Manga

Latest Articles

Manga
Manga
34
Manga
31
Sweet Blue Flowers
Manga
45
Manga
17
Manga
16
Manga
17
Manga
11
Manga
18
Manga
13
Manga
8

Latest Topics

5

Harem Manga: The Good or the Bad

What is the appeal of harem manga? In cases like Nisekoi, having too many female love interests hurts the story, as time is spent developing the love interests instead of moving the plot forward. As well, fan wars sprout on threads, because people argue which love interest suits the protagonist. Finally, is the ‘harem ending’ unavoidable or a cop out to make the fans happy? This article can use harem manga that do not work because of its genre, or focus on harem manga that are well-written because it utilizes the genre but stays unique in it’s own way.

  • Perhaps also mention the "gyaku-harem" (the reverse harem of one girl and too many male love interests), the contrasts, as well as the stresses and the headaches in having the relationship(s). – Quill 2 years ago
    1
  • Maybe a discussion about the character at the center of the harem would be illuminating as well. It's usually an awkward, clueless, romantically/sexually inept boy and yet he has some of the most desirable women fawning all over him. That in itself is a sin of wish-fulfillment. – bookgirl7 2 years ago
    1
  • I would say that the fan wars are part of what make manga popular. it can be incredibly fun to sit down with your friends and have a laughter filled conversation and debate over your favorite character. I think that controversy in harem animes and the lack of resolution actually makes the manga better. I do agree that too many characters detract from the plot however. – Jutor 1 year ago
    1
2

Male Protagonists in Shoujo Manga

Though most shoujo manga typically have a female protagonist, there are some that have male protagonists. With a female protagonist, shoujo manga also usually have an underlying romantic development part of the plot, which isn’t characteristic to a shoujo manga with a male protagonist. What is it about these male protagonists that classify the manga they appear in as “shoujo”? What are the similarities and/or differences of various male protagonists of shoujo manga? How do their interactions with other people, their surroundings, and the plots of the manga determine this classification? Finally, does having a male protagonist in a shoujo manga have any social implications, since the target audience is generally teenaged girls? If so, how?

A few examples include: Hakkenden, Natsume Yuujinchou, and Gakuen Babysitters. I’m sure there are others, but these are the ones I remember off the top of my head.

  • Male shoujo characters have different personalities, so it is hard to pinpoint what exactly defines them as 'shoujo'. There could be the popular one, the quiet one, the perverted brash one, the 'I-may-look-perfect-but-I-have-a-dark-secret' type... I think what makes a male protagonist belong in a shoujo manga is if the female character is able to help them in some way - whether it's improve their situation or overall attitude. Since romance plays a big part in 'shoujo', there is a sense that the male and female are perfect for one another, so they need to have some flaw that is improved once they meet the female. – YsabelGo 2 years ago
    7
5

The Appeal of Slice of Life

Slice of life is a genre that uses everyday situations as a form of entertainment. To some, slice of life can be considered boring, as the characters do mundane things such as: go to school, find part-time jobs, worry about careers, etc. However, this genre is a popular topic for mangakas to write about, so this article would discuss the appeal of slice of life, and why people watch or read it. Information can include: demographics, manga examples, and the formula for slice of life.

  • TV tropes is, as always, an excellent resource for this sort of discussion. http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/SliceOfLifeOne part of Slice of Life that TVT mentions is its escapist qualities. The essential notion here is that when building a slice of life world, it may not necessarily reflect real life.Many people seem to personally define Slice of Life as a genre of the ordinary. The environment might be mundane, but viewers are not engaged by material more boring than their own lives. The characters have to bring humor, or drama, or something to the table. The lives of the characters have to be interesting.The context of Slice of Life stories function as a restriction to writers. Therefore, writing the setting should not require much thought. The writer must focus on the characters, keeping in mind what qualities of the characters--their dynamic--makes the story interesting. – pigrocket 2 years ago
    2
4

History vs. Fiction in Rurouni Kenshin

While the Rurouni Kenshin manga was full of over-the-top action, unbelievable characters, and impossible inventions, the basis of the series was real historic figures. How does this history control and direct the Manga, and in what ways does the manga share a common linage with other works of historic fiction.

    0

    How to create a good manga

    Find out how to come up with a good manga and write some tips to help people. Also, tell them some things they SHOULD and SHOULDN’T do. Plus add some websites where they can publish their manga.

    • "come up with" is a very clunky phrase. I would just go with "write" or "create" possibly "develop." – Francesca Turauskis 2 years ago
      5
    • I would advise you to talk about comic language in general and highlight how anime differs from the western notion. Robert E. Horn has a fantastic book defining the rules of comics, and I bet there are plenty of other books and papers covering this. With "good" or "bad" as far as literature goes, there are definite ways of defining them. With a film, we have mise en scene, lighting, directing, acting, etc., and for comics, I bet there are plenty of genre-specific conventions as well. – Mitchapman14 2 years ago
      1
    • Suggestions:This is for the storytelling part:1. When creating manga, start with a general list of what you want in your manga. The list should have general themes that you want to include in the manga. Should it be a sport, slice of life, fantasy, magical girl or a mixture manga? You decide.2. Next is deciding details down. Once you have a good idea of your themes, you can start the details. This step will take a while because a strong manga is not without details. A way to narrow things down would be:-An outline of the plot (a summary of important events- you can use or create a chart of the events- it helps to clarify things in your mind)-An outline of characters (ex. a fantasy manga would usually have a being who have powers- like a wizard)Once you have a good general idea of the details, it's time to narrow things down even more!You can decide how specifically you want the plot to go- remember I said to have the important events down for the plot outline? Now it's time to decide what happens in between because important events cannot stand by itself without a good in between events. For an example, the manga "Bleach" started with a boy who can see the spirits which led to the important event of him becoming a shinigami- which shows that the little events can strengthen the bigger events. A good to see how to write little events is:-Ask yourself: how did the important events happen? - What causes the important events? -Is this little event necessary (this is SO important- don't put in a little event that leaves a plot hole or seems random fo the story!- it may either please the readers or bore them...)The characters are one of the most vital parts of a manga. We wouldn't have known the infamous trio of Naruto, Sasuke, and Sakura if they weren't strong characters and didn't pop out to the readers. How to recognize that your characters are ready for the story:-Be sure to flesh them out (it means that you know your characters so well that you can see what they will decide- which makes the story easy to write.) -Traits are important- it makes who they are and what they are. -Are they Mary Sues? (Mary Sue means basically perfect character-no flaws, no changes- it is not a bad character, but do your readers connect to them or feel isolated from them?)Don't be afraid to edit them and change them as you develop the characters- that is how you achieve a great character! "Naruto"'s creator spent a lot of time creating Naruto to finally achieve the Naruto we love today.Here's another section....I know I have rambled too long, but I will keep this short because I feel this is highly important as well.Art:Illustrating the plot and the characters are another vital part of creating a manga. Art is what appeals people to read them, and unique one can stand out among many manga titles.After having to develop the general outlines for the plot and characters, you can decide what art style you want. It depends on how well you can draw ( I do know that art is subjective, but having good illustrations and strong appearances of the characters attracts the readers). and how you unite it with the plot. How to do this is:-Environment (ex. a medieval themed manga commonly have castles and lots of lands) -Time period (ex. Futuristic time period tends to have advanced technology) -Character design (Do they fit in with the environment and time period?) -Consistency is the key (Consistent will get you recognization and a job- If "Dragonball" was not consistent in illustration, it would not have become the most famous manga it is today)-Uniqueness: This one is important. If you are aiming to create a popular manga or even a fantastic manga, uniqueness will separate you from the mass of mangakas. It will make you immediately recognizable to the readers- "One Piece" is immediately recognizable because of the art style and unique (though, neverending) plot. Avoid cliches or try to put a twist on cliches because it will tire the readers out- imagine you read a story with a great theme and plot so you read another book with that same theme and plot...and you find exactly the same ideas in that story! After some repetition, it's just an annoyance for the readers (unless you are a fan of this cliche and want to see it again and again).I could go and go on about how to create a manga, but I don't want to extend this writing too much to bore readers...so I'll stop for now. I hope this helps! – Japantakemyheart100 1 year ago
      0
    • dang that would be interesting to read. Unfortunatly, I, nor many others, are qualified to write this. I fell that this should be written by someone who has actually published a manga or similar piece of literature. They could speak from experience and probably write this better than many other people. – Jutor 1 year ago
      0
    3
    Published

    The 5 Saddest Moments in One Piece

    One Piece is a manga that started in 1997 and is still ongoing today. Despite its humour, there have been sad moments that made readers/viewers cry. For the fan that has watched all the episodes or anime, explain the 5 saddest moments in One Piece and explain how this event affected the story or character.

      1
      Published

      Dragon Ball; why is it still endearing to people everywhere?

      The original run of the manga and anime, Dragon Ball, the most popular work by mangaka Akira Toriyama, has long since finished (although a new series of films and episodes is just being released in Japan). And yet, it is arguably the most popular Shonen series even to this day. What is it about the series that is so compelling? Are the characters and their arcs sympathetic, or is it the simplicity of the story-telling and morals?

      • As a life long fan of Dragon Ball myself, I'd say its a combination of both. Dragon Ball started out about the adventure and growth of Goku's character as he trains to be the strongest fighter along with his childlike innocence and kindness that makes him compelling to follow on his adventures. Where as Dragon Ball Z stepped up the game with bigger threats that pushed Goku's limits even further with life threatening villains and introduced plot concepts that could have been never conceived in the original story. But aside that, it was also the shonen series that introduced character and manga/anime tropes that would later be used in other manga and anime, such as iconic special attacks that is recognizable with a specific character. And was also the major inspiration for other manga series, mostly known with Naruto and One Piece. – Ryan Walsh 2 years ago
        1
      5

      Death Note and Nihilism

      The successful manga Death Note by Tsugumi Ohba is about what if one person (the main character Light Yagami) could kill anyone they wish by simply writing down a name.

      Since that’s how the Death Note works, *spoilers* it isn’t surprising that Light loses not only his life but also any compassion he had towards the people he personally knew, including his own family.

      As a result, the story of Death Note shares possible connections to the philosophy of nihilism by Friedrich Nietzsche.

      Analyze those connections in the Death Note manga to nihilism’s definition and practice. Include also how Death Note has been mistaken like nihilism (link) as something to literally follow in real life (link)

      Please note that this topic doesn’t focus on the Death Note anime/show but the original Death Note manga only (i.e. where Light was told early on that there is nothing after death by his Death Note’s shinigami owner.) Therefore, that aspect of the Death Note manga connects back to nihilism as an example since nihilistic belief is also about there being no afterlife.

      • I would point out that the show does point out that Light does end up changing things because the crime rate went down tremendously. SO, I wouldn't say 'attempt to change life never works.' To relate an Anime to a Philosopher, we need actual evidence of the philosopher. – SpectreWriter 2 years ago
        4
      • In regards to your first link, I would be wary of it. He makes mention of Nietzsche's famous quote, "God is dead!" but he does not give context to it, or even make mention-- for those who have not read, The Gay Science-- where the quote comes from. The quote comes from section 125 in The Gay Science and the section is italicized, The Madman. For your sake I'll quote it,The Madman.-- Have you ever heard of the madman who on a bright morning lighted a lantern and ran to the market-place calling out unceasingly: "I seek God! I seek God!"-- As there were many people standing about who did not believe in God, he caused a great deal of amusement. Why! is he lost? said one. Has he strayed away like a child? said another. Or does he keep himself hidden? Is he afraid of us? Has he taken a sea-voyage? Has he emigrated?--the people cried out laughingly, all in a hubbub. The insane man jumped into their midst and transfixed them with his glances. "Where is God gone?" he called out. "I mean to tell you! We have killed him,--you and I! We are all his murderers! but how have we done it? How were we able to drink up the sea? Who gave earth from its sun? Whither does it now move? Whither do we move? Away from all suns? Do we not dash on unceasingly? Backwards, sideways, forwards, in all directions? Is there still an above and below? Do we not stray, as through infinite nothingness? Does not empty space breath upon us? Has it not become colder? Does not night come on continually, darker and darker? Shall we not have to light lanterns in the morning? Dow we not hear the noise of the grave-diggers who are burying God? Do we not smell the divine putrefaction?--for even God putrefy! God is dead! God remains dead! And we have killed him! How shall we console our selves, the most murderous of all murderers? The holiest and the mightiest that the world has hitherto possessed, has bled to death under our knife,--who will wipe the blood from us?....That is most of the section. For a better knowledge of Nihilism and Nietzsche in general, I refer to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Not only is it free, but every article provides citations to tell you where this idea came from and why they are citing it.It might even be interesting, in staying with the Nietzsche vein, to think about the possibility that either Light or L are the Übermensch (Overman or superman in German). – garland41 2 years ago
        4