Dominic Sceski

Dominic Sceski

Author of the fantasy/anime series "The Golden Lands", Dominic Sceski is a home-schooled high school student in love with writing, anime, fantasy, and God.

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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

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Comics, Movies, Literature, Fiction: What is the Most Influential Type of Art?

Which type of art has proven to be the most influential when it comes to impacting society? "Influential" means that the form of art inspires not just the individual to think in a certain, new way, but all of society is swayed to change for the better, as encouraged by the form of art. The common people is often influenced or empowered by whatever they’ve been reading or watching to initiate change in society. Comics were largely influential in the 1900s, movies (especially from Marvel) are widely popular now, and works of literature and fiction still reside as one of the top forms of art used to influence the people of society. Which, if any, of the art forms listed is the best way to positively impact the world? Why?

  • What do you mean by "influential"? I think if you make the meaning explicit, your topic shall gain unparalleled depth, and your argument unparalleled strength. (Also, I think it's "the common people ARE," not is) – Luthien 2 years ago
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  • Without a doubt, the answer is literature. It has been around for centuries and can be transported anywhere in the world and be preserved for years on paper. Whether it be in America in a modern living room or on the streets of India, anyone can be impacted by literature as long as the individual has the ability to read. Movies can't be shared everywhere because not every place on Earth has the means to play a movie, and comics don't engage the human mind like literature does. Literature is by far the most influential type of art. Just look at works like the Bible, Beowulf, Hemingway, Harry Potter. It comes in all sorts of forms and impacts all sorts of people. – dcorder 2 years ago
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  • In the grand scheme of things, Literature has and will likely always be the most influential type of art, due to 100s of stories and novels lasting the test of time, being quoted, being performed, and being adapted over and over again. However, I think the influential power of something can shift depending on one's age and exposure. Less people read actual books these days, and read more material online in short click-bait articles or comment sections and forums. At the same time, Youtube videos, TV shows, and movies seem to be the most influential form of art for quite a while growing up, unless you were just an avid reader the whole time. I personally never was much of a reader, but I'm actually finding myself re-embracing books again, so that may soon change. But for me, nothing has compared to movies with how many ideas, concepts, and creative images they have born into my mind. Movies and Animation are what drive me to do what I do with my own filmmaking and art. Books had nothing to do with that. At least not yet. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
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  • I'd say for today it's movies except that so many are based on literature. – Tigey 10 months ago
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Self Publishing: What is the Best Way to Advertise Your Book

(Note: I am very interested in seeing this topic become an article. Being a self published author who struggles to advertise my books successfully, I’m in need of a few fresh ideas, both ideas presented by the article itself and by the comments that will follow. Thanks so much to whomever writes this!)

In today’s world, many people aspire to become full-fledged authors. However, agents and publishing companies can only take on so many clients. Thus, many people resort to self publishing, meaning that every work they produce must be advertised by themselves. There are many ways to advertise a book, both on the internet and off, but where do self published authors find the best venues to promote their books? What techniques could be employed by authors to draw attention and interest to their books? List techniques or venues on the internet and off, as well as how authors of fiction can promote their books in contrast to authors of non-fiction.

  • I think this is an interesting topic, too. I've self-published a book myself and struggle with marketing it. I did find, however, that giving out ARCs and holding free giveaway contests (like on Goodreads, or on my blog) helps generate interest and even reviews. Needless to say, they won't always be GOOD reviews, but the old mantra, "Any press is good press," applies here. That's just been my experience, though. I'd love to hear what more successful self-pubbed authors have to say! – Christina 2 years ago
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  • I really like this idea. I think you could develop a very intriguing article that a lot of people reading this magazine would find extremely helpful. I think you could utilize a "step-by-step" section within this article to break it down even further and help self-publishing become even less daunting. Love it! - Emily – emilykirsten 2 years ago
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  • The obvious [url="http://www.google.co.uk"]answer[/url] is no, you shouldn't, but at the same time it does raise questions about what we are doing as a society and what we are missing out on. Instead of going and achieving dreams and accomplishing goals we are sitting in front of a YouTube screen watching others enjoy themselves. A good example of this is a YouTube star that goes by the name of PewDiePie. PewDiePie is famous for his videos where he will play video games and make comments about them.Sounds like a fun little hobby, but for him it is a full-time job where he raked in over $7 million dollars in 2014 himself and at one point was purchased by Disney. Now what does that say about a society when instead of playing video games we now watch other people have fun playing them. It is odd that we have the need to watch someone accomplish their goals or dreams and never actually accomplish any of ours. Another good example is how important celebrity gossip has become in our society (An easy pun on this article). Of course you must have heard of the Kardashians, or maybe a hundred other celebrities who you have heard of, but know nothing about. What is our strategy, why do we sit and eat up all of this information when it has nothing to do with us in our daily lives?We want to accomplish something, but by talking about all of this nonsense nothing is actually being accomplished. Maybe we should stop talking, complaining, or making a mockery of things that do not pertain to us and start dealing with stuff that does. By doing this we may actually be accomplishing what we want to do instead of eyeing up what other people are accomplishing. At the same time, sure some people do like making jokes of other people that they do not know, or complain about them and they do receive benefits. Looking back at the Shia LeBeouf video, there are pun videos that have received tens of millions of views. "Shia LeBeouf - Just Do It" is a complete joke on itself. It is entertaining and funny with a bunch of stupid motions thrown in. That is what we need. We need something that is entertaining to watch, yet at the same time the video to be motivating. While it is a joke to itself he is doing what he wants and he is trying to get other people to do it too through the<a href="https://www.google.com">power</a> of motivation. – JustinMcElroy 2 years ago
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Anime on the Rise

Does anybody else feel like anime is slowly becoming more popular? What is it about anime that makes us so excited, so emotional, so drawn into the story and the lives of the characters? What are the ways that anime can make society a better place…and what are the ways people can take the lessons or ideals of anime and misinterpret them? It’s an important question, especially since anime is on the rise. How will it affect us?

  • I would make sure that there's some actual data to back this up before trying to write this. I feel like anime has become more popular, but I've also only come into anime in the last few years, so I have a very warped view based on my own shifting awareness. This could become too subjective very easily, so I would pull in some cold, hard facts to give the article a solid argument. You might be able to acquire such data from websites such as myanimelist. The data might be hard to get, but I would be willing to help anyone who wants to write this article. PM me if you need help finding the data or crunching numbers. – OddballGentleman 2 years ago
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  • I think you have a point here. I actually watched anime a decent bit before this recent boom in popularity. Just five-six years ago admitting to liking anime or manga was a bit of a taboo. So I agree that you need data, but I don't think finding that data or making that assertion will be difficult. However, something to keep in mind that not all anime, just not like all shows, are good. There has been a lot of controversy over anime lately, as there has been more of a demand, there has been more of a turnout. But quantity doesn't equal quality, and many people have noticed an increase objectification of young girls and women in shows, as well as more sexually inappropriate themes. Remember: Japan is not a Western culture, they have different standards and different philosophies. A good example is the fact that the age of consent in Japan in 13, and objectification of young girls is common. So there can be problematic elements in anime as well. You even have one of the biggest creators of anime and a huge influence on Western culture commenting that 'anime was a mistake'. Now, I don't necessarily agree with this, but that doesn't mean he doesn't have a legitimate reason to say this. There are some great things that anime can turn out, one of my favorite shows for example is Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood. So when examining ideals and misinterpretation keep in mind that quality isn't always going to be up to par, and that some of this boom in popularity may not be for the better. – MIKAILARUSHING 2 years ago
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"Korragraphy": Choreography Mistakes in The Legend of Korra

The Legend of Korra, created by Michael Dante DiMartino and Bryan Konietzko, is a spin-off of Avatar: The Last Airbender. The Legend of Korra initially aired on Nickelodeon, but by the third season, the show had become listed as an "online only show", due to its online popularity being so much greater than its popularity on television.

The Legend of Korra, much like its "parent" show, contains lots of action, disputes between characters, and intriguing plot-twists. What is most noteworthy in The Legend of Korra, in comparison to Avatar: The Last Airbender, is the shift in the style of plot/scene-pacing as well as the style of combat that is enacted by the characters.

This may be a heavily opinion-based post, but I personally find that, in regards to the action-scenes of The Legend of Korra, the "choreography" of the fight-scenes, as well as the order in which the fight-scenes take place, is poorly done in this show. Many epic fight-scenes happen too early in the series, or certain "moves" performed by the characters are done with such ease that the audience grows numb to acts of authentic skill. Thus, whenever a truly impressive "move" is pulled off in a fight-scene, the effect is lessened.

Questions to be answered in this post:
Does action-scene "choreography" really matter? Is "fight-scene sequencing" actually important for keeping fans interested? Are fans "numbed" by watching too many epic battles before the battles of ultimate significance take place?

  • I don't know if this article does a good enough job of presenting specifics and explaining WHY the choreography itself in Legend of Korra falls short. This article speaks more to a gap between what certain audience members expect from fight scenes and the way in which the first two seasons did not play into those expectations. For example, when Korra and Amon first square off, an audience member might expect that this is the climax of the season and be disappointed when the fight does not match up to expectations of a climactic fight scene like Aang and Ozai. This scene, however, is NOT the climax of the season: Korra going into the Avatar state is. Meanwhile, Amon is an anticlimactic villain. As it turns out he is just a blood bender and does not deserve the same epic showdown that Ozai did. In short, the choreography is important to an extent but the show focuses more on plot and theme than fighting: a philosophy which is consistent with the show's commitment that violence should be seen as a secondary option. – Cmandra 2 years ago
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  • The original series had a more cinematic "ancient martial arts" feeling but I really enjoyed the way the choreography felt in Korra. It seems to have evolved from ancient martial arts techniques as the original show displayed and becomes more of modern style. This is emphasized in the bending competitions where the bending feels like a boxing or UFC match. Everything about the sequel series is rooted in industrialization which means that the bending also progresses in technique and efficiency. Its truly difficult to argue your point, I'm afraid, as the information might require visual proof. The bending, in the show, does appear seamless even to younger or newer Benders, but if you think about the level that bending education has evolved from the almost primitive feeling of the original show, it mostly explains why the characters have improved in talent. – consciouskyle 2 years ago
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  • I appreciate that Korra had the brute strength that Aang did not. Korra was intentionally this way to break gender stereotypes and give you more varied women. Between Katara, Toph, Lin, Korra, and Asami there are so many different and amazing types of women that the enhanced fighting does not phase me because /that's Korra/. – alexpaulsen 2 years ago
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  • Fight scenes cannot be underestimated in importance. A really great fight scene has an element of surprise. Think back to Monkey Kingdom where the witch uses her hair to sling around the enemies' neck and strangles them with a jerk of her head, or Matrix where Neo flies off. I loved Legend of Korra but am forced to agree with you regarding the fight scenes. – Munjeera 1 year ago
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  • I didn't notice too significant a drop in fight scene choreography. If you're correct, it might be due to the fact that Korra is set in a technology advanced future where mech-suits do a lot of the fighting. This could even be a comment on the way technology distances us from our past/traditions? Seems a bit heavy handed however – Rayna 1 year ago
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anime

Bleach: The Hollowfication Question

Ichigo Kurosaki from the anime Bleach gets thrown down a path of violence, death, and corruption. But it is a path he believes that he must take if he wants to protect his friends. The path he chooses though is a road littered with enemies. With each enemy seeming to be more powerful than the one preceding it, Ichigo continuously needs to become stronger.

Each time he grows stronger, however, the source of his power becomes darker, and he soon realizes that his soul is partially possessed by an evil spirit—his inner Hollow. The presence of his inner Hollow burdens him, so much that he almost loses control of his body, and meanwhile, he is suddenly faced with an incredibly powerful foe. As a result, Ichigo doesn’t know what other method to turn to, other than by controlling and using his inner Hollow to boost his power.

Is it logical for the hero of a story to use or join sides with evil in order to bring about a desired good. Or does this confuse society, and make the line between good and evil too blurry? And most importantly, is it moral to use an evil means to meet a just end?

  • Ah, that definitely is a colorful type of discussion.Good & Evil, work hand in hand. They need to exist for the other to as well. Within this article it "literally" works together. – ChrissyC 2 years ago
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  • I think this makes the line a little blurry because from the perspective of the reader whatever side the hero joins is the good side. So that makes it more confusing to the reader about which side in the conflict is truly good or evil. I think though that the ends justify the means, if we are able to create peace through one large final conflict than I think the world needs the conflict. – Dandylion 2 years ago
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  • I've always liked the blurring of the lines in Bleach as it pertains to Ichigo's Hollow side. It helps provide a balance between good and evil, and in doing so helps Ichigo become a more 'complete' character. Were he simply a boy who did what was right with no darker side to play off, he would seem far more dull I think. Am enjoyable article. – mattdoylemedia 2 years ago
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  • Honestly the lines between good and evil should be blurred more often. In many shounen anime and manga the lines never get blurred. The fact that Ichigo is fighting with his inner evil and might end up in the "evil" category is a very good story. Also, it would be a great character arc to see him go through. – Animegirlinglasses 2 years ago
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  • Manga can often be very narrow in its depiction of good and evil. I believe Ichigo's inability to control his hollow is partly due to his unwillingness to accept that it is a genuine part of him. – Jiraiyan 2 years ago
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  • I think disregarding the end justifies the means is a little too easy. I think the statement means something more like "The end result produced so much good, that the evil results of the means are outweighed. So in the example, one man being super wealthy is really good or bad. I suppose it's good for the guy and his family, but because he stole and hurt so many people the end does not justify the means. The means created more harm than the end caused good. So if the character in the manga does a lot of good and there is little harm from using the hallow, then yes the end justifies the means. But on the other hand if the hallow took him over and destroyed the world.... that'd be a different story. – Tatijana 2 years ago
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  • Tatijana: I understand where your argument is coming from. It's very close to consequentialism, in which the morality of an action is weighed based upon the consequences that take effect as a result of the action. However, consequentialism is a messed up moral-theory because it disregards the objectivity of morality; it takes away Truth. Consequentailism says that doing something bad can bring about a greater good. But that's a flawed way to approach the subject of morality. It devalues the idea of right or wrong and reduces moral objectivity to a set of consequences that result from an action. Actions made should be based on conscience and Natural Law, even though those both have some flaws too.The loophole, you might be interested to know, is provided by the Principle of Double Effect. Ichigo's actions still don't qualify for this, but allow me to explain. The requirements for the Principle of Double Effect to take action are 1) the action of the person must be good or indifferent. 2) the person must have good intentions. 3) the evil effect cannot be the means to the good effect. d) the good effect must balance the evil effect.Once again, this is just a loophole, and overall, Ichigo's predicament is quite messy insofar as morality applies. Great discussion and please comment if you want to take this further! – Dominic Sceski 2 years ago
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Latest Comments

Dominic Sceski

Hey, maybe I’m just that good? :p

Hmm, okay, thank you for the tip. I can see what you’re saying. I have a blog that I try to keep up with, so sometimes my articles here can sound a little “bloggy”.

I’m glad you liked it! Thank you!

Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood: The Symbolic and Ironic Deaths of the Homunculi
Dominic Sceski

Absolutely, Arakawa is a genius. I have a confession to make: I used to be rather sexist when it came to story telling; I used to believe that male writers were better than female writers. I am happy to say that Arakawa completely changed my mind, especially since FMA is one of the greatest stories I have ever encountered. Cheers!

Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood: The Symbolic and Ironic Deaths of the Homunculi
Dominic Sceski

Having an androgynous or male Lust would definitely add an interesting twist to the symbolism. Men are lustful and seductive too, oftentimes in more sinister ways than women. I wouldn’t call a female Lust outdated however…perhaps lacking creativity, if anything. I would still consider it fitting to have a female Lust, as women are historically and naturally more beautiful than men, and thus their powers of sensual allurement are greater.

On the note of Christian moralizing, something else that Arakawa does to enrich FMA is draw from many different religions and cultures. There are Christian themes, but also Islamic, Western, and Eastern themes also. As a Catholic Christian, I appreciated the fact that the enemies were named after well-known sins. This was one of the reasons why I was so inspired to write about this, and I hope that can at least be understood, if not appreciated.
Thank you for your thoughtful comment! Cheers!

Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood: The Symbolic and Ironic Deaths of the Homunculi
Dominic Sceski

By far, that is the greatest compliment I have received! I’m glad you were able to take something away from this, or feel moved by it.

Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood: The Symbolic and Ironic Deaths of the Homunculi
Dominic Sceski

Yes, I totally agree with you. Having watched the 2003 version of Fullmetal Alchemist first, I was surprised that Pride was actually Sileam. It was a huge plot twist that I really enjoyed!

Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood: The Symbolic and Ironic Deaths of the Homunculi
Dominic Sceski

My favorite is definitely Pride!

Fullmetal Alchemist Brotherhood: The Symbolic and Ironic Deaths of the Homunculi
Dominic Sceski

I’m gonna have to check out death parade now! I love anime that brings up big questions.

Death Parade: Humanity in Yuzuru Tachikawa's Anime
Dominic Sceski

Everyone likes Loki…but, because of his wit, and the natural, “light-hearted” feel of Marvel, he can lack the darkness that people expect in an antagonist.

The Marvel Cinematic Villains: What Makes a Memorable Antagonist?