JMPetrequin

SUNY Potsdam English major. Peer tutor. Reviewer/news writer/podcast host/copy editor for HeyPoorPlayer.com. Hopeful future novelist/webcomicist. Coffee enthusiast.

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Until Dawn versus Life is Strange: Same Effect, Different Butterflies

Until Dawn and Life is Strange are both video games this year that have tackled the idea of the butterfly effect. Both are cinematic adventure games with a heavy focus on narrative, and both are built around the consequences of choices the player makes. Does one game do things better than the other in this regard? Does Until Dawn lack a unique mechanic when compared to Life is Strange’s time-travel powers, or does the latter overcomplicate things? Which game creates a better network of cause and effect, and which does a better job of maintaining that web?

  • I enjoyed both of these games and the only similarity between them is the idea of the butterfly effect. I think Until Dawn utilizes the idea of player choice better, simply because there is multiple endings one could acquire. In Life is Strange, no matter your previous decisions in the game, your ending is either A or B. – Lexzie 4 years ago
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Latest Comments

My only issue with the infected is that the earlier stages seem a bit too much like generic zombies. When later stages are so cool and unique, why do the earlier ones have to seem quite so much like other stuff we’ve seen before?

The Last Of Us: Inspiration Behind the Infected

I think part of the misplaced hate for Skyler White also has to be pinned on a misunderstanding of what her character is meant to be in relation to Walter. I think that she is actually meant to act as a kind of antagonist throughout many parts of the show, especially in the first two seasons. She is certainly not cast in the same light as Gus or Jack, but I think that those looking to find a protagonist in her are looking in the wrong place. Skyler is as complex as Walter himself, and just like Walter, she is no hero.

Refusal to Settle: Why I Love Skyler White

Very interesting article to read, especially just a couple days after having seen The Visit myself. What I find interesting about that film is that, although I would not call it “good” by any stretch of the imagination, the plot twist within its third act is not what I find fault with. To try and discuss it as best as I can without spoiling anything, the twist at the end of the film would not have worked if it had not been for specific elements of setup that occurred at the very beginning. It’s conditional, and the conditions are met. My hope is that this indicates a new trend for Shamalyan going forward, where his movies, even if bad, have entertaining twists, enough so to rank them in the “good-bad” category alongside stuff like The Room and Birdemic.

The Rise and Fall of M. Night Shyamalan