • Both are good arguments but to me that whether it is too much or not, people are and will still watch these Marvel shows and movies. It's interesting that maybe on some level these points to bridge the gap between the amount of consumption of watching these shows and imagining ourselves in the world of the superheroes. – daisy 1 month ago
      0
    • The market has definitely been flooded. They don't seem to hold the same weight they once did. It would be interesting to see if its because we are spoiled for choice, or is it a case of Disney choosing quantity over quality? Either way, I hope we stick to one Star Wars a year, Disney; any more would be overkill. – AGMacdonald 1 month ago
      0
    • I think we can see the stretch sometimes with Agents of Shield fumbling to connect but not spoil the Marvel movies that happen during its seasons, and Netflix's shows trying to ignore The Avengers (and, soon, Spider-man) in New York. – IndiLeigh 1 month ago
      0
    Taken by AGMacdonald (PM) 1 month ago.

    Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

    Latest Comments

    I liked all of the comparisons you made. I read the book long before I saw the film, so there were a couple of things you mentioned that I had forgotten about. I want to mention the first comparison you made because that stood out to me as well. I agree that the sexual assault subplot added so much to Lou’s character. It really struck me in the book and I felt like I understood her so much better. But how could the movie have done that justice? Like you said, film directors must choose which details to keep and which ones to omit often based on a limited time frame. Because the main storyline was Will and Louisa’s love, there was much less time to devote to other details. Had the directors wanted to keep the sexual assault subplot, they would have to address it fairly quickly. And because it is such a rich and painful section of the novel, I don’t think they could have incorporated all of that into a short amount of time. I like to think that rather than trying to rush such an important moment, the directors chose to omit the detail because the couldn’t give it the attention it deserves.

    Me Before You: How the Movie Changed the Story

    But is this type of writing really “dumbing down” the minds of young people? What Mariel argues is that textspeak actually involves a rather complex process. Sure, textspeak is sometimes used as a shortcut and misses that process, but not in all cases.

    Creative Texting: Writing and Textspeak

    Great article! The value of toys isn’t what they are labeled as, but what children do with them. Children do have natural inclinations toward specific toys. The dichotomy becomes problematic when children who don’t express that inclination are told to go play with something that is “suited” to them.

    Toys Will Be Toys: Barbie vs. LEGO