LaurenCarr

LaurenCarr

Previously a character TD in feature animation for 15 years, now teaching 3D Animation full time at Montclair State University and loving it!!

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    Amateurish Work Receiving Big Praise

    Many times artwork comes across amateurish. This has been ongoing since the beginning of time. Are there films that have made it to the big screen that got more attention than they should have? Did these film concepts appear as something you could’ve easily created yourself?

    • Whoever picks this up should choose the direction they decide to take this one wisely. There are a lot of places a topic this broad could go. From the original description, it looks like the Lauren is looking for a list-type article, but I think an analysis of how individual "amateurish" films got big would be appropriate, as well as an examination of the trend as a whole. – Austin 2 years ago
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    • Michael Bay would be a good example here. – Luke Smith 2 years ago
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    • Perhaps "Unfriended" would be a good film to analyze? Films that lack actual content. I agree with Luke, Michael Bay would be a great director to discuss. His films tend to lack an actual story and are fluffed up with explosions, fight scenes, and unnecessary romantic interests (*cough* Megan Fox *cough*). – nicolewethington 2 years ago
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    • Maybe this should be expanded to other genres. As its premise started with "art" I know that the annoying Orange is my biggest pet peeve. Maybe it even raises homicidal thoughts in me.Perhaps looking at how some of these amateurish process are low budget with lie overhead edging allows companies to see better profit margins much like "Reality TV" trends to Jane lower cost then scripted dramas. – fchery 2 years ago
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    Are today's love stories based on love that doesn't exist anymore?

    Love stories have stayed consistent however relationships have changed. Divorce is common when it wasn’t not too long ago. Men took care of their families but now women are needed to work and help out financially. Today’s economy dictates a relationship between two people resulting in a much different direction than ever before.

    • Lauren very good, as our society evolves so does love and what it means to our personal identity. – Venus Echos 2 years ago
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    • This seems like a great topic! You would have to ask what love means to us now. Not an easy task, but very interesting. – dannyjs 2 years ago
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    • Just because I'm watching Parenthood right now and family dynamics are constantly changing and being compared to the grandparents "old world" dynamics, I think it would be interesting to compare TV to romantic Films with this concept. – Chelsea Weaver 2 years ago
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    • It might be helpful to look at the origins of love as we know it today. For example, when did love marriages--as opposed to arranged and political marriages--overtake their counterparts? – Kristian Wilson 2 years ago
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    • A great film to note for this discussion is Her (2013). How does technology affect the notion of love and family in today's society. Does it make people closer or push them further apart? How do film, television, and other outlets take this evolution and tell good stories from them? – Giovanni Insignares 2 years ago
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    • The Twilight series likes to believe that it is based on classic love stories (Romeo & Juliet and others). Using those two standards (Twilight now vs R&J then) might be an interesting way to approach this topic. I've always disliked Romeo & Juliet b/c the characters are hormone-driven teenagers who shouldn't be making decisions -- but when it was written, 15 yr olds *were* getting married to people they barely knew. Translated into modern times, the situation looks slightly ridiculous. Does the classic standard of expectation necessarily result in a untenable situation when applied to modern times? Or is that a failure of the translator? – Monique 2 years ago
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    • Another question that could tie into that is: are fictional stories giving us unrealistic expectations for love? Not many people seem to be happy with the love they find these days, and that could be due to the innumerable romance tales being portrayed in book and film form. – Ellencrypted 2 years ago
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    • But in the end, what are love stories? Fiction. Can we not then realize that what we see on the screen is just a story or must we take literally what the film shows us as to be real. If we acknowledge that it is a story, then is it really issue. After all isn't the story about love and not the real world? If we view everything as real and therefore needing to be changed, how can romance then even exist? After all courtly love was an artificial construction and in theory is not believed to have been practiced. Must we take the romance out of life. If divorce is common it is because usually it is not love but rather lust. Then when people change, things become complicated and fall apart. So then what? What shall we call love? Can we still find an ideal? I hope these questions and thoughts help. – Travis Kane 2 years ago
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    The Post-Production Process of a Film

    What goes into a film once it’s in post? Many times we will get to see the actor’s cut and the video looks like a home video. How do they bring the magic into making the finished product?

    • Would this article look at post-production process through different types of editing technology or could it look through the history of film making in terms of post-production, how advances in technology have made certain editing techniques possible. – Ryan Errington 2 years ago
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    • It would be interesting to talk about how much say the studio has over the final product. Sometimes it's for the best, but sometimes, studio interference can hurt a directors artistic visions; ex: David Lynch's Dune. – HatchAttack 2 years ago
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    Hair and Makeup: A Tough Job Thanks to HDTV

    Technology has created a television giving viewers a roadmap towards every detail of the actor’s skin and hair. Lace front wigs are no longer undetectable, and the thick theater style makeup looks blatant. Actors are typically vein, how is the hair and makeup industry dealing with new television technology?

    • Ooo this could be intersting, be sure to try and find some facts about how make-up and hair that looks awful now was received at the time - did it seem good then?Phillipa Boyens ( i think) made a comment on the Two Towers commentry about them deliberately trying to keep the pores and mud on thier actors (except the elves, of course)Also, 'vain' – Francesca Turauskis 2 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    LaurenCarr

    Such a great article! Thank you!

    A History of Colour: The Difficult Transition from Black and White Cinematography
    LaurenCarr

    This was a nice read. I appreciate knowing I’m not the only one with these issues!!

    Writing: The Real Reason You Procrastinate
    LaurenCarr

    Nice article! I agree with the comment about more men in the industry. There are a lot more women working behind the scenes, it should have a positive impact.

    The Female Superhero: A New Age of Superhero Movies
    LaurenCarr

    I can’t believe it’s been 35 years already. It should be interesting to see how they celebrate it.

    Gundam for Newcomers: Traits To Look Forward To
    LaurenCarr

    Great read. It’s typical for last shows/seasons to be a let down or at least not as strong as the beginning. I like your perspective.

    Why the How I Met Your Mother Series Finale was Actually Genius
    LaurenCarr

    Interesting and informative, great article!

    Decoding the Oscars
    LaurenCarr

    Great article. The effects were incredible, ILM’s best work IMO.

    The Value of Humanity in Darren Aronofsky's Noah
    LaurenCarr

    I love your opinion on Grease, it’s so true. What’s funny is Didi Conn (Frenchy) is in my bootcamp class.

    10 Overlooked Facts From Your Favorite Movies