Kenny Lim

Kenny Lim

A writer and blogger who focuses on television and books. Also, he likes hummus.

Junior Contributor II

  • Sharp-Eyed Citizen
  • ?
  • Articles
    1
  • Featured
    1
  • Comments
    4
  • Ext. Comments
    3
  • Processed
    2
  • Revisions
    2
  • Topics
    2
  • Topics Taken
    1
  • Notes
    2
  • Topics Proc.
    9
  • Topics Rev.
    0
  • Points
    219
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    105

Latest Articles

Latest Topics

1

The Use of Voice Overs in TV Shows: Effective or Distraction?

There have been a number of TV shows that have used voice overs. Such examples would be Veronica Mars, Burn Notice, Grey’s Anatomy, Scrubs and Dead Like Me. Do voice overs add anything to the story lines or are they merely a distraction? Why are voice overs used? Should they be used more or less often? Are there examples of TV shows that have used voice overs, but weren’t really effective? On the flip side, are there TV shows that could have used voice overs to help add depth or clarity to the story lines?

  • Good topic. Another possible example the article writer could use is Jane the Virgin. – Emily Deibler 5 years ago
    0
  • This would be great to write. I think bringing up something like Dexter as well. The show has a very complex voice over of Dexter the serial killer. Does he really believe in what he's saying? That he has no emotion and yet manages to portray it? Or is it simply him asserting that he is a monster and neglecting the idea that he could have other psychological levels? – tparish11 5 years ago
    1
  • In my opinion, they are often used to explicitly summarize events of the show or a characters feelings about said events (Scrubs is the best example) and for this reason they are often redundant and/or heavy-handed. They are not necessarily "distracting", but neither are they useful to the storyline. – TheSnob 5 years ago
    0
  • There are a few shows that have tried different things: Arrow had voice overs in its first season, then dropped them, and it would be interesting to examine why. – bbctol 5 years ago
    0
6

Is society uncomfortable with suicidal literary characters?

Mental illness in general is a delicate topic in today’s society. Mention the word suicide, and people instantly get uncomfortable and disturbed. Is it socially acceptable for a writer to write a story about a person with a mental illness who is suicidal? Should we encourage writers to write about potentially controversial topics and themes, or should they stick with those that are more conventional and would make readers more comfortable?

  • See "One Flew over the Coo Coo's Nest". – JDJankowski 5 years ago
    1
  • Depending on the direction the article takes, looking at classical examples such as Ophelia in Shakespeare's Hamlet might be something to do. – MichelleAjodah 5 years ago
    0
  • Another example is Septimus in Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. – Camille Brouard 5 years ago
    0
  • Obviously everyone is going to come down on the side of encouraging controversial topics. That's the point of writing and literature. To tackle those issues head-on. If you're trying to create a balanced article, maybe try starting from a hard position of "No, this topic is too sensitive" and talking yourself back. Start from the most unpopular opinion and see if that gets the juices flowing. – CrunchyEnglish 5 years ago
    3
  • Suicide has been present in literature for quite some time. I don't think that we are uncomfortable with suicide. Rather, I think it has been misunderstood. Particularly in Realist & Naturalist fiction women characters who behaved "immorally" for the time often committed suicide at the end as a form of literary justice (see works of Wharton, Chopin, Dreiser). I think the mental illness, and the way to portray it accurately in a story is the challenge. One of the finest examples is not a book, but the movie Silver Linings Playbook. Tackling mental illness, and presenting it as clearly and accurately as possible is a worthy literary goal. – eringesine 5 years ago
    0
  • Suicide is definitely something prevalent both in Japanese literature and Japanese society (which incidentally has among one of the highest suicide rates in the world.) Haruki Murakami explores suicide in many of his works, including "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle" and "Norwegian Wood." – jstorming 5 years ago
    1
  • Traditional Japanese theatre forms also use suicide as an acceptable ending to many plays. Perhaps a good angle might be - what is the difference between how suicide is socially accepted as a trope in Eastern lit/entertainment forms and how it is used/perceived in Western forms? In Japan, suicide has long been seen a noble way to die (especially on the battlefront) and the honorable thing to do when dealing with bringing shame to one's family. In the Western world, suicide is seen as tragic and/or selfish. – Katheryn 5 years ago
    0
  • The latter question about writing things that are "comfortable" is just plain silly. Of course we should use literature as a way to tackle the tough stuff, question convention, and explore even the ugly side of humanity. Is mental illness any more of a taboo than it was even ten years ago? Absolutely not. As medical science advances, and society gets better informed, rhetoric about mental illness changes. Take autism spectrum disorder for example. The term "on the spectrum" has entered society's casual lexicon. Books like The Reason I Jump, movies like Adam, and shows like Parenthood have created a safe social space in which to discuss the disorder. The same could be said for mental health issues like depression or suicide. I think a more interesting question here is at what age should kids be exposed to tough topics like this? I recently read a YA novel entitled My Heart and another Black Holes. Without any spoilers, the main character, a 17-year old girl, is suffering from severe depression and is suicidal. I found the novel handles this delicate issue incredibly well without sugar-coating or romanticizing it. I would recommend the novel to a young person above the age of say, 13, without reservation, but any younger than that and I'd hesitate. So what does that say about me? Perhaps I'm naive--wanting to preserve the innocence of a young person by keeping them ignorant of some of the terrible things in this world as if they didn't already know. – ladyabercrombie 5 years ago
    0

Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

Latest Comments

Kenny Lim

That is an excellent observation. The one thing I will have to disagree with you on is that I don’t think most female characters are portrayed as bossy and hard-headed. From the shows that I used as examples in this article, the only characters that really fit those characteristics are Monica and Leslie. Donna from Parks and Recreation is a character who’s often portrayed as being feared, but she’s not really bossy or hard-headed.

Relationship Gender Roles in Sitcoms: For Better or For Worse?
Kenny Lim

It’s funny. Reading this article, it seems like it would be easy to make writing less frustrating and more flowing. I’ve tried most of these suggestions before, and it just never works out for me. I get stuck. I get frustrated. I want to scream. It’s truly a horrible experience, but I still love to write. I will try these again. Most likely over and over. I keep telling myself it will eventually get better. I don’t know if I’m optimistic or delusional.

Attention Writers: The Myth of Writer's Block
Kenny Lim

I completely agree with you. I have absolutely no problem with Skyler, and I feel like she is the most realistic character and ties everything together. Marie, on the other hand, I’ve always found annoying.

Refusal to Settle: Why I Love Skyler White
Kenny Lim

I used to enjoy supernatural and fantasy shows, but I gave up a while ago. It’s no different than a crime drama. It follows a particular formula: Someone dies, the main character investigates, things slowly progress, more people die, a main character suddenly has an epiphany, someone almost gets killed, then the main characters save them, and everything is all fine and dandy again. I don’t know, I’m just no longer entertained by anything that follows a specific formula anymore.

Supernatural: Just Another Shapeshifter of Shows?