Tatijana

Tatijana

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Latest Topics

    9
    Published

    Old Vampires vs New Vampires

    A lot of people are vampire’d out these days. That’s because they have been so popular that we haven’t been able to escape these stories. Vampire stories aren’t new though, we have ton that existed prior to the 2000’s. Why weren’t we sick of them before? I’d like to see a compare contrast of older vampire stories compared to new ones. Were they better before? Or just less popular? Are the target audiences different? Were the stories more meaningful or easier to relate to? Scarier? What makes people so sick of vampire stories now, but not sick of them before even though tons of stories still existed?

    Ideas for older examples:
    Dracula – book and various movies.
    Anne Rice – So many books
    Buffy – comics and tv show

    New
    Twilight
    Vampire Diaries
    Vampire Academy
    Trueblood

    You can draw the line between new and old whenever you want and obviously there are a lot more examples.

    • It could be interesting to take the inundation of content relating to 'The Zombie' and compare it to that of 'The Vampire' - why have we replaced, in the last 20 years or so, one with the other (if we have!), and what does this say about us culturally? What do zombies do for us now that vampires can't? Or perhaps they accomplish the same goal? – ageofmythology 2 years ago
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    • I like your take on the topic a lot! I think you should just submit Zombies vs Vampires and our fears/what it says about it yourself. I think it could be different enough from this topic to qualify as its own. – Tatijana 2 years ago
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    • I think that's fair! But I also think the story of our modern fascination with the vampire, particularly it's end, definitely ties into our obsession with zombies. Maybe the popularization of zombies influenced our perception of vampires and contributed to our ever changing understanding and fascination with this age old creature.Also for older examples you could go really and old start with Polidori's "The Vampyre," and you could even compare Dracula to and with its adaptions (Nosferatu and Bram Stoker's Dracula). – ageofmythology 2 years ago
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    • You can even include 2 legal documentations of vampires in Serbia. Yes... they actually have 2 documentations of vampires by gov't officials haha. Also, creepy. I think there is also a vampire like creature in Japanese folklore too, but I forget it's name. – Tatijana 2 years ago
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    • This is a really interesting topic! I'd be interested in seeing where you draw the line between "old" and "new." (Millennial vampirism?) Also, I'd definitely suggest The Vampyre, Varney the Vampire, and Carmilla as possible older works to observe as well; they predate Dracula, though Dracula is certainly a highly influential cornerstone (the second most-appearing Western film character!). Also, since a lot of older vampires focus on xenophobic aristocracy or actual upper class killers (Elizabeth Bathory; Vlad Tepes), the origins and symbolism between old and new vampires certainly differ. – emilydeibler 2 years ago
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    • Rather than do an old vs new it would probably be better to follow the evolution of the vampire and study how the vampires change reflects the fears of society at the time of their writing. The original Dracula was a reflection of debotchery however he was also sophisticated which created a feeling of unease because at the time higher class people would never do anything against the social norm. To do so was something monsterous and Draculas womanizing and relatively open sexuality challenged those ideals, makng him a monster hiding in the venear of the elite. Nowadays thats not the case so Dracula as he was then is somewhat irrelevant so he (and vampires in general) have changed to reflect the fears of the time period – Cojo 2 years ago
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    • Additionally, there is a more recent web series titled Carmilla that would be a good source to pull from. It was conceptualized based on the Gothic novella with the same title written by Sheridan Le Fanu, published in 1871, a year, you may notice, that predates the publication of Dracula! – Adelyn 2 years ago
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    • Also curious where the line between "old" and "new" is being drawn - also, I think the differences in genre conventions between TV series, movies, and novels deserve some attention - but I've heard the argument that a lot of these new "vampire" series are merely using the vampire aesthetic to add an element of dark allure to what really is an otherwise quotidian drama/romance (rather than exploring the "true" nature of the traditional vampire). I can kind of see it, but I've never read/watched any of the new series other than Twilight (at least in full) so I have no right to make a judgment call. If we consider this argument for a second, this zombie comparison that we're discussing brings up a neat point: vampires are sexy, zombies are ugly; humans in Twilight and Vampire Diaries are romantically involved with vampires, humans in The Walking Dead run the heck away from zombies; the nature of vampires (i.e. eternal life, adverse reaction to light, etc.) in some modern series (e.g. Twilight) is used as a relationship obstacle in what becomes a drama, the nature of zombies (i.e. I'LLEATYOU) in all modern series I've encountered remains a crucial plot point that keeps the plot alive and explores what it means to be human - or not be human anymore. So, I'm wondering if it's not so much a disdain for vampires as much as a disdain for using something historically awesome as a prop in a (dare I say it?) chick flick. – countessaart 2 years ago
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    • I think this topic is pretty interesting but you need to have boundaries for research purposes, like have a definition of old and new? Because as far as I know, Dracula (1890) is more than a century precedent to Anne Rice's (1980) vampires... I don't think they should be grouped together so haphazardly... as well as Buffy (1990's). The person writing this could follow the evolution of vampires in the popular discourse say: how differently they are treated... I actually see Dracula vs Edward Cullen in this... because you know, they both argue chastity in a way which kind of curious. – Jill 2 years ago
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    7

    Art As Medicine

    Can art be used as a means of therapy or treatment? We already have research suggesting that certain colors evoke certain emotions and feelings. We also have research suggestion that certain images and music may do the same thing. Is it possible that patients with minor behavioral issues could be helped by meditating over an image when they become sad or even angry? Or perhaps that sad music could be listened to to evoke low emotions and allow grieving, and then quickly followed by happier music to bring a person back to a positive state of mind?

    • I like this topic! I know, for example, shellshocked soldiers during WWI read Jane Austen novels to relieve their mental turmoil. The concept of having a healthy psyche which, in turn, leads to healthy recovery is a wonderful topic that I'd love to read more about. – Connor 2 years ago
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    • I'm a music major, and several of my profs have mentioned the rise of music therapy. It's a rapidly growing field. Perhaps that could be part of this topic; is there a reason that art is being valued more and more as a type of therapy? – Laura Jones 2 years ago
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    • I do believe the healing power of art. During my depression period, I started teaching myself watercolor and oil painting. When creating, you can focus on the present and allow yourself occupied by the color, brush strokes and images. You then forget the unpleasant past and uncertain future. You are so happy with the high productivity. Making arts can release your inner artist and enables you to get to know a new community. New way of seeing and thinking open your mind winder and make your heart bigger. In creating art work, you understand all kinds of emotions and want to let them out in a comfortable way. By doing art, I realize I have more aesthetic capacity and can see beauty in everything now...... Becoming an artist, awakening/seeking an authentic self ... – HappyNewYing 2 years ago
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    • I stumbled upon this article that could help in your research of this topic:http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/news/11403404/Art-does-heal-scientists-say-appreciating-creative-works-can-fight-off-disease.html I think it's a worthwhile topic best of luck if you choose to pursue it! – kaliveach 2 years ago
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    • Something to note could also be the rise of therapeutic adult coloring books. – MichelleAjodah 2 years ago
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    • Yes it can; there are degree programs in Art Therapy, Music Therapy and Drama Therapy - they are legitimate occupations (and require a lot of education - you have to have undergraduate degrees in psychology AND art/music/theatre, and then get a Master's or PhD in the particular therapy, so it can take up to a decade to get a license. There are also only 34 universities in the United States that offer EPAB-approved Art Therapy graduate degree programs, so they are hard to come by, even if you have the time to devote to them). Exploring specific strategies of these therapies (such as the possibilities you presented) is probably a better topic than asking if they exist. – Katheryn 2 years ago
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    • As someone pursuing a bachelors degree in music therapy, I know – not even think – that music is healing.The field grows every day, with more people becoming more aware of what music therapy is all about. It is not the mere listening to music to lift spirits or playing music for others’ relaxation and enjoyment (though it does include these techniques, don’t get me wrong); it involves so much more, for example: creating music, movement to music, socialization, storytelling using music, and a combination of these. Even silence can be used if it is what the client responds to.Music itself is therapeutic, and when implemented in an intimate clinical setting with a trained professional, it only enhances the effect. From what I have read and seen of case studies, music can help people with depression, autism, dementia (this is a big one), and various physiological problems, to name a few. I’m not going to dwell upon what “officially” constitutes as music therapy (according to my textbooks), but I can say that every individual’s reaction to music is unique; no one situation is the same, and therefore, there is no one universal music therapy technique that everybody will respond to.Long story short, music is therapeutic and healing, but music therapy is so much more. – thiaxmusic 1 year ago
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    6

    Why we can't get enough revenge.

    People have been reading and writing stories of revenge for about as long as stories have existed. From tales of vengeful gods/goddesses, to The Count Of Monte Cristo, to Kill Bill, it seems like people through the ages really love their stories of revenge. The theme isn’t just found in writing, we see it pop up anywhere there is a story line: video games, comics, even songs. Are these forms of entertainment a way for us to vicariously feel like we’ve gotten back at our own enemies? Or do we simply delight in the dark side of these stories?

    • Interesting topic. I appreciate that you've even thought of this topic, because it may be something that should be looked at from a moral perspective. Like perhaps our love for revenge-stories reveals something wrong with humanity as it now stands. Or perhaps vice versa. Just a thought... – Dominic Sceski 2 years ago
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    • I like this topic... lots to discuss here! You're right; it is a very timeless theme. I wonder, though, to what degree this revenge theme reflects real life (yet another facet to explore!). Not everyone is revenge-seeking - perhaps they do get their satisfaction through fiction - but there are the occasional news stories, personal stories, or historical events that tell us that people do have a vengeful side that occasionally surfaces in very real ways. – Laura Jones 2 years ago
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    • I think revenge is a universal desire. Not necessarily in a dark way, but most people have been the subject of an unpleasant experience, and the feeling to get back at someone is natural. – TheoParry 2 years ago
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    • It is an emotional motive, and therefore is very helpful for writers when explaining a characters extreme actions. Good for drama too! – Candice Evenson 2 years ago
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    • I feel like people sometimes enjoy a sense of revenge or cruelty because it feels good or nice. After if they carry out the revenge or not is when we feel satisfied or hateful. – Wanderlust 2 years ago
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    • It may be helpful to look towards academia surrounding Melodrama as a form (think cape and sword, grand sweeping sentiment, spectacle) and how it has really taken over the way we tell stories. – Tiffany 2 years ago
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    • This is a really good topic. What if one were to look at it in light of Christianity, for example? There, the two concepts of justice and forgiveness seem to be at a premium, but it is not always easy to see how they relate. I guess the question you might come up against is the relationship of feelings aroused by literature versus feelings aroused by life. For example, if one believes in NOT getting revenge, will revenge literature thwart this commitment? Or will revenge literature instead help to put the dark feelings aside? Etc. – JWHorton 1 year ago
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    2

    Can Crowdfunding Help Anime in the US?

    Kickstarter is a company/website that helps people get funding for projects in various areas like arts, technology, crafts, etc. Several Kickstarter projects have been started by fans to pay for creations of extra seasons of their favorite shows. There are a few problems that anime lovers in the states run into:

    1. My favorite manga never got turned into an anime even though it should have.
    2. My favorite anime is older and is no longer being sold due to licensing. I can’t seem to find it anywhere and I’d really like to own it. Or I can find it and it costs a fortune because it is rare.
    3. Anime/Manga never got translated to English at all, so fans over here are missing out.
    Do you think kickstarter can help remedy these issues? How can we make people aware of kickstarter campaigns so that they can donate? Are there any other issues that kickstarter could potentially solve for US fans?

    Make this article your own, my intention is to use it to spread awareness so that maybe we can get more content in the US.

    • This would only work and be true if a particular distributor was willing to take on the risk and the challenge of adding it to their production schedule. Because in the case of anime licensing and distributing, it doesn't matter if it CAN be crowdfunded for those sparse individuals who want a particular release, it matters who's going to put up the campaign, and have the facilities and the know-how to get the title re-published and printed. Not just anyone can set up a Kickstarter for a re-release of a particular anime. So not only would fans have to still get the permission of the rights holders of a show to re-establish a license with a new entity (if the Kickstarter is successful), but you would also have to convince an American publisher to get involved who would want to take on the job of gathering all the assets together: most importantly, seeing if the previous distributor still has their former disk IMGs available in a storage somewhere, and still has their DVD covers, promotional material, original English dub recordings, and so on. Discotek Media has successfully done this quite a few times already, so I've been putting my money on them that if a particular show I used to like is out of print, they'd be the mostly likely to revive it, even without a crowdfunding campaign. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
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    • Yeah, I know and agree. I think what you'd have to do BEFORE throwing it up on kickstarter, is a fan would have to take the lead and contact these companies formally. They'd need to get estimates on how many dollars/etc it would take to complete the project. It's hard work, but it's the necessary first step. I think if people were more aware of it and REALLY loved something, they'd at least ask the question. And if a few successes were had, this could become a more popular way of getting these types of projects done.This topic is "can it help." So you point out a very big hurdle against it. – Tatijana 2 years ago
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    • Maybe you could change Kickstarter to crowdfunding. There are other sites that do the same thing such as IndieGoGo. Expanding this to crowdfunding allows whoever writes this the ability to expand the field of works that have succeeded in the past which leads to better resource materials. – Connor 2 years ago
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    • Done. I was not aware that this was a term or that other sites like it existed. Thanks. – Tatijana 2 years ago
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    • There's an anime crowdfunding site which managed to create a limited release for Creamy Mami. I forget the name but if you Google you should be able to find it. Actually making manga turned into an anime would have to be something in the Japanese market? – Jordan 2 years ago
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    • It was called Anime Sols or something – Jordan 2 years ago
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    1

    People and Possession

    If you love something, let it go. If it comes back, it was meant to be.
    People have a hard time understanding that though, and instead want to possess other people. What are some reasons, we feel the need to "own" other people? What are some examples of these reasons being acted out in various pieces of literature. For example, in "A Picture of Dorian Gray" we see two characters fight over Dorian’s friendship. There are several examples of them trying to keep him away from each other. Perhaps, one wants to possess someone so that they can feel needed and loved completely like the witch who wishes to keep Rapunzel locked away in a tower. Or maybe your author didn’t finish writing your favorite story exactly how you wanted it. You decide to lock him in your house until he finishes it "correctly" as in Stephen King’s "Mercy". And of course there is the obvious. Love. We can find many references to wanting to own someone just because we love them.

    • Maybe think more about what lens you want to look at this from. Is the possession used to drive plot/conflict? Or is is used in a psychological sense to build characters? – MichelleAjodah 2 years ago
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    • I think marriage and the language/rituals surrounding it might be a more convincing form of ownership for the theory that love leads to this desire for ownership. I also think that Dorian Gray, at least from the friendship angle, is maybe not such a great support, though maybe you could convince me (but it would take a bit so maybe just focus on one literary work especially if it is more of a stretch). – KateC33 2 years ago
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    • That's just one probably bad example. My topic also doesn't have to focus on love. I'm trying to get people to think about the many reasons a person may want to control or "keep" someone and find examples of such reasons in literature. Maybe someone wants to befriend or marry someone else for power or money. You could even find a book involving kidnapping as "possessing this person" could lead trading them for money. Just get creative with it. In fact, I'd not use love as an example because it's obvious and overdone. – Tatijana 2 years ago
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    • I do like the psychological angle that you are taking. You may find that it is more worthwhile to narrow your literary focus to just one of your aforementioned works (personally, I would go for a more classical piece of literature, but that is my personal preference). But this seems to be fine as is. – JDJankowski 2 years ago
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    • Other pieces of literature that would work well with this theme of possession and love:-A Doll's House (Nora is owned by her husband and treated like a child until she realizes that her personal growth is more important than her duty to others) -Merchant of Venice (Portia and the probably-gay-Antonio fight over the affections of Bassanio by trying to make him the most indebted to them) – thekellyfornian 2 years ago
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    • Maybe it would be good to consider the ways in which people take possession of others in specific physical senses. How do the body parts interplay with the reasons for desiring possession? – jilltcundari 2 years ago
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    • "We accept the love we think we deserve" - Stephen Chbosky. That being said, perhaps 'possession' in a friendship is a matter of perspective. To one who has never experienced a genuine friendship, being owned might just be second best! Interesting topic. – SuzetteA 2 years ago
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    The increasing amount of writers and how it affects the quality of literature.

    With the increasing abundance of resources to help writers create, publish, and advertise their works, comes an increase in new less experienced authors. It seems that everyone who wants to be an author can! This gives people, who otherwise would never have written a book, the opportunity to share their stories, but how does this affect the quality of literature? How do we decide what is worth reading?

    • Accidentally submitted the revision before I was finished and can't edit the revision.Writers in the title shouldn't have the apostrophe. There are also a couple grammar mistakes in the body of the post itself. – nsnow 2 years ago
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    • This is interesting! Would be good to explore how although anyone can now write, becoming an author and making a living out of it is a lot harder than before. It's quite paradoxical but does make sense, and would be interesting to research. – Rachel Elfassy Bitoun 2 years ago
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    • Things to consider: Websites like http://nanowrimo.org/ that motivate people to write their book in a month. This gives people a community of motivation and also a written commitment to finish books they may usually have never started or given up on. Amazon's self publishing gives author's a free way to publish the books straight to ebook format. They no longer need to go through the hoops of a publishing company and/or editors. Bookbub provides advertising of books and coaxes people into reading them since they are free or reduced price.All these loopholes can let lower quality writing filter out to the public without being corrected/fact checked. – Tatijana 2 years ago
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    • Great topic. It may be worth going into some success stories of self-published authors too, such as Hugh Howey's Wool series or the evolution of Scott Sigler's Ancestor from free audibook to current TPB. – mattdoylemedia 2 years ago
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    • This is an amazing idea, and one's answer to it really depends on what you think the goal of writing is. Some more traditional, ivory-tower, "Great Books" viewpoints on literature is will probably be really frustrated at lots of subpar, self-published authors, since the goal is to produce technically excellent literature with sweeping, universal themes. However, if the goal is self-expression, and the ability to understand other people, then having a multiplicity of voices is wonderful, because it lets underprivileged writers, who might not have otherwise had a voice, get heard. – thekellyfornian 2 years ago
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    • I think this would have to focus on the many avenues of publishing and less on the actual act of writing. Everyone has always been able to write, but now we're in a time when Amazon and other websites allow you to publish your work and sell it. Also, maybe mention the most commonly purchased genres from self-publishing. – Austin Bender 2 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    Tatijana

    I didn’t say non Jews. I said a different race. The average person probably couldn’t tell one white ethnicity from another, but may be confused if they were seeing Asian people playing Jewish people.

    Whitewashing of Asian Characters in Hollywood Anime/Manga Adaptations
    Tatijana

    That’s really eerie how they both died that close to each other in time.

    Sunshine, Celluloid, and Shantytowns: The Hollywood Novel and The Great Depression
    Tatijana

    I wish we could take a few pages from the Japanese book as far as how children are taught to act in school and also violent crimes..

    What the West Learned About Japanese Culture from Anime
    Tatijana

    I LOVE parodies. I find them clever. Don Quixote is my favorite book. I have no knowledge of what is parodies, but I found it clever and hilarious. I have also never met another person who has read and loved this book 🙁

    The Art of Parody: Imitation With a Twist
    Tatijana

    Yep I haven’t heard of him. Also I find it interesting that a semi bad guy gets married so many times haha!

    Deadpool: The Origin Story
    Tatijana

    I personally love the new twists on old themes. We can’t really pinpoint where older themes came from. So a part of us is allowed to believe they actually come from truth, whereas newer ideas obviously came from the author and aren’t real. So I feel like revamping old stories makes them feel more real.

    Fantasize the Fantasy Tomorrow
    Tatijana

    Yikes. Looks painful and weird. But art is something I will never claim to understand.

    Spotlight on Lauren Kalman: Pleasure and Pain In Gold
    Tatijana

    I really wish I had some sort of knowledge or passion I could throw on youtube and get famous over haha. Ugh.

    Snacks for Thought: 5 ‘Edutainment’ YouTube Channels To Improve Your Knowledge