Journalism

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5

Is Print Media Beyond Saving?

As the number of digital news sources rise, the number of print media consumers falls. Many believe that the death of print is inevitable since the generations that are accustom to print will eventually die out. Do you think younger generations will keep print alive? Is it really worth saving?

  • I think it will stay around as a novelty, especially since we can't keep the aesthetic of a bookshelf to display all our favorite works with an e-book for each lol I hope it stays around in some form but it's hard to say. – Slaidey 1 year ago
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  • That's a tough question to answer. I do think there is something irreplaceable about being able to physically hold something (such as a print book) that online sources just can't give you. At the same time, online sources are more accessible, reach a larger audience, are cheaper than print, and can be taken anywhere as long as you have digital access. I don't think print media will go away completely, but as it becomes more "outdated" I think it will become more of a collector's item like vinyl records - not used as often, but something people like to hold on to as a work of art. – fhlloyd 1 year ago
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  • A printer technician is working for his or her expertise in maintaining the proper operation of pressure equipment in a commercial facility. These people are part of a company's maintenance department and usually report all manager's instructions and follow them. These printer technicians often have to undergo professional training to familiarize themselves with the company's operations. – chrissamson 12 months ago
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  • The term or expression "print media" seems quite broad addressing daily newspapers as well as books and therefore book stores. Too broad a term makes it difficult to focus on specifics, which I think is needed to address this issue in a thoughtful way. – Joseph Cernik 12 months ago
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  • Terrifying question to anyone who loves literature/reading, but a good one. I think it'll stay around yes, but with time it'll most likely make a shift to a "vintage" sort of aesthetic rather than what it is today. I think it'll be a large aspect of any reader's life regardless because well having the physical book is different than an e-book, but when it comes to industry, it'll definitely change. There is a Forbes article titled "The Barnes and Nobles Buyout: A Godsend For Book Readers And Investors" where it talks about B&N barely being saved from bankruptcy. It's definitely a frightening time for the publishing industry indeed. – Scharina 11 months ago
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  • Publishers Weekly records that print sales remain strong. Have you watched CNN recently? Do those commentators and interviewees sitting in front of their bookshelves at home really read those books, or are they a stage set like the one "Owl Eyes" discovers in Jay Gatsby's "library" in The Great Gatsby? As Mr. Cernik points out here, "print media" is a large category that takes in many forms. The history of the book suggests that the book will remain around for quite some time. – rockandrollbob 6 months ago
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12

Is Objective Journalism Dead?

Discuss modern journalism and answer the question of whether objectivity in journalism has been forsaken. On the left we have Huffington Post, and on the right we have Breitbart (of course there are other examples to use on both ends of the spectrum); question and answer why there has been an uprising in biased reporting in the Western world. Explore the causes of this and compare modern journalism to past journalism such as the 1920’s (or any time period the author chooses).

  • This is a great topic...Something you can add may be the role television, the internet and other mass media portals played in this. – MikeySheff 4 years ago
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  • Interesting topic, though I'm not convinced that journalism has ever been truly objective. While objectivity sounds like a lovely ideal, it's worth questioning how possible (or even useful) it actually is. Some of the most iconic journalists from history (Murrow comes to mind) achieved that status by being opinionated, and bringing about real-world change with their opinions. Perhaps the onus need not be on the journalists to not take a stand on divisive issues, but rather on media consumers to read what's been written by both Left and Right-wing journalists to form their own opinions. – ProtoCanon 4 years ago
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  • It's also helpful to think about why news organizations have changed over time due to corporate control.Many owners now emphasize profit margins over quality news. – seouljustice 4 years ago
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  • Objective journalism never existed. The first papers in America were colonial papers which were not allowed to publish anything bad about the government without facing jail-time. Post colonial papers were entirely sponsored by political parties who used newspapers to attack opposing candidates from different parties. Then came the penny press which sensationalized stories, focused on celebrity news, and sometimes fabricated entire stories. It wasn't until the 1800's the a facts-driven model was introduced and there was more of an emphasis on being objective, though even then they never entirely were. Now a day, Opinion Journalism plays a huge part in media as a whole. Opinion Journalism should not be confused with Counterfeit Opinion Journalism, which consists of those crazy, outlandish claims and accusations based on personal belief and emotions. In contrast, real Opinion pieces consist of facts, actual news, in which the writer takes into account and then draws and educated conclusion. Whether the reader agrees with the writer or not is irrelevant, if the facts are correct and provided in context, its still valuable news. A lot of the Counterfeit you see is spread because we no longer have men sitting in chairs deciding what we hear and see. Now, we are the gatekeepers of media, and if we continue to spread false news, it will continue to be printed. – HDumars 4 years ago
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  • Protocannon's correct: all journalism is "yellow" (see William Randolph Hearst). A positive about ubiquitous Internet news sources is that silencing them would be like playing Whack-a-Mole for our central scrutinizers; one bad part is that many internet news sources, too, play Whack-a-Mole with the truth. – Tigey 4 years ago
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  • While I agree that all journalistic outlets have varying degrees of bias, try looking for publications that make real efforts to be as objective as possible. Most modern local newspapers and broadcast stations tend to be as close to neutral as they can without sensationalizing their stories. I hope this helps. – Tanner Ollo 3 years ago
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  • You should also look into the worrying trend of news outlets quoting no other sources than Twitter. Credible sources seem to be a thing of the past in the mainstream media. – AGMacdonald 3 years ago
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  • After spending the lead up to the US election on the campaign trail, Australian editor and journalist Aleks Vickovich argues there is now no question: objective journalism as we knew it, is dead. In your post, you can explain why the role of media as an impartial observer is redundant and the significant implications this has for media businesses. – ChristinaBattons 3 years ago
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  • Oh it is absolutely dead. Now a days, reporters and journalist to focus on objective news reporting. They are focused on what appeases the audience, so they can get more viewership. Facts don't matter anymore. It's all about money and ratings. – justjohn3365 11 months ago
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Journalism's "Conflict of Interest"

For the FT journalists and freelancers out there, what actually IS a conflict of interest and why are reporters and professors of journalists so opposed to it? If you’re passionate about anime clubs in schools or city-wide clean-up days, for example, and no one else in the newsroom is, should you write about one of those passions, or pass it off to someone else because of a so-called "bias"? What’s a journalist to do?

  • Investigative journalism does appear to becoming a lost art. The good news is since we have YouTube anyone can make the news or become the news. Case in point was the Principal's wife who returned a call to a high school students who complained when the school was closed down for a day. The students posted her tirade on YouTube and in this way created his own news, much to the chagrin of the Principal's wife who was quite insulting in her venting. – Munjeera 4 years ago
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  • Journalism has always fascinated me, however there are some topics revolving around it that I haven't seen disected and discussed like "has journalism passed its peak?", "why is it becoming harder and harder to put your foot in the door be successful and be able to make a living at it?" And "why are prospective students being discouraged from following their passion for journalism?" – nnader 4 years ago
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The demise of Hard News and the need for a revival of good old storytelling

As a staff member of my University’s Newspaper, I have come to the conclusion that typical, straight news articles should no longer exist. Especially in a young adult environment, straight forward articles with no personality or something to grab you, are not something people reach for and that is heavily affecting people’s knowledge about the world around them. Basically what I’m saying is that so many more students COULD be reading our publication but we don’t give them a reason to. I love print journalism and I think more people should too.

This article could almost be a letter to newspapers, and remind journalists that they are telling a story, and not listing off facts. All of the most popular publications, such as Vice, talk about hard hitting news but through a fascinating and unique perspective. I think this also affects the quality of journalists we have as a society– as time progresses, journalists are taught simply to meet deadlines and get the news out there; which is important for television news because of it’s immediacy. That extra night or so should be taken to their advantage– make print journalism popular again and give people a reason to read.

  • I like this topic a lot but be careful with the 'letter' format. You can be personal but in still objective and formal, in a 'journalisitic' way if you know what I mean. No first person narrative and blogging style so it can fit with the rest of the articles on the platform :) – Rachel Elfassy Bitoun 5 years ago
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  • I'm interested in seeing something like this, but I have two concerns. The first is that this doesn't seem like the sort of article normally published on The Artifice, considering it is more like an op-ed or manifesto than an info-popular article, and neither of those are what the Artifice normally publishes. Secondly, the premise is a little faulty, as "straight news" has rarely, if ever, been successful. Famous news personalities are just that: personalities. Walter Cronkite didn't just read the teleprompter, he made families trust him. Chris Evans isn't popular because of what he writes, but how he writes it. As such, I must unfortunately disagree with this topic. – Christopher Vance 5 years ago
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  • I think well written articles don't always need fluff. Part of an article being well written is that it should be able to present facts and allow you to come to your own conclusion. Adding a voice, generally adds a bias or personal view. I think both types of writing have their own purpose and place. – Tatijana 5 years ago
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  • Great topic, I might think about picking it up. I think, while it is necessary to hold on to the roots provided by print journalism, to give this a proactive or timeless element, one should also try to see how print and online journalism can combine to tell stories better. While it is important to historicise the issue, the real problem is that news is told in such a bland way that people begin to experience what is known as "compassion fatigue", where they are shown things which need action in repetitive narratives to the point where they can not be bothered to care anymore. Therefore, whoever wants to take this on, I would recommend not spending too long labouring the point that print journalism needs saving, but rather that journalism overall needs a paradigmatic shift to keep enough people interesting in inciting social change. – Matthew Sims 5 years ago
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4

Blogging and Journalism

Blogging has become a large part of Journalism, both for professionals and amateurs. What are the positives and negatives of this?

  • One negative is certainly that the "anyone can do it" mentality over-saturates the market. It can be difficult for people to sift through the slush to find actual valuable information, not just random spurts of someone who can fake experience and their intelligence on the subject. – Christina Legler 5 years ago
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  • While one positive is that blogging can give a voice to the people who may feel they are not given a chance to be heard. They can share their opinion on popular topics, participate in open discussions, and give new viewpoints to different stories. – Megan Finsel 5 years ago
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  • Interesting, it would also be worth commenting on how this affects the more 'traditional' film critics, such as those established with print newspapers versus online critics, especially when it comes to making a living. – IsabelleMilton 5 years ago
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  • While I think this is a good jumping off point, I think it presumes too much, e.g. that blogging is simply being accepted by everyone. I think this topic could includes points about what needs to change to further normalise bloggers, such as a way to find an appropriate convergence point for amateurs and professionals. Also, indication towards a paradigmatic shift about what journalism will be into the future. – Matthew Sims 5 years ago
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