KatieNoelWinters

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Latest Topics

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    Shows about serial killers make people apathetic towards them

    How is it possible that shows like Dexter and Hannibal are so popular?

    • Very nice topic to discuss! If only I had had more time, I would surely do this. We can discuss who shows like this are both, a good and a bad thing in our society. – Abhimanyu Shekhar 5 years ago
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    • I like this topic, and it's very interesting to talk about how its done. The key to it is that the serial killer has to have a motive that is relatable to its viewers. Light Yagami from death note starts killing criminals because he wants the world to be a better place, and slowly over the course of the show he loses his way making his journey interesting. – Cojo 5 years ago
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    • I am one of those people who sympathize with such characters, they are always my favourites in the show. It's an interesting topic and I think it's important to discus why people like them so much. In Dexter's case especially it's easier for viewers to relate with him because he has "Harry's Code," shows present them as still having a sort of moral code. For example, Dexter's later girlfriend who is also a serial killer was not exactly a favourite character because she didn't share those moral guidelines and attacks Debra because she feels threatened by her ability to take Dexter's attention away from her. The show argues that Dexter can't help his urges, it's a mental disorder that he struggles to overcome. Hannibal doesn't have the same excuse as Dexter to be liked (underlying morals) but I think because he is presented as so intelligent and aware of what he's doing, viewers side with him because they feel that he's a product of his society. – Slaidey 5 years ago
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    • We can add The Following and Criminal Minds to the mix. To better tackle the question involves asking about popularity and does it make people more apathetic? Can we humanize them yet not forget their heinous acts? I suggest waiting until Richard Armitage does his take on Francis Dolarhyde to really get this topic cooking. – fdemelo 5 years ago
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    • Don't forget other shows that glamorize and almost sexually lavish themselves in serial murder. There was [The Following] and the failed attempted clone [The Cult]. [Dexter] is mild compared to [The Following] and [Hannibal]. – wolfkin 5 years ago
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    • There's definitely a romanticization element to it as well. Shows like Hannibal and Dexter have created fandoms where people even romanticize actual serial killers (i.e. entire blogs dedicated to Jeffrey Dahmer). I also think it'd be helpful to note that this trend started in literature. Hannibal Lecter is Thomas Harris' creation in "Red Dragon" and "Silence of the Lambs." If you'd like to look to non-ficiton, there was also a bit of controversy surrounding Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood" (which is also a movie) where he humanizes murderers Dick Hickock and Perry Smith to a point where Capote was speculated to have romantic feelings towards Perry Smith. – pixiemina 5 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    This was a fantastic article on the history of Wonder Woman through her various renditions. I believe that the thing that has made Wonder Woman have so much staying power and the ability to have various reboots is because of her original creation. William Moulton Marston instilled values he observed from two women he loved in his life. Because of this he was able to see woman in different ways and create a more realistic woman then heroine. Wonder Woman portrays how many facets woman can have. The only trouble with the cinematic universe is making sure they stick to her characters core qualities and not compromise them to make a good film. Wonder Woman has always been able to handle the men in he life, whether they are heroes or villains, so in the films she should be much like Black Widow is to the Avengers, her own woman who can kick ass, take names, but also cry and fall in love.

    The History of Wonder Woman: Unlocking Her Cinematic Potential

    I think you make really valid points and understand this duality really well. I’d like to add that in terms of Jason Todd and Barbara Gordon, is that heroes often make the wrong choice by pushing away the ones they love and care about to protect them from harm, when in reality this just weakens the hero’s overall effectiveness. It may hurt the hero when one of their inner circle is hurt or has something tragic happen to them, but without involving them, there is no point to a secret identity because knowing anyone would put the hero at risk. Everyone experiences these fears. About those they love getting hurt. But in the end it’s better to stand in a group then be alone. Life is about relationships and heroes like Batman need relationships to keep them grounded in their own lives. To lead real lives.

    Batman and Bruce: Superheroes and Identity

    I think you’re right about women and their ever expanding screen time and role prominence. I fear that making Robin a woman in the film would not be received as well and may come off as the industry wanting to be token progressive. I fully support making Robin a woman because it would be awesome and a nice step for women in comic book films and tv, not to mention the potential for new role models for women and girls.

    Should There be a Female Robin in Batman vs Superman?