Megan F.

Megan F.

Contributing writer for The Artifice.

Junior Contributor III

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Latest Articles

Latest Topics

5

Writing through History; how Writing has Impacted America

Through the centuries, writing has been a powerful form of communication. Whether be it a political pamphlet, a provocative essay, or a news article, writing was an important way to translate individuals’ ideas and viewpoints. Analyze how writing has helped to empower and shape American history. Compare and contrast historical speeches and/or important, influential writers, authors, or essayists. Simply put, writing helped shape our country.

  • Love this topic, it would really be interesting to maybe also cover the change as to who people see as influential. Nowadays, many people look towards comedians and TV/Film writers as influential towards politics instead of journalists and politicians. – Austin Bender 2 years ago
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  • I think there are plenty of great examples to delve into where the written word ventures into sociopolitical territory. – MichelleAjodah 2 years ago
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  • Would it be better to focus on a specific part of American history i.e. American culture in evaluating this topic? – Ryan Errington 1 year ago
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  • I think this is an excellent topic and I do agree that whomever decides to take this one should concentrate on a particular period in time. While reading this topic suggestion, I immediately thought of the civil rights movement due to the amount of varying literature that was disseminated at the time. Some was bitter, and visceral, while other writings were beautiful and unifying. This is a very important topic...nice contribution, and one that I do hope to see as an article! – danielle577 1 year ago
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  • You might want to be careful with your title. America is actually misused by many Americans; it refers to the entirety of North and South America. You may want to alter your title to "How Writing has Impacted the United States" or something of the sort. I know it wouldn't bother Americans, but it might bother readers from elsewhere in the Americas. – Laura Jones 1 year ago
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Prosody; the Real Struggle for Poets

Prosody has become almost a dying art in poetry, both on and off the age. With a rise in spoken-word, modern writing styles has kind of thrown the traditional rule-book out the window. But is proper meter and rhyme scheme a thing of Shakespearean past? Perhaps, by reviving the techniques behind the art form, we can reach a new level of creativity when it comes to poetry.

  • Also, the writer could definitely look into education courses, workshops, etc. to see how they teach the rules before the artist breaks them. – Jaye Freeland 2 years ago
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  • Recently I have started writing poetry as part of my doctorate of Education program where I am using poetic inquiry in an Autoetnograhical Arts Based Research framework. I am finding that, for the most part, the poems have a mind of their own...and while some are free form others take on rhythm and rhyme...with the result that the poem will generally seek unexpected paths... – bdecker 2 years ago
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Kindle vs Print; Spanning the Digital Divide

How has the rising popularity in Kindle and ebooks hindered the print medium? Will physical hardcover and paperback books someday go into extinction? While Kindles appeal to the younger, hipper audience, paperbacks still seem to retain a sort of traditional class. Why? Even though they both have their arguable pros and cons, what will become of printed works in the near and long-term future?

  • The funny thing is, the content of this article would likely have been different less than a year ago. Kindle sales seemed to skyrocket for a while, but as I understand it, paperbacks are now on the rise again. From my own standpoint, I do better electronically so I wonder if the target age group has an effect on that. – mattdoylemedia 2 years ago
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  • This is such an interesting topic as it becomes increasingly relevant. A lot of people these days have e-readers and a lot of the time ebooks are cheaper. But there is diffidently a core community that love their books more than ebooks. I personally use both. – Hpfan28 2 years ago
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  • On the other end, the sudden rise in the e-reader brought attention to reading in general, so in a sense it helped the book world as a whole, including paperbacks. – LaRose 2 years ago
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  • I personally prefer printed books over an electronic source, but that's just me. My mom used to work for a book manufacturing company and she would often talk about how their business took a hit after the release of Kindles and Nooks. I have a Nook myself, but never use it. I feel like the people younger than me, who grew up with a lot of technology at their finger tips, enjoy eBooks more just because they are used to things like that. – diehlsam 2 years ago
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Keeping Banned Books on our Reading Lists

The words ‘banned book’ can tend to drive people away from good content. But there are many reasons why everyone should consider reading at least one book that has been challenged or banned. This article would explore the benefits of reading such books. What kinds of lessons do works such as "The Lorax" or "Go Ask Alice" have to teach us? Has some of the books on this list been falsely accused (for example the Oxford Dictionary)? In short, banned books still have a lot to offer us, and are vastly under-appreciated.

  • I feel that this can be very broad a topic without specifying location. Do you mean on reading lists in America? Or in Europe? Or Germany? Culture relevancy is a major reason why books are banned, and gaining an understanding of why books are banned in specific locations can help the author reach a more poignant conclusion. – Jemarc Axinto 2 years ago
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  • Agree with the above. Also, I think it's obvious that controversial literature still has 'a lot to offer us' - the discussion could perhaps to be orientated on how their banning has added to their value to make a more audacious link. – JekoJeko 2 years ago
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  • I agree with Jemarc that with such a broad topic it needs to be narrowed down some more or even give more details on multiple points to give a general feel of the article. – Kevin Mohammed 2 years ago
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  • I don't think this topic can been justice without squeezing the concept of freedom from it. Whether books are banned or not is a question of whether a society (or nation) operates under a framework of freedom which allows certain types of books to be labeled as banned. For instance, I would venture a guess that when most Americans think of banned books they associate imagery of the Nazis burning books or of communist nations destroying books deemed dissident (in which case the author too is hunted down and silenced.) However, there have been plenty of banned books in America too. Bukowski and Vonnegut for example, in the realm of fiction. And Howard Zinn in the realm of academic non-fiction. I think this topic could lead to an interesting and important conversation about how much banned books can tell us about the level of freedom which a society operates under. – mcutler1 2 years ago
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  • Definitely a great topic. I would suggest researching Banned Book Week and see if the BannedBooksWeek website has any resources that would be of service to you. There were some notes on your topic being a little too general. Maybe, if you'd like, you could narrow your banned book search by grade level (i.e. Elementary, Middle Grade, High School) or, you can break it down by canon or contemporary. Or both! – Jaye Freeland 2 years ago
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  • Amen! Actually, banning a book makes a lot of people more eager to read and explore it. – Stephanie M. 10 months ago
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Latest Comments

Megan F.

Thank you so much for putting this into words! I work in a library, and we’re putting together a display with the theme of ‘the sublime’ in literature. This article has helped us better determine what exactly we need for the display, and how to define ‘the sublime’ in general. So I just wanted to say a quick thank you, and to note this was very well-written and thought through!

The Sublime's Effects in Gothic Fiction
Megan F.

This is such an interesting article! Your analysis of what differentiates art work from a piece of art is quite intriguing. As both an artist and an author, I believe that art is subjective and that it all depends on the personal experiences of the audience, whatever the medium. Take for example spoken-word poetry. Two different people can listen to the same poem performed by the poet and have two completely different experiences. It all depends on context. It can also be speculated that the “sublime” is rooted in human emotions. The experience of the artwork can evoke strong memories, which trigger stronger emotions, which in turn connect the audience to the artwork and (ultimately) the artist. This is why art is such a good way to convey messages to the public. But I also think it is the subjective nature associated with art that makes the whole art experience itself worthwhile. Overall, very thought provoking and thoroughly enjoyable!

That's Just, Like, Your Opinion, Man: An Argument that Art is Objective
Megan F.

How interesting! This is a very intellectual article with some really deep and thought-provoking theories. Poe is one of my favorite authors and poets; I’ll have to go and read this story now with new insight.

The Melancholy of Two Ushers: Into the Mind of Poe
Megan F.

This is such a compelling and interesting article. All of your points are very thought provoking, and it was such a joy to read! It makes sense that the choices authors force – or don’t force – their characters to make that reveal the characters’ personalities, and ultimately their flaws. It’s a very useful tool for authors to use. So for Peter to not make a definitive choice only shows the flaw in his personality. He is a child, and children can be very indecisive at times. They can be stubborn and determined, too, which Peter demonstrates by not wanting to grow up. At least that is what I’ve gathered. Anyways, thank you for writing such a beautiful piece!

The Problem of Peter Pan: Should Choices Hurt?
Megan F.

This is an amazing and well written article! You discuss some really great points about the films and their underlying themes. I’m not a huge fan of war genre movies, but your article made me reconsider them in a different light. Very enjoyable; nice work!

The 10 Greatest War Films of All Time (So Far)
Megan F.

This is such a wonderful, well-written article! I thoroughly enjoyed how you correlated the sublime to women’s rights, and your references to Female Gothic. All your points are every deep; it really made me reconsider Gothic lit in a new light. Your thoughts concerning Jane Eyre and Frankenstein were also intriguing, I’m going to have to read the books with new insight now. Again, wonderful work!

The Sublime's Effects in Gothic Fiction
Megan F.

How intriguing! I love Fantasy, and as an author myself I am often drawn to the genre most in my own writing. It seems to be difficult for the genre to break away from the typical high fantasy and epic quests, but it is definitely developing into something much more than magic and fairies. I enjoyed how you related Postmodernism to Fantasy; it’s very well-planned and thoughtful. This was a very enjoyable article!

Fantasize the Fantasy Tomorrow
Megan F.

It was very intriguing to read about this topic seen through lens of a video game. One could also say that the text adventure falls into the subcategory of Interactive Fiction. As a writer, I find that the text adventure broadens the horizon for more exploration in a story (on the part of both the reader and the author). Overall, very interesting article. Nicely done!

The Text Adventure: Relic of Gaming History, or Timeless Medium?