Catherine Conte

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

Junior Contributor III

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

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    The Golden Age of Video Games

    According to my brother, we are on the brink of a "golden age of video games." Analyze the progression of video games from Asteroids to Nintendo 64 to PS1,2,3,4, to all the Xboxes, and then into the future of virtual reality games that you can actively participate in by wearing a type of goggle. Do you feel the next few years will be as promising as he does?

    • It would interesting to understand why the game industry has risen so much and look at the influence of 3D cinema, where the experience needs to be 'complete' for the audience, like a game. TVs are now in 3D too. Have a look at stats on the rise of the demand for video games too. – Rachel Elfassy Bitoun 2 years ago
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    • "There's nowhere to go from the bottom but up," also feels like it's appropriate at this point in time. – Austin 2 years ago
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    • It will be interesting to see where gaming will go. Connecting consoles to the internet changed the way we play. We don't have to sit in the same room or even know each other anymore. Of course, the graphics have gotten much better too, though that might not make the games better, but I'd like to see some speculation or insight into what gaming developers are working on. – S.A. Takacs 2 years ago
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    • What would the roster of golden age video games look like? Who would you put on your top 5? – george 2 years ago
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    • Maybe link it loosely to the how comic book's define their respective ages. Surely, there have been other "golden" ages in Video Games. We should try and demarcate them. Separating by console generation would probably be the best place to at least start. Also need to separate between console, handheld/mobile, PC. – JAKK 2 years ago
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    • A "golden" age of gaming, for some, has already passed. I know there are those who consider the first Nintendo games to be part of the "golden" age, because they were the first - the ground-breakers. I think it is important to first define what you mean by a "golden" age to begin with, and then go from there.What makes a particular age of gaming "golden"? – Caliburnus 2 years ago
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    • This might be the golden age but all I can help but wonder is how companies are charging us for DLC's. Games are getting way more expensive and giving an advantage to those who can spare extra change. – CarlosRodriguez 2 years ago
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    • The golden age of video games were between 2002 till 2011 when half life 2,bioshock and red dead redemption were published – SinaHasani 9 months ago
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    Where is the Reality?

    Scripted television shows have been struggling of late, most especially the sitcom. It used to be that shows lasted for six seasons or more (M*A*S*H with 11 seasons, Friends with 10, Seinfeld with 9, Will and Grace with 8 etc. etc.). These shows were clever and all of which, even a series about nothing (Seinfeld), have had re-runs playing since they went off the air. Now shows follow the same trite scripts: eventually all focusing more on relationships and/or unrealistic story lines. So what could be the solution? Reality shows? No. Even reality shows are not that realistic, having been dramatized by producers to get increased ratings.

    So what can be done? It is important that viewers, especially the young and impressionable, see shows that can be simultaneously entertaining and educational. Television is so popular that it has the power to influence one’s perception of the events of their own life so it is important that at least some of the shows send positive messages and are relatable.

    • Whoever covers this topic should define "reality." Munjeera – Munjeera 2 years ago
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    • I don't think it is clear enough what this topic is. You speak about reality, but then mention sitcoms which aren't necessarily known for their realism. I'm not sure what the focus of this topic is: shows becoming less realistic and more sensationalist, the opportunity for change in television. These are interesting concepts, but I think you need to create a very clear contention, which is not made clear above. – Matthew Sims 2 years ago
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    Published

    Monopoly: Too Real to Play?

    My family cannot play Monopoly. It is not a fun game during which we can laugh and enjoy quality time together. Instead we become cruel, building hotels as quickly as possible and holding vendettas against each other when someone won’t trade/sell a property with us. The desire to win with the most amount of money takes over and we forget about familial loyalty… and the fact that it is just a game.
    But is it?
    Is this a common theme that as soon as someone gets their first property, their first monopoly, builds their first house then hotel, they become more and more like the ruthless investors on Wall Street? Is this healthy or should Monopoly be removed from the shelves of toy stores and relocated to board rooms where said investment bankers can practice their strategies and the rest of society can be safe?

    • While on the one hand, you're not entirely wrong, on the other hand, neither my family or any other I've witnessed playing the game has ever metamorphosed into cruel and greedy people, treating each other in a way they would otherwise not. The way you describe it, your family completely changed personalities once exposed to a game about making the most money: it changed who they were. But is that really how it happens at your house, or are you just exaggerating this account in order to play up the topic for others to write about? Cause this seems a tad extreme and sensationalized if you ask me. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
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    • I have experienced this game as both fun and ruthless. I guess the more important thing is, does your family go back to being fun loving when it's over? Or do they continue to hold grudges after the game is put away? If no grudge is held, I think it might even be beneficial to get out some family angst in a harmless game than in full blown arguments. – Tatijana 2 years ago
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    • Exactly, Tatijana. If Monopoly does not pit people against each other after the fact, then it could serve a great benefit as a cathartic tool, just like how platformer and adventure video-games help me to relax after a stressful day. – Jonathan Leiter 2 years ago
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    • This could be a worthwhile topic although it might be worth looking at other board games as well. – Jordan 2 years ago
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    • I agree with Jordan, a few other board games can cause equal amounts of stress and anger and they all might do so for the same reason. – Austin Bender 2 years ago
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    • I've learned that when games become like that it is time to take out a game everyone can enjoy. Take into consideration how personality clashes with an enjoyable evening. I have been accused of cheating at Pictionary because I draw well. Those people never will play it (one of my favorite games) with me again ;(.Ah well. It doesn't mean artists should be banned from playing. But, to avoid resentment, you just have to find a game that everyone likes. No need for stress. The game "Gloom," I recall, was created for the very purpose of making good things happen. – Candice Evenson 2 years ago
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    Eighteenth Century Lit: Not As Boring As You'd Think

    I have taken a number of courses in Restoration and Eighteenth Century lit, but remember a feeling of dread when I had to take my first one because it sounded so painfully boring. Imagine my surprise when I read the sex heavy plays, poems with many an innuendo (did you know that "to die" does not necessarily mean losing one’s life), and stories with a little bit of everything. It’s time to open people’s eyes to the fact that just because it’s not a modern story does not mean seventeenth and eighteenth century literature is boring!

    There are many approaches to this topic. One can look into the genre of premature ejaculation poems, or into the plays and stories like The Country Wife by William Wycherley, The Lucky Chance by Aprha Behn, and Fantomina by Eliza Haywood.

    • I think the topic is unambiguous. Instead of focusing on the general aspect of how it's not boring, maybe there can be a more specific area to focus on only that doesn't make it boring. This topic can be a little too broad so you want a more specific area to focus on with this topic. – DSantoyo 2 years ago
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    • I agree that this is a bit broad. You could try focusing on a specific subject that is represented in 18th century lit to make it more focused. This topic could also translate well to a "10 Eighteenth Century Novels You Should Read & Why" sort of list. – Marcie Waters 2 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    I (obviously) feel the exact same way! I listen to Jim Dale’s readings constantly and always look forward to Christmas at Hogwarts because everyone is magical in the way that Christmas should be (not just because they are at a school for magic).

    Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences

    I think you misunderstood me. Obviously I think that children can appreciate the story, but what they can’t always do is relate to the desire for family and the love that can be formed between the family that you choose rather than your biological one.
    I agree that the bravery of the trio and their ability to fight for what they love is Rowling’s acknowledgement of the power of children.
    I do not discount anyone who thinks differently. I thought it was clear because of how much I appreciate Rowling’s work.

    Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences

    I had the same experience when I wrote about how Harry Potter has influenced my writing in a draft for my Creative Writing grad school application. My professor told me that no one would take me seriously and the letter would be thrown away as soon as they saw the name Harry Potter. I think it’s so unfortunate that people in academia believe that only books like The Sun Also Rises can be quality literature. If they removed their biases and eradicated the pretentious mindset, they would notice a lot of other amazing works they were missing with their noses so high up in the air.

    Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences

    Prisoner of Azkaban is my favorite as well!
    Also, I found out afterwards that the Rickman quote is wrong :/ but I still like it.

    Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences

    I would need an example of Rowling’s plot holes because I feel that she did a very thorough job tying things together. As for the diversity issue, I can understand why it could be perceived to be troubling, but I genuinely do not think that race was an issue in the traditional sense. After all, she proved the problems with being prejudiced against people who were not a certain way (Pure-bloods vs. Half bloods and Muggle borns). If people seriously want to downgrade the power of her series by counting the number of people representing each race, I think that they are ignoring the point of the stories. We have to look beyond skin color and realize that it is who we are as individuals that truly matters. I know that is not the case for the majority of the world, but it definitely was the point of the books, just look at Dumbledore’s quotes: “It matters not what someone is born, but what they grow to be”, “It is our choices, Harry, that show what we are, far more than our abilities”, “Differences of habit and language are noting at all if our aims are identical and our hearts are open”, and so on.

    Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences

    I definitely agree with you and appreciate that you wrote it here for others to see, and hopefully agree, too!

    Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences

    I have been remiss! Hagrid also plays a huge role in Harry’s life and was his first father figure in the magical world. He becomes like a proud uncle after Sirius fulfills the role of a father for Harry.

    Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences

    I do think the later books are intended for children, but are also more appealing to older individuals because of they have more action. There is no inappropriate language nor are there scenes I would have a problem letting a child of 7+ read.
    I would have a problem letting children watch the films because they are darker and more suited for adults, but those are rated PG-13 so kids shouldn’t be watching them anyway.

    Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences