superdilettante

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Latest Topics

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    The message that George RR Martin is trying to send with Game of Thrones

    Analyze and discuss what greater meaning there is in Game of Thrones, an overarching message that Martin is trying to send to his readers (and viewers I guess) beyond the amazing fantasy, political intrigue, and gut-wrenching battles and deaths that has enraptured most of the fan base.

    • An interesting idea for a topic, especially since Hillary Clinton appears to identify with the Cersei Lannister/Baratheon character. Real life copying art? – Amyus 2 months ago
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    • Something can be said for the unabashed yet tactical killing off of characters in the series, and what relevance this has in contemporary television's trends in dependency on viewer/fan preferences/reactions. – LNwenwu 2 months ago
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    • I think it would also be helpful to analyze, or critique, i would say, his methods for promoting messages. The amount of gross sexual content in the series, for instance...is this fanservice? Necessary to the plot? What are his ways of getting his views across to others? – EricJohnson 2 months ago
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    • Is there truly an overall message that Martin is trying to send though? I personally don't believe it's that complicated. Just Westeros vs the dead with Martin just trying to make a buck off his creative and intelligent fantasy writing style. – EsportsJosh 2 months ago
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    • While I'm not sure there's a coherent "message" to be found within Game of Thrones, I do think it's been noted before how much GOT/ASOIAF deconstruct certain tropes of fantasy. The traditional good v. evil battle is muddied constantly throughout the series, and there's a quote by George RR Martin saying "the true horrors of human history derive not from orcs and Dark Lords, but from ourselves," which brings up GOT's emphasis on its characters largely being responsible for their actions, and the consequences that arise from them. – LucasLacamara 1 month ago
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    Latest Comments

    This is probably the most thorough analysis of what Hamilton stands for I have read. You hit it right on the nail. This musical has encouraged a lot more people (including me) to seek a more nuanced understanding of our country’s history. I’m watching a showing in Chicago in 2 months. I really hope the cast is good!

    Hamilton and the Construction of Post-Obama Americanism

    This is probably the most thorough analysis of what Hamilton stands for. You hit it right on the nail. This musical has encouraged a lot more people (including me) to seek a more nuanced understanding of our country’s history. I’m watching a showing in Chicago in 2 months. I really hope the cast is good!

    Hamilton and the Construction of Post-Obama Americanism

    I recently rewatched all of Legend of Korra and soon after found this article. The amount of research and analysis put into your piece is really impressive. I think your analysis of the villains and their role in Korra’s growth is spot on. It also fits very nicely into what the storytellers frame the Avatar as–a figure that brings balance to the world, whether it’s between benders and non-benders, people and spirits, or people and people.

    The Legend of Korra: Empathizing with Villains

    Awesome read! Another argument for the regular book is how the “tactile experience” as you describe it can sometimes enhance the reading experience. For example, as someone runs their fingers through the 800 pages of Alexandre Dumas’ The Count of Monte Christo, we’re experiencing it the same way his original readers would have, the way Dumas may have expected his audiences to experience it. The weight of the book acting as an extension of the weight of Dante’s vengeance on his psyche or the length of the book as an extension of the long-windedness of his oft harrowing journey. Some people even claim they just feel inexplicably more spiritually connected to stories on paper. I know for most it may seem insignificant, or even silly, and I used to think the same way, but I’ve grown to really appreciate the feeling of an actual book.

    Online vs Print: The Digital Age of Books