SophIsticated

SophIsticated

Musician, fantasy author, abstract concept.

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Latest Topics

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Whitewashing In Films And TV Shows - Is There Really An Excuse?

Recently, there have been more and more movies aiming to tell more racially diverse stories, many of which have been historical events omitted or ignored in the past due to discrimination, for example 12 Years A Slave (2013). However, many films are still criticised for ‘whitewashing’, the term for casting white actors in historically non-white character roles, with African Americans, Native Americans, and Asians experiencing this the most. The argument most commonly used for this is that the actors are ‘better qualified for the role’, however the truth behind this is often that directors often choose actors of similar backgrounds. Recent shows and movies that have come under backlash for their casting include the new Power Rangers film, the Death Note adaption, and Ghost In The Shell (2017). There are certainly far less Latino, Asian, or African American actors than there are Caucasian, but is there really so few that none are good enough for these POC roles?

  • Intermingling of cultures has ALWAYS existed.But, how about making movies about diverse people in those time periods? At that point, diverse groups of people existed in the world but their histories are ignored by many in the West.The latest Tarzan reboot actually had a storyline rooted in history called George Washington Williams who did travel to the Free Congo to protest slavery in that region. A very intelligent weaving of history and fiction.I think the problem is when Hollywood rewrites history to a very Western view which detracts from revealing that we all have so much more in common than we think we do. – Munjeera 4 months ago
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  • I think the question starts with who is making the movies; who is crafting the stories? We need more POC/minorities/women producing/directing movies. – tamarakot 4 months ago
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The Interactions Between the Film Composer and the Director - Making the Music Match the Movie

Music is a crucial part in creating and enhancing the mood, themes and overall atmosphere of a movie, and without it, many of the popular films we know and love would have a completely different feeling. However, the interaction between the composer and the director can often be very scarce, even close to nonexistent. Indeed, the composer can receive the movie after everything has been completed, and with only a few weeks to create the entire score so that it fits perfectly with each scene. On the other end of the spectrum, the director may send sections of the movie to the composer at a time, meaning that making the musical connections of each part of the movie and tying themes together can be a near nightmare for the composer. How exactly does all of this pushing and pulling manage to come together to create the masterpieces that we see on screen?

  • This would certainly be fascinating to write about as the soundtrack can greatly enhance the impact of certain films looking at composers like John Williams with countless films and even a more contemporary form of composition like with Arcade Fire in Her. I think the collaboration aspect of it is also very important to consider when creating the entire piece. Nice topic, would love to see it brought to life. – Callum Logie 5 months ago
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  • Really interesting topic, as soundtracks can make or break a film in my opinion. The importance of music in film is definitely underestimated. Most great movies have great music. – Charlie 5 months ago
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Latest Comments

SophIsticated

Superhero films have become more and more popular in recent years, but they would likely be more of a subgenre than their own individual subject. Perhaps eventually, if they continue to dominate the film world, they could evolve into a more unique structure of their own.

Super Heroes films as Genre Films
SophIsticated

It is difficult to find a balance between allowing children to roam freely and do as they please, yet understand the boundaries of society and know when it is necessary to follow rules or a stricter structure. It is all well and good to give a child the world, but they must also know how to appropriately use what they have when the situation calls for it.

Free Play: The Social, Cognitive & Emotional Pay Offs of Allowing Whimsicality
SophIsticated

The evolution of horror movies is quite interesting in the way writers need to keep updating their ideas in order to fit the changing and developing world. After all, the scare factor of a movie becomes much bigger when the situation is relatable and feels like something that could actually happen to the viewer in real life.

New Horror: An Evolving Genre
SophIsticated

The way in which Rey is still mostly a blank slate is quite useful for future films and for development of the plot, and I also think perhaps this vagueness of her background and history is a perfect strategy for keeping interest in the Star Wars franchise (not necessarily for the long term fans, but for those recently interested who are more likely to forget it after too long without new content), and allows for plenty of fan theories and discussions that keep Star Wars fresh in the minds of potential Han Solo and Episode 8 audiences.

Star Wars: Who is Rey (And Why Do We Care)?
SophIsticated

Morality systems in games are always interesting in the ways that they are implemented. It is incredibly easy to make them irritating or effectively useless for the players, but a well made one can be a great asset to a game.

Video Games and Morality: The Question of Choice
SophIsticated

This is a really good reminder in regards to not trying to force myself to write an entire work straight away. I often expect myself to have an idea, immediately start writing, and not stop until I’ve finished the entire book, all in one go. This nearly always ends up with a folder of documents on my laptop containing 5-10 chapters each, or however much I managed to achieve before I lost motivation or interest. I can be far too much of a perfectionist, and if the words don’t come out properly the first time, they tend to never end up coming out at all. These are definitely useful points and advice.

Creating a Writing Habit that Works: Muses, Magic and Faith
SophIsticated

The main thing I like about CW’s The Flash is the fact that it’s so light hearted. It’s certainly not the show to turn to when looking for a serious, action packed, fate-of-the-world dependent plot (although there are certainly points where that kind of atmosphere seems to be attempted), but it is a great relief from the shows that, while providing the intensity that is often needed to create a truly suspenseful and captivating show, also tend to create cliffhangers at every corner, and end up killing off or destroying the lives of the characters you love. Sure, this is perfect for a shows popularity, but sometimes all you want is a storyline that doesn’t aim to crush your heart completely every episode.

"The Flash" as the Modern Equivalent of 1960's "Batman"
SophIsticated

I have studied Poe and the Cask of Amontillado in depth in the past, however this article truly provides a focused, detailed analysis of the story, one which I have found to chill most readers, including myself.

Terror and Horror in Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado"