Millennials

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The Rise of Hyper-Realism

There seems to be a growing trend in millennial produced cinema and television to take real life experiences and events and bring them to the screen (Girls, Master of None, Mr. Roosevelt, Lady Bird, and more, are based closely on the writer’s real life). While many of these works are widely acclaimed, is there a downside to this style of filmmaking? Can we continue to pull out unique insights from films that represent life as we know it? Or is fantasy more effective? What is it about seeing something essentially identical to our lives or our friends/families lives that stands out to us?

  • A good topic and good questions. I'd like to see this essay. – Joseph Cernik 2 years ago
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  • Interesting. I think part of the discussion needs to be about whether photography is, in and of itself, about “realism”. It’s a well-worn point to make, but Picasso’s “Guernica” can be argued to feel a more “realistic” expression of the visceral horror of the Spanish Civil War than many photographs. And if the “realism” of photographs lies significantly in the medium’s ability to capture a fleeting and ephemeral moment, does that change when the fleeting, ephemeral moment is artfully and skilfully staged? (Or, indeed, reproduced, as in much of the photo-realistic art on Ivan Terzic’s blog; as you quite rightly remind us, photo-realism is not the sole preserve of the 2D or 3D digital arts) I understand completely the attraction of photo-realism, particularly in archaeological reconstructions. After all, photo-realism is primarily about detail, and some of the data which archaeology captures is highly – even microscopically – detailed. But does “data-detail” really equate to “visual detail” or “representational detail”? And do we really understand the past in terms of the hyper-detailed snapshot – the moment frozen in time? Or do we actually understand the past in terms more like a tracking shot, moving spatially and temporally across an archaeological landscape, with objects, events and the relationships between them slipping in and out of focus? If the latter, then perhaps the practice of “photo-realism” needs to be blended much more into a continuum of representational techniques. – NikaGoddard 2 years ago
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  • I think this is a great topic as there are many ways to tackle the questions you've left for us to think about. I think people feel validated when they see pieces of their own realities played out before audiences. They might also feel compassion because some director and team of writers thought a story much like their own was worthy of a budget and cast etc. Watching our stories told through film also brings freedom because it allows others to get closer to our own experiences in a way that spares us judgment. I hope this is helpful in some way. – MadaleneArias 2 years ago
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  • well films like lady bird (i.e. coming of age films) have been here for decades. coming of age will probably never die in hollywood due to how its the most relatable thing to portray on film – jayjayhutch 2 years ago
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  • None of the works you mention are outstanding in any way. I find older millennials' work to be banal at best vulgar and trite. Ladybird was an average film. Millennials don't have that ingenious magic that Gen X directors and writers do, imagination and fabulous story such as the great Wes Anderson's and P.T. Anderson's works to name 2 of so many great Gen -X directors. So I find this topic boring. There is no millenial work mentioned of great consequence; I can't think of any. Perhaps changing the topic to Great Gen X directors would be fascinating!:) – youngmollflanders 1 year ago
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Millennials And Art: What Types of Art Can We Hope to See?

Millennials are typically regarded by the older generations as entitled and cynical. Personally, I come from the millennial generation, and resent the idea that we are entitled and cynical without reason or cause. I just completed a class discussing changes and experimentation in literature during the Modernist era from 1900-1945 in America specifically. What I would hope to inspire from this topic is to circumvent the allegations that Millennials are entitled, perhaps showcase some artwork from Millennial artists or authors, and perhaps even speculate on what a historian might dub the period of artistry created by Millennials

  • Don't be discouraged by people criticizing Millennial. BTW my tablet keeps correcting my writing of millennial from plural to singular. I can tell you as someone who has worked with Baby Boomers all my life that they are not a group who should be shutting down the next generation. In fact since the 80s, the Boomers have been getting richer and richer to keep wealth in the top 1%. Ironic that the same generation that fought for many egalitarian ideas has become the exact opposite of their ideals. I would just think every time the older generation criticizes Millennial that it is just an expression of their guilty social conscience. Sellout much? – Munjeera 4 years ago
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  • This is a good topic, so don't degrade it by getting political and start blaming others (especially other generations). Stay on topic and keep it moving forward in a positive manner. Simply and clearly state "why" Millennials are not cynical or entitled and then give evidence of this through the artwork they have produced. – bergland 4 years ago
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  • Munjeera, contradiction alert: if boomers are hoarding wealth, I'm pretty sure they're more than one-percent, so a lot if them aren't getting wealthy. Let's us poor ants quit fighting over one crumb at the bottom of the hill. The problem with every generation is its unwillingness to suffer, let alone die, for what is right. We're all pretty much sheep. – Tigey 4 years ago
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  • I think in the notes we're getting a bit away from the message I originally made, which is what contributions artists specifically from the Millennial generation have or will contribute in the future and what future analysis of those artworks and pieces of literature might look like. It is not taking a jab at Baby Boomers or Generation X or anything of that sort. – Nayr1230 4 years ago
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What do Millennials Want?

A recent NYT article posed the question: What Do Millennials Want in TV? and the only conclusion was that the millennial generation is so diverse that it’s hard to pin down one factor. However, is there a factor that can bring together the millennial generation? Or is it simply too diverse to target as one group?

  • Great topic!!! Whoever can figure out what Millennial enjoy can count on reaching probably the most important group in world history since the Baby Boomers. I am a GenXer but I love this next generation coming up. In my view I think they are diverse but working with them has taught me how incredibly smart, adaptable and sincere they are as a group. I can't wait to see what they accomplish. I have high hopes for the future when I am around Millennial. – Munjeera 4 years ago
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  • Very complex. It is going to be hard to whomever writes about this topic to find the necessary evidence to back up your statements. If you manage to do this it's going to be a wonderful article to read. – Andrestrada 4 years ago
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