JKKN

JKKN

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

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Japanese VS. American Storytelling: What Each Does Better Than The Other

The title–which could seriously be reworked–kind of says it all. Despite the concept being somewhat shallow, it would be fairly interesting to see someone tackle this topic and go as in-depth as they can with it. Purely examining Japanese media–such as anime, cinema, television shows in general–and American media–cartoons, cinema, and, again, television shows in general–it appears that each culture brings something unique to the table. But what is that unique thing/things? Is one truly better than the other? And how do you define better? Clearer, more concise themes? More universality and acceptance by a broader audience? These are aspects of both entertainment cultures that could be seriously explored and exhausted in a well-written article.

  • I would love to learn more about this topic from someone who is knowledgeable. – Munjeera 5 years ago
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The Rise of LOLRANDOM HUMOR And What It Means For Creators And Consumers Alike

With the advent of not only the Internet, but content-creating parties based entirely in the web, a new type of humor has arisen: LOLRANDOM HUMOR. LOLRANDOM HUMOR, so aptly named by one of my friends, is oftentimes a blitzkrieg of images, sounds, non-sequitur tactics, and other various "wacky" items from the grab-bag of Internet Comedy. Examples of this kind of humor can be seen in Vines, popular YouTube Comedy Channels, and virtually any message board of the World Wide Web. With this kind of comedy becoming so prolific, what could it entail for the future of humor, at least in pop culture, as a whole? Is this brand of humor harmless, or could it be the marker of the end of what we know as comedy today? Analyze what this could do to both up-and-coming content creators and consumers alike, and discuss whether or not this kind of humor is destined to be a simple characteristic of contemporary culture that is sure to give way to something else, or if it’s around to stay for good.

  • Thug life videos! Those are hilarious. I don't think this "new" type of humor is going to get rid of the old type. I think people will still enjoy more formal types of comedy like standup. Also, I think a lot of those forms of comedy have existed, it's just that they haven't been widely available. For example, my friends and I have always done stupid things, said stupid things, put together funny things, but the difference is no one was recording. So once the moment passed it was gone and we could not share it with anyone else. – Tatijana 5 years ago
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  • I think LOLRANDOM HUMOR is just adding another category to humor - people find absurdity funny and that's what people are taking advantage of. It's similar to TV programming, as some people prefer shows with laugh tracks such as The Big Bang Theory (although they use a real audience), and some people prefer more 'sophisticated' humor such as Community. It's all about preference! – YsabelGo 5 years ago
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Latest Comments

JKKN

I enjoyed this article quite a bit, despite my disagreement with it. Your argument is compelling, your style is smooth, and overall, this is a great piece of writing. I just can’t bring myself to say that screenplays do not qualify as art, and not just because I write them. Screenplays, even unproduced ones, can be just as visual as novels if they are written well. In a sense, one needs to become familiar with the visual formula and grammar of film in order to make sense of a screenplay, just as one needs to become familiar with the written formula and grammar of other written works. Scripts–when written correctly and succinctly–almost take on a poetic nature in the way that every word must be chosen for a reason, every action pushing the story forward. Novels have the luxury of lengthy, helpful descriptions to paint a story for the reader–screenplays do not, mostly because of the simple fact that it would be pointless. However, for all my criticism, I sincerely enjoyed your article, and look forward to more!

The Literary Merit of Film Scripts
JKKN

I do think what this article points out about these show is pretty important in the sense that, while entertaining and capable of giving us all respite from the suckiness of whatever goes on in our daily lives, they are, first and foremost, entertainment. They’re great shows, and I’d love to see a hundred more comedians with the raw personality of Stewart or the affability of Oliver or the razor wit of Colbert. But it can be dangerous at times to mix business with pleasure, and at moments where the general audience needs undiluted news, these shows–and any news show on T.V., really–may not be the best sources.

Real or Reel? The Complicated Personas of Political Comedians
JKKN

The greatest strength of The Legend Of Korra is no doubt how willing it is to delve into the dark gunk of humanity’s inner-workings, providing intricate and complex stories, fascinating characters, a world that isn’t too far removed from our own in terms of societal conflict, and above all, maintaining these themes and concepts despite technically being a kids show. Fantastic show, fantastic analysis of said fantastic show.

Politics and Privilege in The Legend of Korra
JKKN

I personally think some of the best material from South Park comes directly from its ability to not only warp the show’s plotlines into completely insane situations and occurrences, but the fact that it still contains such brilliant satire and strikingly accurate commentary is amazing given how ridiculous it oftentimes makes the context of said satire.

South Park: Respect Their Commentarah