caedmonmills

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

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    Aftermath of the 80s Renaissance

    Seeing how popular culture is flourishing in the waves of 80’s revival culture with television hits like Stranger Things, movies like Bladerunner 2049, and a new brat pack, how long will this movement last? Is quality entertainment and/or art coming from this movement and what might be the next driving force of popular culture. Will it be another renaissance or a new set of genres?

    • Really interesting topic! Love both Blade Runner and Stranger Things. The soundtrack for Stranger Things is especially interesting with it's synthesized sound. Maybe the renewed interest has to do with the fact the 80s are now old enough to be nostalgic to middle age and older adults, as well as intriguing to young viewers who weren't alive during the time period. – Sean Gadus 1 year ago
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    • I think the study of "nostalgic" movements such as this can be really interesting. I think the key really is that these movements gain traction at a time when audiences are the best mix of younger consumers who view media from before they were born as a novelty, and older consumers experiencing nostalgia for the era. It might be interesting to look at how 80s elements slowly creeped into the mainstream before hitting it's stride - in particular with the introduction of 80s music in Marvel films and action films in general. – Kayleigh Hall 1 year ago
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    Latest Comments

    You’re absolutely right. I should’ve spotted that wording. Thank you so much for the feedback!

    It Follows: Murder v.s. Martyr and the Death of Youth

    The main reason, I believe, that people make claims such as, “anime and american cartoons are not the same thing,” is because, often, passionate people do not want to equate two things with certain differences because they are convinced that, by doing so, they are discrediting the medium in question as a source of quality, specifically if they prefer one over the other. They mistake similar quality with similar structure and purpose.

    Duality of American and Japanese Animation

    I love the heart and direction of this essay. Censorship, in this case, does more harm than good. People need to give kids more credit in their endeavors to discover what they do and do not find interesting. If a kid reads a disturbing book and finds it to be too unpleasant, they will stop reading and not return to it, similar to a child touching a hot pan.

    Scary Stories: In Defense of Horror for Children

    I find it interesting how the music referenced here and the majority of iconic horror music and sound, in a way, serves a purpose outside of the realm of music. There is a level of simplicity that implies that horror music does not increase in effectiveness or quality parallel to an increase in complexity and musical satisfaction which is the case for most music. Instead, the music adopts meaning and substance by attaching itself to a fear or an emotion and then, when experienced, in short bursts, it triggers the attached feeling within the listener. This is similar to the effect of parallel editing in Eisenstein’s soviet montage. It does more than set a tone; it invades the senses as powerfully as an on-screen jump-scare or a devilish plot twist.

    Penderecki and the Sound of Horror