EmskitheNerd

Writing and Pop Culture are two of my greatest passions. There's nothing that I love more than combining the two!

Junior Contributor I

  • Lurker
  • ?
  • Articles
    0
  • Featured
    0
  • Comments
    4
  • Ext. Comments
    4
  • Processed
    0
  • Revisions
    0
  • Topics
    1
  • Topics Taken
    1
  • Notes
    4
  • Topics Proc.
    11
  • Topics Rev.
    0
  • Points
    50
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    43
    Sorry, no posts matched your criteria.

    Latest Topics

    4
    Locked

    Sensitive topics made appropriate for kids by Disney

    Lately, Disney and Pixar films have been touching on some deep themes and subject matter that normal children’s films wouldn’t dare approach. Disability as a strength in "Finding Dory," loss and overcoming grief in "Big Hero 6," and self acceptance in "Frozen" to name a few. Why is it beneficial to present such weighty topics to children? How can this positively impact the younger generation?

    • I think by normalizing these tough subjects through the use of fun/beloved characters children can come to their own understanding of mental illness/disability/trauma. Like instead of being a movie about a character who hates herself and who she is doesn't matter, Disney created a character out of Elsa that people (kids and adults alike) can connect to. This humanizes these real-world issues in a way that kids can at least kind of understand, even if the movies don't go too intense on these serious issues. Like, by knowing Dory and how her memory loss impacts her, kids can get to to know the character and love her - with the disability included as just a part of who she is. It doesn't detract from who she is, it's just a part of her and who she is. – Dimitri 1 week ago
      3
    • I agree with what Dimitri has written. The truth is that children these days are becoming more and more accustomed to social media- which means the risk of them seeing these adult topics in an adult fashion is only increasing. Showing it to them in a kid-friendly way- with heroes that they can be inspired by and look up to- is a great way of broaching the topic and perhaps even starting a discussion about it. It also helps that more and more female heroes are being introduced into these movies- now both boys and girls have someone they can look up to! – Thenoshman 1 week ago
      0
    • Love this topic! Children are a lot smarter than we give them credit for, and I think Disney has made some great choices in the topics they choose to present, as well as the way they are presented. I just might grab this one... :) – Stephanie M. 6 days ago
      0
    • This is a great topic, Disney have done some really great things in helping children understand topics that are quite difficult to express to them. As an adult, I find some of the films heartbreaking but an important lesson for all the children watching while their minds are still developing. – jesschaudhry 3 days ago
      0
    • Really interesting topic and worth exploring. To add a new slant/get the most out of this discussion, I would suggest contrasting the newer 'deep' themes with Disney's original intentions. When he established the company, Walt Disney stated that his films appealed to "that fine, clean, unspoiled spot down deep in every one of us." This aim is evident in a lot of his early, sanitised adaptions of fairy tales, where traditional ideas of female maturity are eschewed in favour of idealising childlike innocence. There's also been a tendency for Disney films to omit darker themes, such as the original endings of Snow White and The Little Mermaid, even though these stories have been told to children to centuries. This newer tendency to depict more emotionally hard-hitting themes is a far cry from Disney's appeal to the "unspoiled spot", but it shows how far the company has come in its time. Now, Disney is willing to adapt to a new age that recognises and explores the difficulties that children are likely to encounter in their lives, instead of just covering them up. – EllyB 3 days ago
      0
    Taken by EllyB (PM) 3 days ago.

    Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

    Latest Comments

    I was drawn to anime in middle school, starting with “Fullmetal Alchemist.” I had never seen such brutality, action, and sorrow in an animated tv series before, and that was just the first episode! I think that another reason that people have begun to embrace anime is because it is unafraid to push boundaries and it introduces new stories. There are numerous genres to choose from and countless anime series in each genre, so there is always something to suit everyone’s different tastes. The stories that different series tell are also unique and original; these are not plots that have been done to death or rehashed over and over. It’s an animated experience that can appeal to the older generation, as well as to those with a more eclectic, mature taste.

    Why Western Culture is Beginning to Embrace Anime

    I was drawn to anime in middle school, starting with “Fullmetal Alchemist.” I had never seen such brutality, action, and sorrow in an animated tv series before, and that was just the first episode! I think that another reason that people have begun to embrace anime is because it is unafraid to push boundaries and it introduces new stories. There are numerous genres to choose from and countless anime series in each genre, so there is always something to suit everyone’s different tastes. The stories that different series tell are also unique and original; these are not pots that have been done to death or rehashed over and over. It’s an animated experience that can appeal to the older generation, as well as to those with a more eclectic, mature taste.

    Why Western Culture is Beginning to Embrace Anime

    It doesn’t take a genius to find that perfect blend of humor and drama in a film. The blend is obvious in such Sandler films as “50 First Dates,” “Mr. Deeds,” and “Big Daddy.” He also has a few other gems that are heavily saturated with raunchy or ridiculous humor, but bring about an emotional gut punch at the perfect moment to give the film some definite heart. Consider if you will “Click” and “Eight Crazy Nights.”

    Cinema Cynicism: The Ballad of Adam Sandler

    I absolutely loved this article. This is a subject that I feel incredibly passionate and have also written about in the past. When you mentioned the ability to play as both a hero and a villain in the Star Wars games gave me an idea. What about a game where the character you play as is both hero and villain? Consider if you will “Star Wars: The Force Unleashed”. The main character, Starkiller, goes through the majority of the first game murdering Jedi and committing other evil acts at the behest of his master, Darth Vader. Vader abducted him as a child and trained him to be a ruthless Sith. He is then betrayed by Vader and realizes that he was never meant to be a Sith Lord, but a Jedi Knight himself. The second half of the first game and its sequel show that he has assumed the role of the protagonist (or, possibly, the anti-hero). Though he was trained by the Dark Side, he was cast aside because he also had Light in him.

    Antagonist-Centered Stories: What Can We Learn?