VelvetRose

VelvetRose

Aspiring author and journalist-in-training, I am studying journalism, film, and the English language and will write for every reason, every chance that I get.

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    Latest Articles

    Latest Topics

    2

    Disney's Live-Action Remakes: A Good Choice for the Studio?

    Discuss Disney’s decision to remake several of their classic films into live-action such as Beauty and the Beast, Mulan, Dumbo, Alice Through the Looking Glass, an Aladdin prelude, The Jungle Book, Pinocchio, and Tinker Bell. Why do audiences find live-action version of stories they’ve already been told so appealing? Will the live-action prequels or sequels be considered canon with the animated films? Is this a good strategy to make a lot of money? Maybe touch on the previous live-action retellings such as Maleficent, Cinderella, and Alice in Wonderland and how they led Disney to making so many more.

    • The only problem with Disney constantly remaking there animated films into live action is that some other films seem a tad unnecessary. On one hand, The Idea of a live action Mulan is very interesting because of how diverse the cast would be with it taking place in China. On the other hand, do we really need a Night on Bald Mountain movie, Because the original version from Fantasia is fine the way it is. Disney should feel obligated to remake there older films only if they feel it needs improvement. – Aaron Hatch 2 years ago
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    • Another unfortunate trend with Disney's live-action remakes is how they too often tend to change the story or characters from their animated films. Particularly in the case of Maleficent, the title character was rewritten to be a positive force in Princess Aurora's life even though Aurora was supposed to have been cursed by Maleficent in Sleeping Beauty. As a result, many of Sleeping Beauty's other characters no longer resembled themselves as they once were; King Stefan got made the villain to replace Maleficent, Prince Philip was relegated to a bit part, the three good fairies became incompetent twits, etc.So logically, such changes could lessen the live-action films' claim of being connected to Disney's animated films and cause fans to lose support since fans of the originals would be the most expected draw for an audience to watch any live-action remake. The fans would mistakenly be expecting a straightforward transition from animation to live-action of their favorite Disney film and end up feeling disinclined to see another which might hurt Disney's live-action films' financial success in the long run. – dsoumilas 2 years ago
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    • Also discussing the limits live-action would place on a story originally told through the more liberating medium of animation would enrich your analysis. – Luthien 2 years ago
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    • On a more positive note these live action remakes are introducing these stories to a newer generation. Younger folks might prefer to watch a newer films rather than the older 2D animated film. – Cagney 2 years ago
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    • It would be interesting to review some of these films whteher they are a Disney film or not. Take Beauty and the Beast for example, there was a live action French film La Belle et la Bete made in 1946 with some homosexual themes running through it (the director and actor who played the beast were having an affair at the time); then there was the television series which I believe George R.R. Martin worked on in the 80s before the animated version in 91 and now we have another live action film. This would suggest that these sorts of stories are popular no matter what the time period is and Disney obviously see this and use it to their advantage. – Jamie White 2 years ago
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    • Remaking 2D animations into live-action films can be positive for a couple of reasons. One reason could be, the person loves the Disney animation so much that seeing it come to life just makes the story even better. For example, the live-action film "Cinderella." I always imagined how a pumpkin carriage would look like in real life, so watching the movie and seeing the carriage in all its glory was pretty spectacular. Another reason would be feeling like a kid again when you are an adult. For example, if you have children and they want to go see the live-action Disney film; it is great for the parent because they get to re-live their childhood and can see their favourite story again in a new way. Therefore, live-action remakes can be a good idea. – alyssa717 2 years ago
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    • The problem with this idea is the answer is clearly yes. If you are asking about the studio, they only care about the money. New ideas, art, creativity, originality are not their concern. It is all about money and these films are making that money feeding on a generation's nostalgia and still being accessible to a younger audience. Then if we broaden the article on whether it is a good idea or not in general, both sides have been exhausted and I feel wouldn't be saying anything necessarily new. – Erin Derwin 2 years ago
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    Trailers and Teasers: Movies That Have Been Over-Hyped

    Discuss the use of teaser trailers leading up to first trailers which make way for the REAL trailers which give way to smaller, lighter trailers, all of which lead up to a movie. Are the ten extra seconds of footage really necessary? Is a countdown really necessary? Is it genius marketing to make people watch the same footage over and over again in the hopes of catching two seconds of newer footage?

    Possible points to cover: The hype leading up to Age of Ultron, the teeny tiny teaser released for Ant-Man, leaked Comic-con clips, the trailers for Mockingjay Part 2, etc.

    • I think teasers as made by the film company should include external footage from the actual film, because yes, some movies get over-hyped. Nobody likes when all the good parts in the movie are the entirety of the trailer and then they get to the movie and realize they did that because there is nothing left that's good to show. For example: this teaser trailer for the coming Deadpool movie https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yaQjTcRkCNk was it necessary to release it the day before the actual trailer? Probably not but heck if it wasn't hype! – Slaidey 2 years ago
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    • Another point that could be addressed with this topic is how sometimes a teaser or trailer for a film may contain material that had been deleted from the actual film in question (as was the case in The Amazing Spider-Man 2 and the latest version of Godzilla which were both released last year). Therefore, these teasers/trailers have the potential to outright deceive their audience through emphasizing hype. – dsoumilas 2 years ago
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    • I do believe that 10 second teasers give the audience a better glimpse of different aspects of the upcoming movie or tv show. As a viewer, it is exciting to see a very SLIGHT glimpse of a creepy clown that might be in American Horror Story. However, I do agree that the teasers have gone too far in other respect. For instance, look at the Suicide Squad movie that is currently in production. They have on-set pictures being released almost on the daily so much as to now there are very few surprises left for the audience when it comes to the actual movie. No, I did not want to see what the Ben Affleck 's Batman costume is going to look like. That's why I'm paying $10+ dollars when it comes to the movie. No, I don't want to see pictures of Batman atop of the Joker's car. Christmas is more exciting when there are presents to open and you will be thanking yourself that you didn't open them early. – abaney 2 years ago
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    • It feels like sequels and reboots in particular get sooooo many teasers and trailers compared to non franchise films. That might be an interesting point to discuss. – Cagney 2 years ago
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    Diversity in Superhero Films and Media

    Is there enough diversity in superhero culture, particularly in movies and TV shows? Marvel’s Agent Carter, for example, contians an all-white cast. Marvel’s The Avengers displays a roster of white Avengers. While it’s true that Age of Ultron displays War Machine (Don Cheadle) and Falcon (Anthony Mackie), both actors of colour, they did not play significant roles. BUT are they a sign that there is more diversity to come? There is even talk of "white-washing" the role of The Ancient One in Marvel’s future Doctor Strange by having Tilda Swinton play an Asian character (possibly). Is it just Marvel? DC’s Arrow demonstrates diversity with one of their main characters: John Diggle (David Ramsey) and a recurring character: Amanda Waller (Cynthia Addai-Robinson). DC’s The Flash stars Jesse L. Martin and Candice Patton as Joe and Iris West respectively, both actors of colour. Is superhero pop culture in need of more diversity? Thoughts?

    • Something to possibly touch on: the reaction of the general public when Don Glover expressed interest in playing Spiderman in the reboot (where the role went to Andrew Garfield). – Andie 2 years ago
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    • I'm not overly familiar with DC adaptations but I think it's fair to say most superhero franchises could do a better job of diversifying. This goes for race, gender, and sexuality. Progress is certainly being made - with Black Panther and Captain Marvel movies, but more could be done. To add on to the topic of Spider-man a statement had been made that casting was leaning heavily towards a POC to play Peter Parker in the second reboot but when the short list came out, all the actors were white with Asa Butterfield as the lead contender. – Amelia Fairweather 2 years ago
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    Latest Comments

    VelvetRose

    Really amazing article. I feel more educated about the holocaust and this was a good read.

    Using X-Men: Magneto Testament to Teach the Holocaust
    VelvetRose

    This was a good read. I liked your analysis of the Disney princesses and the gender roles of their time period as well as the other arguments you make.

    Masculinity and the Disney Princess
    VelvetRose

    Pretty good article. You could have also mentioned the planned Defenders series and if audiences need to watch all of the Netflix individual shows to watch that. You could also have touched upon watching the individual films in order to understand the Avengers team-up films. A cool thing to mention might also have been the tie-in comics/”preludes” and what they add to the story. But what you did touch upon was great. Good job.

    Is Watching the Entire Marvel Cinematic Universe Necessary?
    VelvetRose

    Really well-written article that does a good job of explaining why we all love Harry Potter.

    Why Harry Potter Appeals to Adults as Well as Younger Audiences
    VelvetRose

    Wonderful article. Very interesting and very true. Other things you could have mentioned are the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle remakes, the previous Fantastic Four, the Spider-man remakes, etc. But otherwise, really good job!

    The Three Eras of The Modern Comic Book Movie
    VelvetRose

    Interesting read. I would like to point out that you list Nebula as a Guardian of the Galaxy, but it’s actually Gamora. Nebula is Gamora’s adopted sister and secondary antagonist. Regardless, I agree with the majority of what you’ve written and I enjoyed reading.

    The Superhero Film in The Modern Era
    VelvetRose

    Wonderful article. I know so many people who’ve seen the movies who just brush Steve Rogers aside as a bland and uninteresting character and don’t feel bad for him at all. The fact that he might be suffering from depression is something a lot of people overlook. I’m glad you wrote this.

    Captain America: A Case Study in Depression
    VelvetRose

    I really appreciate that you took the time to correct me on all of that. It’s true that I am more familiar with Marvel and I completely understand all of the points you made. I see that I have made many mistakes in my lack of research and on the points that I chose to focus on. I can’t believe that I didn’t focus on actual treatment of the character more than just how she looks. Your comment is probably more informative than the actual article! Thank you for bringing this to my attention.

    Female Superhero Representation in Comics