Blogging

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How Blogging Can be a Great Escape

Analysis of how using a blogging platform can free the mind and creativity, as well as potentially even releasing writer’s block. Open to any other thoughts on where to take this.

  • I like this, but I would suggest a little clarification. What does it mean to "free the mind" and what is the advantage for writers? Can you find any concrete examples (i.e. quotes, statistics, examples of authors) that either support or do not support blogging as beneficial for writer's block? I think this could be a useful article for young writers. – Eden 1 year ago
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  • I agree with Eden that this needs to be more fully outlined, especially as there are many blogs used for a range of purpose, are you advocating the process of blogging about writing or just doing a blog in general? This is an interesting suggestion but obviously difficult to measure. – SaraiMW 1 year ago
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  • Since I won't be the one writing it, I decided to leave it up to whoever decides to, and let them have free reign on it. Sorry if it sounds kind of floppy, but I wasn't sure how to go about it. – sophiebernard 1 year ago
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  • I began blogging to release all the anxious thoughts that were piling up in my head. I found it much more cathartic than simply writing it in a notebook because submitting something to the internet makes it feel as though that thing has been taken out of your hands and released to strangers forever. – veritygrace 1 year ago
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  • A good idea-probably requires some theme, where the writing develops around some central issue or theme so readers see how it expands. – Joseph Cernik 1 year ago
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  • For whoever takes this, I might also suggest thinking about the social aspect of blogging. How might this help--or complicate things if someone lacks confidence or is shy when engaging with others online? – Emily Deibler 12 months ago
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  • I would recommend as a blogger myself discussing how blogging creates a community and an ability to network as well, which can catalyse this 'escape' – waveofsalt 12 months ago
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  • Do you mean blogging as in writing about day to day life for the world to read? Or do you mean blogging as in writing about one's passion? If you elaborate more on your view, it would help bring this piece together. – Dena Elerian 8 months ago
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Does Blogging Really Help Promote Self-Publishers?

Analyze whether or not blogging is truly effective in the endeavors of self-published authors to promote their books. Does blogging actually help, or are self-publishers just wasting their time? Is it possible to stand out in the blogging world when so many people blog?

  • I think this is an interesting topic. Might I suggest reaching out to mark@markmanson.net. He managed to turn his blogging career into a book and might have some interesting perspectives on the topic. – derBruderspielt 3 years ago
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  • Quite helpful – AdamCinder 3 years ago
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  • I'd also be interested to know how true to life the film 'Julia and Julie' is and whether the implications within, of a first time blogger that reaches literary success, has influenced more people to follow this path. The list of New York Times top blogs is probably an aim form many people. – SaraiMW 3 years ago
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Blogging: Help or Hinderance in Building a Writing Career?

Many writing help sites suggest that starting a blog can launch your writing career. Others suggest that spending too much time tending a blog can stunt your literary growth in terms of productivity. So where do you draw the line? Is there a way to manage both or should a fledgling writer focus solely on writing the stories they want to write?

  • A big part of the question might come down to a matter of "why buy the cow when you get the milk for free?" For those who attempt to make their living as a writer, is it in their best interest to put time and effort into writing free online content with the hopes that it may prompt readers to buy their professionally published works? In the past, if professional [let's say, fiction] writers wanted to supplement their bodies of work with additional nonfiction, polemical, or personal writings, their only outlets to share them with the world were the same kinds of standard publishing channels - such as newspapers, magazines, periodicals, or to compile essays and articles into whole new books - to which they were still promised monetary compensation. Nowadays, with the internet acting as a Wild West of free content bombarding us from all directions, blogging has become a way for authors to share their nonfiction/polemical/personal content without any expectation of payment (at least when starting out). The consequences to this are two-fold: 1) the writer is no longer able to sustain herself financially from the total sum of her literary output, and 2) the free work produced may be somewhat de-legitimized in contrast to that which has entered the book market, possibly taking the author's good name down with it. At the end of the day, I think it's beneficial for writers to work on their craft beyond the occasional book she is able to produce, but incentivizing this work financially should be a priority if we wish to cultivate a future in which writers can devote themselves fully to their art without fearing that they may not be able to pay this month's rent. – ProtoCanon 4 years ago
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  • Everything is helpful... until it's not. There are myriad number of reasons for writing and the choices of mediums ever expanding. Digital literacies have brought about their own challenges. Let the suit be cut according to the cloth, as my dad always said. – Munjeera 4 years ago
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  • I agree with ProtoCanon that the internet has a Wild West atmosphere for fledgling writers and authors. There is potential for writers to share their work and connect with like-minded individuals. It might have the potential for fame like all the people who have found fame through YouTube and social media. At the same time, traditional means of publication through journals, online and print, shouldn't be discounted. You can build up a resume of sorts through these publications if you're ever looking for an agent. The internet is definitely changing the way things are done, so it'll be interesting to see what happens. – S.A. Takacs 4 years ago
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  • An interesting topic, yet one that needs to be considered on an individual basis. There are those who blog to get "discovered." Some sites encourage you to use their platform as a means to "launch your career as a writer." While others blog because they promised themselves that they would write, for at least a said amount of time, every day. Those looking for success or discovery will likely be disappointed. As for the disciplined writer who seeks to fine tune his or her craft, this act with be a help, not a hindrance to their art of writing. – danielle577 4 years ago
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How blogging changes the human language

Blogging can be seen as today’s vernacular. But how is it changing the way we write and story tell? How does blogging compare to "proper" writing in the sense of how people understand language today? This piece would require a commentary on whether someone thinks blogging is beneficial or not for storytelling and learning through writing.

  • Talk about different types of blogs. People use blogs to document specific times in their life like a diary (example: NaNoWriMo) whereas others use blogs to display their stories and/or articles. – JennyCardinal 4 years ago
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  • The one thing that comes to mind: published stories are to blogging what Latin used be to vernacular languages. I think that blogging is valuable, because it opens discussions to audiences who were otherwise not part of important conversations. Of course, this is not the case for each and every blog (as JennyCardinal mentioned), but it seems to me that there is a 'universalizing' or 'democratizing' feature to blogging that does not exist in more traditional storytelling venues. In terms of storytelling, blogging certainly transfers ownership from fewer authors to many. Microcosms of society can even form around bloggers, which I always found amazing. Is it beneficial, though? I can't help but think it is, in that language will evolve no matter what, that it takes the form of blogging circumstantial. Even if bloggers adopt their own language to which only a few people are privy to, there is a similar phenomenon in specialized disciplines like medicine and law anyway. – mghio165 4 years ago
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How has Blogging Changed Writing and Publishing?

Hyperbole and a Half. Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir. Humans of New York. Even Dog Shaming. All of these are blogs turned into books—although some are more successful than others. What makes for a successful transition from blog to book? How has this changed publishing (for better or worse)? Should prospective writers be writing in blogs, in the hopes of building an audience base and working towards a book deal? Or is this a fad that will play itself out?

  • This would be a great article I'd love to read. I'm sure lots of people on this site would like to know whether writing on a blog is worth it and if it would in fact get them and audience or book deal? Research the stories of the aforementioned blogs and rate how successful each was, why, and how they could have gotten more popular. Are they getting book deals or just self-publishing? What markets are being targeted? – Slaidey 5 years ago
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  • I am interested in the relationship between creative and commercial endeavors when it comes to blogging, writing and publishing (particularly as a blogger and aspiring author myself). This subject material is definitely relevant and that's why I decided to comment on it -- intriguing stuff, for sure! – emich13 5 years ago
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  • There are so many bloggers out there right now, that it does take a specific writer with a specific writing style who writes a specific topic in order to stand out. It's literally like trying to find a needle in a haystack or rather, a writer in a pile of writers. – kennylim 5 years ago
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