Morgan R. Muller

Morgan R. Muller

Hobbies: graphic design, reading, writing, & photography • Favorites: dogs, chicken fingers, & books

Contributor I

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  • Articles
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    1
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  • Ext. Comments
    42
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    7
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  • Topics
    7
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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

1

Fashioning Female Identity

The emphasis of a woman’s appearance as a means of fashioning an identity in literature, art, film, or TV. Discuss and explore the ways in which fashion and consumer culture influence individual self-creation (whether it be in literature, film, etc.). Female beauty and self-confidence are consistently linked to male attention in literature, and this “beauty” that attracts the men is, most of the time, some kind of physical beauty. This topic would analyze how beauty is equated with physical appearance (meaning possession of expensive commodities and attractive body shape) and how a woman’s level of attractiveness is often linked to the status, price and brand, of her clothing and commodities in literature, film, or TV. Furthermore, discuss the idea that women’s appearances are emphasized and linked to consumer culture and often times used as a means of connection to wealth and status in literature, TV, film, or any other form of art/ popular culture.

  • This could be particularly interesting to talk about this in regards to literature, as a woman's appearance isn't seen but described. – Marcie Waters 1 year ago
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  • This sounds like a good topic. Some examples of female fashion could be Wonder Woman, Supergirl, and Agent Carter. Or the writer could look at how the three women in Big Bang Theory all look very different and how their outfits express their character for TV and how their outfits have evolved over time and the impact of their attractiveness on relationships. One interesting aspect is the recurring theme of attractive women. Munjeera – Munjeera 1 year ago
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  • Nice topic. When reading it though, I thought about female characters who the author describes as plain (i.e., Jane Eyre) or who say themselves they aren't pretty (i.e., Sara Crewe). Are such heroines really unattractive, or are we meant to pooh-pooh such statements and say they're pretty anyway? In describing such characters as plain or ugly, do the authors privilege inner beauty, or are they just feeding appearance obsession more? – Stephanie M. 2 months ago
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Hollywood's Representation of African History

There has been much debate about the representation of Africa (past and present) in popular culture; specifically, in the music and film industries. For example, in Taylor Swift’s music video for her song "Wildest Dreams," set in colonial Africa, the representation of Africa is directly through the lens of white Western lives. The trope of white colonial romance in Africa is a main element of the music video.

Why is popular culture so invested in this theme of white colonial romance in Africa and how does this perpetuate racist stereotypes in the media today? How does hollywood and popular culture’s celebration of white colonial privilege promote racist stereotypes and silence African agency and voice?

  • I think you have already hit a key element in this topic when it comes to promoting racist stereotypes and silencing the African voice - representing Africa through the lens of white Western lives. So long as Africa and Africans continue to be represented through a white lens, stereotypes will continue to perpetuate and African voices will only be overshadowed by the white ones. This goes all the way back to Joseph Conrad's "The Heart of Darkness," if not further, to today's "The Help" by Kathryn Stockett. Only when the African voice can represent itself, like amazing Harlem writers like Zora Neale Hurston try, will it resonate over white privilege. This is a fascinating subject. Good luck! – selysrivera 1 year ago
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Gendered Humor

Analyze the theory or cultural understanding and/or gender ideology that women aren’t funny and the idea that when women use "men’s humor" they are judged as being profane. Also, explore who men and women have used humor to degrading women and desensitize audiences to serious topics such as rape, sexual assault, etc. Why are categories of humor based on gender? What about just calling it human humor?

  • Make sure to edit this and take out "thing" after "funny." It is not needed. Great topic. – Diego Santoyo 1 year ago
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  • Personally unaffected by the ideas first expressed in this topic, it will never be quite possible to have "human humor" because we have a society which doesn't differentiate gender and sex. There will never not be gender based humor because men will never understand menstruating and women will never achieve the slap-stick of getting kicked in the balls. – Slaidey 1 year ago
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  • Great topic! I'd love to see, if you can, explore how genderless comedy can become prevalent. There are many comedians who use gender to propel themselves and it just does not work. However, gender can play a huge role in informing on gender inequality. The Colbert Report and The Daily Show actually did a decent job with this without being derogatory or perpetuating harmful ideologies (like Tosh.0...) – AriadneDeLaMans 1 year ago
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Popular Culture Depiction of Women in Prison

Analyze representations of female prisoners in the media (TV, movies, etc.) and explore the question of whether or not these depictions are accurate and/or realistic portrayals of women in prison and/or women’s correctional facilities. This topic can also be broadened to include all people (male, female, etc.). Some examples of content that can be analyzed would be representations of female prisoners in the television series Orange Is The New Black and/or the television series Prison Break, etc.

  • I haven't watched it but I heard Wentworth was an all female prison show on Netflix gaining in popularity. Perhaps it could also contribute to the article's analysis. – Slaidey 1 year ago
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Published

Gender Ideology in Disney Princess Films

The representations of gender in the Disney princess films is an important topic for discussion in terms of the lasting gender images of femininity and masculinity such movies have on younger generations, especially younger females. The earlier films, such as Sleeping Beauty, demonstrate how culture constructs femininity and masculinity in terms of the beauty ideals. Later films, such as Brave, portray femininity with a more masculine touch by adding male characteristics, such as independence, athleticism, and courage, to the female protagonists. Overtime, have the representations of femininity and the roles and expectations of Disney princesses changed for the better? How do these new representations of gender ideology positively or negatively influence young viewers?

  • This is definitely an interesting topic! I think the representations of femininity in Disney films have, in fact, changed for the better. Without knocking too much on the classic princesses, what do they have to offer besides beauty and being a plot device? Of course, not all classic Disney princesses are just objects of beauty. Belle, for example, is my favorite princess because she's so intelligent, and that's what sets her apart. But nowadays you see a lot more of characters like Elsa, Mulan, and Merida, who take on specifically masculine traits in their actions, behavior, quests, etc.. Even in shows like Once Upon a Time, Snow White has become this brave, fierce warrior. She is no longer just a pretty face. – Christina Legler 1 year ago
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Gender Identity in Shakespeare's Works

Analyze William Shakespeare’s various constructions of gender through his plays and/or sonnets and explore the significance of gender identity in his works. For example, in King Lear Shakespeare’s construction of gender emphasizes the multiple family betrayals and the humankind’s constant committal of sin. In many of his plays, Shakespeare plays around with gender identity and sexuality…why does he do this and what are the underlying themes/ points he makes through his constructions of gender?

  • This is an excellent choice. I think that whoever picks this up should definitely write on "As You Like It" which is ALL about gender dynamics, and "Taming of the Shrew" which is about dominating women. – Jemarc Axinto 1 year ago
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  • From a literary perspective, this is quite a large topic, to the extent where you could write on this topic, whilst discussing only one of his plays. Macbeth would be the best play for discussion, in that there is plenty of obvious material. Twelfth Night would also be a good choice of a play to discuss, on this particular topic. – JDJankowski 1 year ago
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  • I agree that it's probably a good idea to narrow the focus here. Maybe look at gender in just the tragedies or just the comedies. Or focus on a particular issue, such as women disguising themselves as men (Portia in Merchant of Venice; Rosalind in As You Like It; Viola in Twelfth Night) or the mysterious absence of King Lear's wife. – JLaurenceCohen 1 year ago
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  • I would definitely be interested in a topic that dissects the genderfluidity in plays like Merchant of Venice and Twelfth Night and how that relates to sexuality. Also, there's the absence of mothers, such as in Titus Andronicus, Taming of the Shrew, and King Lear. It would be intriguing, especially because of ideas in Elizabethean times, such as the belief that the uterus is essentially a lesser penis, and how those assumptions led to stereotypes about the sexes. Shakespeare is great at acknowledging and subverting then-modern thoughts, and his plays were rife with double entendres. – emilydeibler 1 year ago
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Shakespeare's Famous Founding Fools

Shakespeare’s stage clowns stand apart from his other characters by the way they break down barriers, provide comic relief, and guide the audience through the many layers of complexity that are characteristic of all of his plays. Shakespeare’s progress towards self-discovery by way of disguise and foolery is achieved through the invention of these comic characters. The creation of these fools symbolizes one of Shakespeare’s many contributions to literary tradition. More importantly, these Fools are the critics inside his plays and without their truthful presence Shakespeare’s works would be transformed for the worse. With his famous founding fools, Shakespeare reveals faults in judgment and values and never fails to shed light on the socio-cultural Renaissance atmosphere. So, the question up for discussion is what would Shakespeare’s works be without his famous founding fools?

  • Without Feste in 12th night, who would match Olivia's wit? I love Feste as amiable challenger-- his jokes aren't crude and sharp like Lear's Fool-- but instead push the word-play and language further. – haleesue 1 year ago
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Latest Comments

Morgan R. Muller

I completely agree. He tends to introduce extremely intriguing female characters and then have them fade away from the text–they come and go rather quickly.

Gender Myths in Neil Gaiman's American Gods
Morgan R. Muller

Very interesting topic and well written article, great job!

How 'By the Book' Should Literary Adaptations Be?
Morgan R. Muller

Very interesting article and intriguing topic for discussion!

Unbear(d)able: The Rise of Secondary Sexual Characteristics in Television
Morgan R. Muller

Yes, yes she is; but, that is the beauty of her writing :).

Virginia Woolf: A Palpable Parody of Patriarchal Power
Morgan R. Muller

I completely agree, for that sentence was not phrased well and my intention was to draw conclusions about Woolf’s characters existing in the early 1900s. Thank you for the comment!

Virginia Woolf: A Palpable Parody of Patriarchal Power
Morgan R. Muller

Thank you very much for writing this piece and bring this crucial issue into discussion. I watched the first two seasons of Game of Thrones and had to stop because I was disgusted by endless scenes featuring rape, assault, and violence against women. “The more we see rape on television, the more it becomes expected and normalized. Instead we should ask ourselves, “do these scenes perpetuate a culture that encourages violence against women?” The latter point that you made is extremely important. Thank you for posing this question and shedding light on a subject that is excused and ignored.

Also, to the point you made about fans of the show excusing these horrific scenes of rape and sexual assault by saying it is a part of the culture/ society that the show is portraying and the idea that (as you said) “There is sexual violence in the world and many insist that this is a good enough reason for it to appear on film. This would imply that TV shows always relay to us what is really going on outside of our living room. Television is not about reality, it is about perception.” I completely agree–if TV shows relayed reality then why is it that there are so few male rape scenes shown on television? Male rape is a reality, but you rarely see it portrayed on TV shows…so why is it okay to watch countless scenes of female rape, sexual abuse, and violence?

Great article and analysis. Thank you for writing this.

Sexual Assault in HBO's Game of Thrones
Morgan R. Muller

Interesting defense to the pointless nudity on Game Of Thrones and a compelling topic to explore and analyze. Love the witty title and voice of the article, great job!

Game of Thrones: Don't Judge a Boob by its Cover
Morgan R. Muller

Interesting take on an intriguing subject for discussion and awesome observations. Great job!

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