taraeast88

taraeast88

Tara East has a Bachelor of Journalism (JCU), A Graduate Certificate in Editing and Publishing (USQ) and a Masters in Creative Writing (USC).

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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

1

Who owns creativity?

The term "creativity" or "creative" was once connected solely with art. Now, both business and science have adopted this term as a way to cast themselves as innovative, relatable, lively and fun. Some even use "creativity" as a way to insinuate that they are progressive and efficient (though there is nothing efficient about being creative!). If business and science are adopting the term "creativity," does that then encourage artists to adopt the qualities of business and science? Does art need to justify itself or can art still be produced for art’s sake? Should creative be reserved only for the arts, or is the broadening usage of the term an exciting development?

  • Should it be "Who owns creativity?" – Joseph Cernik 1 month ago
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  • I think the world of science has always relied on creativity, more so than people realize. Likewise, there are definitely approaches and techniques to art that might be associated with science, like experimentation, formula, structure, etc... But maybe a specific definition of "creativity" would help. As a whole, it's hard to say that a word can only (or should only) be used to describe one form of expression. While a word does have a certain purpose, it doesn't have to have a certain application. I guess what I'm trying to say is it sounds like a great, engaging article - but the term "creativity" and its use might need to be very clearly defined in the intro. Maybe a history of the word itself? Where does it come from and how has it been used historically up till now? Look forward to reading it! – jrdino 4 weeks ago
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  • Creativity is vital to any human activity...doctors make new innovations when they become more creative...romantic relationships grow stronger when creativity is exercised to impress and excite another person...even politicians use creativity to solve problems...or create new and exciting ones...this is a great topic to explore further... – kmaxx125 4 weeks ago
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Pending

Has the New Golden Age of television ended?

With ground breaking shows like The Sopranos, Six Feet Under, Dexter, Sons of Anarchy and Breaking Bad having ended (and the monolithic show Games of Thrones soon to follow), has the New Golden Age of television ended? Are there new shows coming to replace them? Do alternative platforms/producers like Netflix open up the opportunity to craft innovative and risky story arcs?

  • I think you have to be careful about what you call the Golden Age for another reason. Depending on the era in which they grew up and the types of shows they watched, most people will probably argue their Golden Age has already ended. But, if you define Golden Age in era- or show-specific terms, you may have an easier time making your argument. – Stephanie M. 1 year ago
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  • Netflix is the first to release episodes of a series all at once. You can kind of say that Netflix has started/fed into the Golden Age of Binge-Watching. – simplykrizia 12 months ago
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  • This is quite a valid topic as the series such as Breaking Bad, Dexter, Sons of Anarchy etc.. have left quite an impact upon their conclusion. Netflix is dominating the entertainment industry and has broadened the horizons in terms of story arcs and creative experimentation. I don't think the golden age has necessarily ended as series such as 'Fargo','Twin Peaks' and 'The Walking Dead' among others, still make for enthralling television but rather, there has been a shift from TV channels providing weekly series which one can follow, to Netflix and Stan where series' are binge-watched. – AdilYoosuf 12 months ago
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What is the appeal of time travel stories?

Time travel is a frequently revisited topic in both popular and literary fiction. What is the philosophical appeal of time travel? Does it simply speak to our personal regrets or to large global/political/social issues that we wish to undo? Is it egotistical to think that ‘hight sight is twenty-twenty’; that to know the negative outcome of one event/one decision would allow us to course correct and thereby find success? Can humanity (globally or personally) only learn or develop compassion through disaster?

  • I personally think that the appeal of time travel stories lies in our flawed nature as humans. The possibility of reversing/changing the outcome of our own mistakes and/or the wider worlds' is very appealing, as well as egotistical (we get to play the hero). However, the appeal also lies in the unknown i.e., what will the alternative outcome be if I go back in time and ensure Hitler wasn't born? Will there be a better outcome or a worse one? That's just my opinion on the topic though! – Ness 1 year ago
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  • I think it is a case of regret. Everyone has defining moments in their lives that determined the course of their life trajectory. In those vulnerable moments of self-doubt, it is only human to wonder about the road less travelled. A few suggestions for revisions: Perhaps "hightsight" could be fixed to read "hindsight." I think this is a great topic but would narrow the focus to an individual's life. Most people may not have the clout to decide world events, with all due respect to our readership. Also, examples like the Arrow and Flash and even Quantico have employed the flashback sequence. Would you want to include the examples you have in mind so the writer of this topic can understand your meaning more clearly? – Munjeera 1 year ago
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  • I've always loved time-travel stories. The appeal for me is the idea of not being tied down to any one place and not missing out. The ability to travel anywhere, during any time is the superpower that I've always wanted. There are moments in history that I would love to be apart of. And I have this unquenchable thirst to see space, and other planets and their civilisations. Not to mention, time travel means shirking responsibilities. Not being tied down to anything or anyone. For me, it's simple wanderlust to the extreme extent. – KintaW 1 year ago
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  • The underlying message within many time travel stories is to live in the moment and places extreme value in the present. I believe this is what draws us to these stories. We cannot time travel, and the spectacle that is time travel is enticing, but the resolution of the story is most commonly a reminder to cherish time that we have, not to wish back the past or anticipate the future. It is a message that is simple to grasp and easy to promise; I will enjoy every day with no regrets. – GeorgiaParry 1 year ago
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  • I think this depends largely on the story in question. There are a lot of different takes on time-travel. It would be interesting to try and find certain themes that seem to pop up within the subject most often, and analyze those, rather than the concept of time travel in general. – Ben Woollard 1 year ago
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  • I believe it is our conciseness of being stuck in a moving chronological belt of time, fixated is what makes much of the 21st century so interested in time travelling. The ability to escape this chain and break its control on us is not only embedded in the liberal thoughts of our society, but in human emotion itself. – chackz 1 year ago
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Latest Comments

taraeast88

Such a lovely routine to have established 🙂

Walking and Writing: The Effects of Exercise on Creative Thinking
taraeast88

Yup. Sometimes you can’t “figure out” a problem while sitting in front of a computer. Getting out and allowing the mind to wander doesn’t guarantee a solution will come, but so often it does.

Walking and Writing: The Effects of Exercise on Creative Thinking
taraeast88

Yes, showers, washing up dishes or other tasks where you’re mind is allowed to wander are very useful!

Walking and Writing: The Effects of Exercise on Creative Thinking
taraeast88

That’s a good idea. I enjoy hearing about other writers processes/routines. Some writers work for 45 mins and then take a 15 mins break or work for 25 mins and have a 5 mins break. Personally, I strive to work for 50 mins, but if I am really “in” the work, I tend to work through these breaks — a habit my eyes do not thank me for.

Walking and Writing: The Effects of Exercise on Creative Thinking
taraeast88

I haven’t heard of this book, thanks for the recommendation!

Walking and Writing: The Effects of Exercise on Creative Thinking
taraeast88

Don’t worry, I’ve never been on a 2-week walk either, but I have written a novel and I found that like Tegan Bennett Daylight, I was often able to resolve plot holes or brainstorm for more effectively while out walking.

Walking and Writing: The Effects of Exercise on Creative Thinking
taraeast88

I am so glad you enjoyed the article 🙂

Walking and Writing: The Effects of Exercise on Creative Thinking
taraeast88

I would say that writers are becoming increasingly aware of how important gender representations are. There is also an increasing demand for diversity amongst fiction. The only issue with diversity is the question of appropriation. If you are a white middle-class male, for example, writing about a Muslim teenage girl is like waving a red flag in front of critics. However, I believe that diversity can be incorporated into any story, it just depends on what the story is. I can write a YA novel that happens to have a queer protagonist, but I cannot write a “coming out” story because that is not a story I have access to.

YA Novels and their Modern Leading Ladies