ChristelleMarie Chua

ChristelleMarie Chua

Rutgers undergrad with a tailored major for interactive storytelling. Writer of all sorts, proud genderqueer Pinxy Pioneer.

Junior Contributor III

  • Lurker
  • Pssst
  • Sharp-Eyed Citizen
  • ?
  • Articles
    2
  • Featured
    1
  • Comments
    24
  • Ext. Comments
    10
  • Processed
    6
  • Revisions
    4
  • Topics
    5
  • Topics Taken
    0
  • Notes
    6
  • Topics Proc.
    4
  • Topics Rev.
    3
  • Points
    364
  • Rank
    X
  • Score
    199

Latest Articles

Latest Topics

11
Published

The Potential of Classic Parodies -- Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, a book and now a film parodying Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, playfully recycles Elizabeth Bennet’s story into a quirky — perhaps campy — tale that is more digestible for wide audiences. The parody references famous lines and scenes from the original, humoring those who have read and adored the book. Additionally, it opens up the less accessible media of ‘classic novel’ to a 21st century audience, hopefully piquing their interest in something they would never have considered before. Books like "Texts from Jane Eyre" and others rehash the favorite characters of English majors, but perhaps also open up older literature to young people only attracted to the young adult fiction section.

Are these tactics effective to opening up classics to a new generation? What is the effect of adding zombies to a story such as Pride and Prejudice? How do well-read critics of classics take to these parodies?

  • On the flipside the writer could also talk about taking more contemporary work and making it seem classic like how they wrote Star Wars like a Shakespeare play. – Jaye Freeland 2 years ago
    5
  • It could lead to some interest, but it would be uncertain whether these zombie version of classics would lead to reading the original. I think it depends on whether these parodies emphasize the theme or strengths of the classics or simply have fun by writing zombie stories in unlikely setting. – idleric 2 years ago
    3
  • What a fun topic! I know that my teenage sisters were prompted to read the original P&P after the release of P&P&Z. One might address how people love to "get it;" these new parody books are not only entertaining on their own, but might lead to reading the original just so that one "gets" the parody. – sophiacatherine 2 years ago
    2
  • Literary webseries are less quirky but seem to share the goal of getting younger people interested in older stories. I have little interest in reading classics like Pride & Prejudice, Emma, and Mansfield Park, but I feel like I know and enjoy the stories of those classics because of The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, Emma Approved, and From Mansfield with Love. Shakespearean adaptations like Nothing Much To Do and Shakes: The Town's the Thing do the same thing: the bard's timeless stories in plain, modern English. Perhaps this is a little outside the scope of this topic, or perhaps P&P&Z isn't quite broad enough and a writers needs some more more material to flesh out an article (no pun intended). – noahspud 1 year ago
    2
0

Hatoful Boyfriend: Emotional Bird Dating

Hatoful Boyfriend is a visual novel with a twist — you are the last human on earth, and you attend a school for gifted birds. The goal in the game: get a bird lover. Hatoful Boyfriend seems, at first, gimmicky. It subverts the typical storyline of dating sims by adding talking birds. However, the game can quickly become emotional, mysterious, and even heart wrenching. Hatoful Boyfriend, with its amusing surface, can introduce the genre of visual novel to those previously unfamiliar with it. It has also set a precedent in the visual novel genre to create stories that expand on and add oddity to the typical high school setting.

  • First of all... I'm amazed someone is talking about Hatoful Boyfriend. When looked at in the right light it certainly seems to be a critique of dating sims. It would be interesting to look at how it is received... I tend to find it is used as satire amongst the people who have shown me it. I wonder if everyone perceives it that way though. – LondonFog 2 years ago
    0
3

The Legality of Fanwork

There’s a lot of controversy among fans of many media as to whether the buying and selling of fanwork, art, fiction, and other marketables using the intellectual property of the main author, is legal and/or moral. Is selling character redrawings, spinoff doujinshi, etc. for profit considered stealing? If it is illegal, how can the original artist protect their work? Can art and media based off a preexisting character or universe be considered high art? Consider the relationship most Renaissance paintings have with the Bible. Can that be considered ‘fan art?’

  • You could also consider Bleedman and his Powerpuff Girl Dojinshi comics and Grom Adventures comics, both of which are quite popular. – Adnan Bey 2 years ago
    0
  • This is a very interesting topic, but I think it might be a good idea to narrow down the work to a degree. For example, fitting different forms of art into one article maybe too large of an undertaken. The visual arts category itself is huge. I think one approach maybe to see how artists of the Renaissance protected themselves in comparison to the system we have today in western societies. – Arazoo Ferozan 2 years ago
    0
5

The Future of Nintendo

Nintendo, the trailblazer for video games, has reported to be falling short in comparison to Sony and Microsoft. Most of Nintendo’s successes are derived from old franchises: Fire Emblem, Legend of Zelda, and Mario. Thus, their success is fueled by the nostalgia of older gamers. Notably, they’ve fallen short in the expansion of certain franchises, such as Metroid. However, Nintendo’s latest success, Splatoon, shows the company’s potential versatility. How can Nintendo generate interest in new crowds? How will the company’s transfer to mobile gaming and the new console, the NX, affect them? What steps should Nintendo take to expand their fanbase?

  • It does seem like a good topic. There is potential for Nintendo to make a comeback in the console industry. The Wii, for instance, is still notable for keeping Nintendo up and running but with the rise of the Virtual Reality sets of both Sony and Microsoft, there is also the aspect to consider of how Nintendo can adapt to the changing climate of the console industry.However, like SEGA, there is also potential for Nintendo as a software entity. SEGA's titles are up for grabs on both Sony and Microsoft, and although by saying this I am committing the single vilest heresy of 90s era retro gaming, I think that Nintendo's NX may even prove to be an interesting experiment for Nintendo to have an arsenal of SEGA Games.Either way, the potential for Nintendo can improve if they realize:1) the current gaming generation wants graphics, and there isn't a significant majority who put importance to story or character development (With some notable and important exceptions. Onimusha, Gears of War, God of War, DMC (the original PS2 series), Ways of the Samurai, Shadow of the Colossus, and Halo for instance.)2) the current gaming generation wants a game that is playable yet adaptable: it thinks outside the box rather than use tricks from that box. Citing some examples from my list: God of War had the approach of interactive cutscenes with a system of weapon improvement that was dynamic - a step up from the DMC or FF style of upgrading; likewise, Gears of War had the gameplay aspect (which was sufficiently difficult) combined with a good story that helped sell it.3) the current gaming generation will need... if all else fails... pleasure for the pervs. :P I dare anyone to mention one game from 2014 onward on the consoles (PS4, PS3, XBox 360) THAT DIDN'T HAVE SEXUALISATION IN IT! This is why Nintendo is having a hard time as well - their games are for a generation which respected the importance of imagination as well as a blank slate approach to gaming - its fun, but its challenging as well, with a strong and resonant feeling once the game has been concluded. In this respect, the only games I can think off which fulfills these criteria are Onimusha, Shadow of the Colossus, Spartan: Total Warrior, Halo, and even Final Fantasy 7 and 8.I hope this note was helpful. :) – shehrozeameen 2 years ago
    1
4

Interactive Game Figures, Their Impact on the Industry

Skylanders, Disney Infinity, Lego Dimensions, and Amiibos — all are variations of the new phenomenon in gaming, interactive game figures. Skylanders and Disney Infinity have been around for years, creating new starter packs and new figures to expand their 50 collection of figures. Lego Dimensions creates a new spin on the IGF concept, creating a base game that will last for the next 5 years and additional packs to assemble to add more content onto the game. Amiibos, Nintendo’s rendition, are treated more like collectibles, but also add additional bonuses on games across Nintendo franchises.

How does the proliferation of these figures into the industry affect the economy and reputation of the industry? Is it simply an add on to the discourse of microtransactions? Which company implements their IGFs most effectively?

  • This is an excellent topic, original and so in sync with what is happening in the industry! It will be important of the writer to explain clearly what interactive game figures are as it is complex to grasp. – Rachel Elfassy Bitoun 2 years ago
    1

Sorry, no tides are available. Please update the filter.

Latest Comments

ChristelleMarie Chua

I remember trying to play Graces F and not liking any of the characters or story at all, but enjoying the updated gameplay. Zestiria’s storyline was bearable, but it was the battle style that kept me hooked overall.

Tales of Symphonia's Deconstruction of Self-Sacrifice
ChristelleMarie Chua

I am still wary of the whole vlogging thing — it seems like a normal person can make bank just by being a recorded normal person. I wonder if there are certain personality types that are more favorable for an internet persona.

Vlogging: The New Genre of Television Entertainment
ChristelleMarie Chua

I enjoyed it when I was young, but after the improvements we’ve made on graphics it kind of is frustrating. Bandai keeps releasing new ports of it, when what we really want is a total remake. I suppose the struggle with that is that we’d want all the great voice acting to remain intact.

Tales of Symphonia's Deconstruction of Self-Sacrifice
ChristelleMarie Chua

The 3D art is pretty bad in ToS, but it’s something I forgive in virtue of everything awesome about it. I haven’t played Xilia myself, but I’ve heard it’s a little different in setting than the typical Tales of game and got mixed reviews from the fandom. Personally, I”d go with Tales of Symphonia — it’s an easy favorite.

Tales of Symphonia's Deconstruction of Self-Sacrifice
ChristelleMarie Chua

I agree! The obvious and most enjoyable add-on to the Symphonia world would be to follow the Kharlan Heroes, Kratos, Yuan, Martel, and Mithos. Bandai didn’t do the series justice with the sequel.

Tales of Symphonia's Deconstruction of Self-Sacrifice
ChristelleMarie Chua

I haven’t played Undertale yet, but it certainly is tempting. I read in an article in Gameinformer, however, that a team is working on a 3D remaster of Undertale that will clarify the gender identity of the protagonist. I wasn’t sure what to think about that, since I always thought the ambiguous gender was a deliberate move, not just a stylistic limitation.

Undertale and Social Justice Themes: Is "That" A Human?
ChristelleMarie Chua

Thanks for your comment! Tales of Symphonia was my first JRPG, but I have yet to find one with a story that tops it.

Tales of Symphonia's Deconstruction of Self-Sacrifice
ChristelleMarie Chua

If there’s a flaw in ToS, it’s the battle system, which I wish was a little more nuanced like other Tales of installments. I think there might be a solution in the system options for you. If not, I hope it becomes something you can overlook! The storyline was really excellent.

Tales of Symphonia's Deconstruction of Self-Sacrifice