Batman V Superman

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Batman v Superman Throws Away Its Main Point

With the new Batman v Superman film audiences were ready for an amazing showdown between two of DC’s greatest characters, to see both there ideologies crash together. But did this film deliver on this? Or was the easy and quick plot mover of kidnapping Superman’s mother the only real tangible character motivation for their final fight. Did the film simply gloss over and not explore their personal philosophical differences enough?

  • I would try and be more specific with what you're asking here. For instance, many may be unfamiliar with Batman and Superman's conflicting ideologies, so go ahead and explain what they are. Is the movie also making a statement about not only the heroes ideologies, but base human ideologies as well? An example could be that Superman could represent a God-figure for those who are heavily theological and driven by faith, whereas Batman could be a God-figure for those who are more secular and less persuaded by the idea of a divine entity. Other than that, this could definitely be an interesting read. – JKKN 4 years ago
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  • I myself find it hard to get over the one specific scene in the film. "I have to lead him back through the city." 1. 5 minutes ago it was proven the plane could be remotely controlled, so Batman could just have Alfred distract Doomsday so he can secure the weapon. 2. Unnecessary collateral damage was the whole reason Batman hated Superman to begin with.Also, the whole problem with the film entirely is trying to combine two different story lines (Death of Superman and The Dark Knight) without realizing the way Superman acts in both books is totally different from one another. – ajester 4 years ago
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  • Great topic. I would add that it might be helpful to examine these characters in the context of modern-day conversations of war and destruction -- a "do-the-ends-justify-the-means" conundrum that is faced by many countries today. The film could have made some powerful statements about modern warfare, and totally failed by subverting its gaze toward multiple plotlines with no resolution, and character development that hit a brick wall. – Kathleen Lassiter 4 years ago
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  • Honestly, I think one could discuss how the film undermines ANY point it tries to make morally or politically. In my mind it is the very definition of sound and fury signifying nothing; truly a tale told by an idiot. – KALOPSIA118 4 years ago
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Is Batman v Superman necessary?

It seems that DC is trying so hard to force a DC cinematic universe that they are forgetting that good individual movies come before the spectacle of watching multiple superheroes clash with each other.

  • Agreed. It seems as if it is all just a precursor to the League of Justice. I think Avengers worked well because individual story lines were developed so when there was an ensemble superhero cast we could all watch our favorite. But I am more of a Marvel girl. – Munjeera 4 years ago
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  • Exactly. With DC's poor rushed attempt to form their Justice League, we have to acknowledge that they're in an industry rivalling against Marvel. This competition and craze to cash in on the superhero movie buzz is causing some very bad films right now. – KellyKova 4 years ago
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  • I so agree with this. The fact that the audience was introduced to a new Batman really hurt the film; Affleck did a decent job, but since this particular DC universe hadn't established his character, Goyer made us watch his parents die again, not once, but TWICE in the film -- utterly ridiculous! – Kathleen Lassiter 4 years ago
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  • > I think Avengers worked well because individual story lines were developed so when there was an ensemble superhero cast we could all watch our favorite. ===== I think a major difference between DC and Marvel though is that the DC heroes are (not to be combative) more well known. Superman, Wonder Woman, Batman these are iconoclasts. Compared to C-listers like Iron Man and Thor (whose relatively well known as a Norse Diety but much less known in his Marvel Incarnation). The Marvel characters NEED introduction and Marvel did that brilliantly. They made Iron Man a rock star and I know comic nerds who still couldn't name 3 Iron Man villains. There may be problems with Superman v Batman but I definitely can't fault the idea of skipping all the introductions to characters that have been in the front of pop culture since the 70s. – wolfkin 4 years ago
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Why do Superheros struggle with morality and villans do not?

The majority of Batman vs. Superman was their inner struggle of "am I doing the right thing?" whereas the villain was highly motivated and did not need validation. Even when the villains efforts are thwarted, he still tends to hold strong to what he is set out to do, whereas setback with Superhero’s cause them to waiver. Why is this? Discuss

  • Perhaps the writer can delve into some simple psychology for the comparisons. For example, sociopathic and psychopathic tendencies. – Venus Echos 4 years ago
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  • I think it just depends. At the same time the hero is meant to stand for something. They are to be seen as a way that they are still human and have struggles. They know that what they are doing may seem right, protecting people, but is it really the right thing. It is that idea of knowing what is really right and what is really wrong that defines heroes. The villains however look for self interest, so they naturally do not get set back by their disbelief. – josefcdavis 4 years ago
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  • I think many villains struggle with their inner conflict that is self-centered--what makes them so evil is their absolute inability to have empathy for others. – Jason052714 4 years ago
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  • A fully developed villain should have some sort of inner struggle. The struggle should also create pathos for the villain on the part of the audience. Another type of villain is one who is ensnared by one of the seven deadly sins: greed, lying etc. Villains also serve as a foil for the superhero. Some great villains are humans who show how inhuman they are towards people. Some villains do struggle with morality do they not? – Munjeera 4 years ago
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  • I think both superheroes and villains have had struggles with morality, and took different paths with regard to it. They have questioned it, and as a result of this questioning, they have made their choice of becoming who they were meant to be - either villains or superheroes: the former having abandoned the idea of morality, the latter always employing it as one of their values, and becoming their emblem. – Susanna Princivalle 4 years ago
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